Press Release: October Public Programs

The City University of New York Graduate Center announces the following public programs to be held during the month of October at the Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue at 34th Street. For further information about the Graduate Center and its public programs, visit www.gc.cuny.edu.

Tuesday, September 21–Saturday, January 8:

Deep Impressions: Willie Cole Works on Paper
(art exhibition) James Gallery, Tuesdays & Wednesdays, 12–8 PM; Thursdays–Saturdays, 12–6 PM; opening reception on Tuesday, October 12, 5:30–7 PM

New Jersey artist Willie Cole is best known for sculptures that use American consumer and industrial detritus. Deep Impressions provides an intimate look at Cole's art through his works on paper and highlights his recent return to figurative, more overtly autobiographic subject matter. Presented by the James Gallery; free, for information call 212-817-7392.

Wednesday, September 29–Friday, October 1:

PRELUDE 10

(theatre festival) 3:00–10:00 PM, Martin E. Segal Theatre; for complete schedule visit http://preludenyc.org

The Segal Center's annual PRELUDE festival celebrates artists at the forefront of contemporary NYC theatre and performance. PRELUDE 10: "Techniques for Live Stimulation: Communication, Provocation, Simulation" asks: Why Does Live Matter? Presented by the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center; free, for information call 212-817-1860.

Friday, October 1:

For Beauty Is a Series of Hypotheses?
(discussion) 4:00 PM, Skylight Room (9100)

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick is best known as the author of a series of quickly paradigmatic texts on queer and affect theory, including Between Men: English Literature and Male Homosocial Desire, Epistemology of the Closet, Tendencies, and Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity. Much less appreciated is the fact that Sedgwick was also a devoted and passionate fiber artist, whose works were shown in exhibitions including Floating Columns/In the Bardo, Bodhisattva Fractal World and Works in Fiber, Paper and Proust. Join Jason Edwards (reader in art history at the University of York and author of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick)as he examines a broad range of Sedgwick's art works, contextualizing them closely in relation to her better-known literary, theoretical, and other works on paper. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Monday, October 4:

Emotional Politics
(discussion) 6:00 PM, Martin E. Segal Theatre

Why have emotions and personal feelings become so prominent in the public sphere? How do ideologies take hold of our psyches? Join noted political scientist Ted Brader and psychologist David Pizarro as they discuss the role of emotions in politics, from opinion polls to elections. Ted Brader is an associate professor of political science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and author of Campaigning for Hearts and Minds: How Emotional Appeals in Political Ads Work, and David Pizarro is an assistant professor of psychology at Cornell University, whose recent article, "Conservatives are more easily disgusted than liberals," appeared in the journal Cognition and Emotion. Moderated by Peter Liberman, resident Mellon fellow at the Center for Humanities and professor of political science at Queens College and the Graduate Center. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Tuesday, October 5:

Staging Elizabeth Bishop’s Letters
(discussion) 6:30 PM, Martin E. Segal Theatre

In anticipation of the centenary celebrations of Bishop's birth in 1911, and in connection with the upcoming publication of Elizabeth Bishop and The New Yorker: The Complete Correspondence (forthcoming in 2011 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux), editor and poet Joelle Biele and guest performers will present a staged theatrical performance of Bishop's letters as a work-in-progress. In this workshop, audience members will be invited to comment on the translation of the epistolary to the performed, letter writing as performance, and the relationships between writers, editors, and their audience. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Wednesday, October 6:

Powers of Ten
(discussion) 7:00 PM, Elebash Recital Hall

Celebrate 10/10/10 (a few days early). We will observe the date with a tribute to the classic short film Powers of Ten, by designers Charles and Ray Eames, which is a journey of scale, from the infinitesimal to the cosmic. One of the most widely seen short films of all time -- at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum for decades and still widely used in schools around the world -- Powers of Ten has influenced pop culture from The Simpsons to the rock band Coldplay, from Hummer commercials to the movie Men in Black. Discussion with Beatriz Colomina, D. Graham Burnett, and Eames Demetrios. Presented by Science & the Arts; free, for information call 212-817-7522.

Thursday, October 7:

Music in Midtown: Chamber Music on Fifth II
(concert) 1:00 PM, Elebash Recital Hall

Music in Midtown's second concert of the fall showcases chamber music performed by students enrolled in the DMA music performance program. The October 7 program will feature various groups playing works by Ned Rorem, Shirish Korde, Toru Takemitsu, Sergei Rachmaninoff, and Marie Incontrera. Performers include Chih-tung Cheng, piano; Emily Eagen, soprano; Monica Harte, soprano; Barrett Hipes, percussion; Mary Hubbell, soprano; Alice Jones, flute; Kuan Cheng Lu, violin; and Oliver Markson, piano. Tickets, which cost $8 ($6 members), may be purchased at www.gc.cuny.edu/events or by calling 212-868-4444. To join the Graduate Center's Membership Program and receive an instant 25% discount code visit the Graduate Center Membership page.

Tuesday, October 12:

Serbian Playwright Biljana Srbljanovic's Locusts
(reading & discussion) 6:30 PM, Martin E. Segal Theatre

A reading of Locusts, a dark farce about petty, vicious and unremarkable people by one of the Balkans' strongest contemporary intellectual and artistic voices. Presented in collaboration with the Romanian Cultural Institute. Presented by the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center; free, for information call 212-817-1860.

Wednesday, October 13:

Old Nueva York (1613-1945) and New Nueva York (1945-2010): Acorn and Tree?
(discussion) 6:30 PM, Elebash Recital Hall

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Mike Wallace (John Jay College & the Graduate Center) will give a brief illustrated overview of the exhibition Nueva York (1613-1945), currently at El Museo del Barrio. Co-sponsored with the New-York Historical Society, it looks at the relationship between New York City and the Spanish-speaking world over more than three centuries. Wallace will be followed by a conversation -- moderated by Maria Hinojosa (PBS) -- on the relationship between the pre-1945 and post-1945 periods. Panelists include Juan Gonzale (New York Daily News), Lisandro Pérez (John Jay College), Virginia Sánchez-Korrol (Brooklyn College), Robert Smith (Baruch College), and Silvio Torres-Salliant (Syracuse University). Tickets, which cost $8 ($6 members), may be purchased at www.gc.cuny.edu/events or by calling 212-868-4444. To join the Graduate Center's Membership Program and receive an instant 25% discount code visit the Graduate Center Membership page.

Friday, October 15:

Diane di Prima: An Evening of Reading & Conversation
(discussion) 6:00 PM, Martin E. Segal Theatre

Join the iconic poet and activist Diane di Prima for a rare New York City appearance. Graduate Center Professor Ammiel Alcalay will engage her in a conversation about her work and life after her reading. Over the span of her remarkable career, di Prima has published 43 books of poetry and prose and, as per Allen Ginsberg, "broke barriers of race-class identity and delivered a major body of verse brilliant in its particularity." She is presently the Poet Laureate of San Francisco. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Monday, October 18:

Jazz Legacies: A Conversation with Ron Carter
(discussion) 7:00 PM, Elebash Recital Hall

In the Jazz Legacies series, the Graduate Center's Gary Giddins, acclaimed critic and author, speaks with jazz legends about their life and work. This year's series begins with a conversation featuring bassist and cellist Ron Carter. Carter's appearances on over 2,500 albums make him one of the most-recorded bassists in jazz history. Carter is also an acclaimed cellist and has recorded numerous times on that instrument. Tickets, which cost $12 ($8 members), may be purchased at www.gc.cuny.edu/events or by calling 212-868-4444. To join the Graduate Center's Membership Program and receive an instant 25% discount code visit the Graduate Center Membership page.

Wednesday, October 20:

Creation
(film screening & discussion) 7:00 PM, Elebash Recital Hall

A screening of Creation, a film about Charles Darwin, preceded by a discussion with scientists, the filmmaker, and biographer Randal Keynes, Darwin's great great grandson. Shown in collaboration with the Imagine Science Film Festival. The screening will be preceded by a discussion with Randal Keynes and the eminent biologists Sean B Carroll and Cliff Tabin, moderated by science writer Carl Zimmer. Expected appearance by film director Jon Amiel. Presented by Science & the Arts; free, for information call 212-817-7522.

Tendencies: Poetics and Practice
(discussion) 7:00 PM, Skylight Room (9100)

This series of talks by and about major contemporary poets, curated by Tim Peterson (Trace) and titled in honor of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, explores the relationship between queer theory, poetic manifesto, poetic practice, and pedagogy. Visit http://tendenciespoetics.com for commentary and sample recordings from past events, as well as news about upcoming events. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Thursday, October 21:

The Third Annual U.S. Intellectual History Conference
also on Friday, October 22

This two-day conference returns to the Graduate Center, bringing together internationally recognized scholars to reflect upon the theme "Intellectuals and Their Publics." Thursday's program is highlighted by an evening plenary session, "Renewing Black Intellectual History," featuring Adolph Reed, Jr., Kenneth Warren, Dean Robinson, and Touré Reed. The Friday evening plenary "Intellectual History for What?" features Casey Nelson Blake, George Cotkin, Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, Rochelle Gurstein, David Steigerwald, and Wilfred McClay. James Kloppenberg will be giving the keynote address on Friday afternoon, based on his forthcoming book, Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition. For a full schedule, venues and registration information, visit the U.S. Intellectual History Blog: http://us-intellectual-history.blogspot.com/2010/07/third-annual-us-intellectual-history.html
Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Music in Midtown: Dorian Wind Quintet
(concert) 1:00 PM, Elebash Recital Hall

The Dorian Wind Quintet is recognized worldwide by professional musicians and audiences for its uniquely polished and passionate performances. Since its formation at Tanglewood in 1961, the quintet has performed repertoire ranging from the Baroque to Pulitzer Prize-winning commissions in the world's most renowned concert halls. The Dorian made history as the first wind quintet to appear at Carnegie Hall (1981). The program will include transcriptions of selected works of J. S. Bach, arranged for woodwind quintet by Mordechai Rechtman (b. 1926), and the Anniversary Variations on a theme of Antonín Reicha. The members of Dorian are Gretchen Pusch, flute; Gerard Reuter, oboe; Jerry Kirkbride, clarinet; John Hunt, bassoon; and Karl Kramer-Johansen, horn. Tickets, which cost $8 ($6 members), may be purchased at www.gc.cuny.edu/events or by calling 212-868-4444. To join the Graduate Center's Membership Program and receive an instant 25% discount code visit the Graduate Center Membership page.

Friday, October 22:

Poets for Living Waters
(reading & discussion) 6:00 PM, Skylight Room (9100)

Join poets Nicole Cooley and Tonya Foster, poets and editors of the Poets for Living Waters initiative, Amy King and Heidi Lynn Staples, and guest readers for an evening of poetry and eco-poetics in the wake of large-scale catastrophes in the Gulf and the surrounding regions. The online poetry forum and activist group Poets for Living Waters features daily poetic responses to the recent oil spill; for more information, visit http://poetsgulfcoast.wordpress.com/. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Monday, October 25:

Condition: Critical / David Cote (Theatre Critic, Time Out New York)
(discussion) 6:30 PM, Martin E. Segal Theatre

A panel of noted critics assesses the impact on theatre criticism of blogs, Twitter and shrinking media budgets. Can online platforms lead to a resurgence of this once-honored vocation, or do they signal its death knell? Presented by the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center; free, for information call 212-817-1860.

Tuesday, October 26:

Dangerous Game: New Yorkers at Play
(discussion) 6:30 PM, Elebash Recital Hall

New York offers innumerable opportunities for looking at our neighbors, our city and ourselves -- and for being looked at in return. The spaces where New Yorkers spend their leisure time have been particularly fertile, revealing how people of varying backgrounds came together to dance, to drink, or to see a film, and attracting the attention of reformers and the police in the process. Join historian Jennifer Fronc (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) with David Freeland and James Sanders for a panel examining the history of leisure in Manhattan -- both legal and extra-legal. Book signing to follow. Tickets, which cost $8 ($6 members), may be purchased at www.gc.cuny.edu/events or by calling 212-868-4444. To join the Graduate Center's Membership Program and receive an instant 25% discount code visit the Graduate Center Membership page.

Translating Job and Ecclesiastes
(discussion) 6:30 PM, Skylight Room (9100)

Join eminent scholar and translator Robert Alter as he discusses the special challenges of conveying biblical poetry and prose in English and reads from his new work, an ambitious and impressive new translation, with commentary, of the Wisdom Books, including Job, the work of "the greatest biblical poet," the Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes. Robert Alter is professor of Hebrew and comparative literature at UC Berkeley and has published many acclaimed works on the Bible, literary modernism, and contemporary Hebrew literature, including several previous translations from the Hebrew Bible. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Thursday, October 28:

Concerts & Conversations:
New York: The 75th Anniversary of Porgy and Bess
(performance & discussion) 7:00 PM, Elebash Recital Hall

A Celebration of the 75th Anniversary of the opera Porgy and Bess by George Gershwin. Highlights of the opera will be performed by stars of some of the world's premiere opera companies, interspersed with narration of the story, by actor Avery Brooks. Featuring Terry Cook, bass baritone; Indira Mahajan, soprano; Lawrence Craig, and others. Conceived by Gershwin as an "American folk opera,” Porgy and Bess premiered in New York in the fall of 1935 and featured a cast of classically trained African-American singers -- a daring and visionary artistic choice at the time. Incorporating a wealth of blues and jazz idioms into the classical art form of opera, Gershwin considered it his finest work. Tickets, which cost $24 ($18 members), may be purchased at www.gc.cuny.edu/events or by calling 212-868-4444. To join the Graduate Center's Membership Program and receive an instant 25% discount code visit the Graduate Center Membership page.

2010 New York Sanjo Festival and Symposium:
9:00 AM–9:00 PM, Elebash Recital Hall; also on Friday, October 29

Sanjo’s origin is in the music of the Korean indigenous shaman culture that is filled with Korean spirit and sentiment. Koreans strongly identify with this music which grew to be the greatest instrumental genre of the 19th century. This genre adopted elements and stylistic features from the court and folk music traditions, and has come to reflect a "pan-musical" style that is quintessentially Korean. As solo instrumental music, Sanjo offers many opportunities for dazzling virtuosic display in the course of its multi-movement form. The soloist interacts with rhythmic accompaniment given by the janggo, the traditional hourglass-shaped, double-headed drum. At the 2010 Festival and Symposium, Sanjo shares the international stage with the American jazz/blues tradition and modal systems such as Indian raga and Turkish maqam. A wide range of lectures by scholars of the music will also be given. Sanjo Master Performances will feature Master Baek In- Young (gayageum), Master Weon Jang-Hyeon (daegeum & geomungo), Master Kim Yeong-Gil (ajaeng), Master Hong Ok- Mi (haegeum) and Master Kim Gyu-Heyong (janggo). Presented by the Ph.D.-D.M.A. Program in Music; free, for information call 949-295-2383.

Friday, October 29:

The Making of The Big Bang Theory
(discussion) 7:00 PM, Proshansky Auditorium

How does the CBS television situation-comedy The Big Bang Theory keep its science references accurate? David Saltzberg (UCLA, Department of Physics), the series consultant, will explain the science behind the hit comedy. Saltzberg checks scripts and meets with the producers, writers, actors, set decorators, prop masters, and costume designers to help ensure scientific accuracy. He also writes the blog "The Big Blog Theory" that explains the science behind each episode at http://thebigblogtheory.wordpress.com. Free, but seating is limited and reservations are required. Reservations can be made at www.gc.cuny.edu/events. For further information, call 212-817-8215.

Submitted on: OCT 1, 2010

Category: Center for the Humanities, Events, Press Room