Narrative in Practice: Opacity, Dissonance, Encounter Underground, Erasure

MAR 16, 2017 | 10:00 AM

Details

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:

9205

WHEN:

March 16, 2017: 10:00 AM

CONTACT INFO:

ADMISSION:

Free

SPONSOR:

IRADAC

Description

Narrative in Practice: Opacity, Dissonance, Encounter Underground, Erasure

The “narrative turn” in the social sciences, as manifested through the renewed emphasis on human agency, the centrality of language to the negotiation of meaning and the construction of identity in everyday life, has marked a resurgence of interest in narrative as a social act, on storytelling as a social process, and life histories as social objects for investigation. This symposium considers narrative in practice, emphasizing the range of challenges scholars encounter when engaging in storytelling, particularly given our desire to “speak back” and counter hegemonic historical narratives that violently flatten the identities, experiences, and radical possibilities of those we engage in our scholarly and political work. What political work do narratives perform, and to what end? Although narratives can be a site of resistance that can lead to the authoring and promoting of new and potentially transformative stories (local stories, in particular), we must also consider their stubborn ability to feed and maintain power structures. Why do some narratives achieve widespread appeal? This symposium will engage a variety of research and theoretical orientations across the humanities and social sciences threading the notion of narratives into practice to themes of dissonance, encounter, opacity, underground, and erasure.

10:00–10:05am    Welcome By Martin Ruck, Ph.D., Acting Director of IRADAC

10:10–10:15am    Introduction By Ruth Gilmore, PH.D., Director of CPCP

10:15–11:00am    Erika Denisse Grajeda, PH.D.
Silence, Narrativity, and ‘The Right to Opacity: The paradoxes and transformative possibilities of storytelling in contemporary domestic worker organizing in the U.S.

11:05–11:15am    COFFEE  BREAK

11:20–12:05pm     MAMYRAH DOUGÉ-PROSPER, PH.D.
Solidary Economies in Rural Haiti: Praxes of anti-colonial feminist nationalism

12:10–1:10pm    LUNCH  BREAK

1:15–2:00pm    Nessete Falu, PH.D.
Ethical Encounters: The disjunctures of narrativizing masculinities, race, and “best place” in Brazilian gynecology

2:05–2:15pm    COFFEE  BREAK

2:20–3:05pm    Sónia Vaz Borges PH.D.
Silences in African History: The underground education structures

3:10–3:20pm    COFFEE  BREAK

3:25–4:10pm    Evelyne Laurent-Perrault, PH.D.
Black Women Litigants: Unveiling narratives of erasure and dispossession in Spanish America, 1770-1800

4:15–4:20pm    Conclusion By Herman Bennett, PH.D., Department Of History and IRADAC

4:30–7:00pm    Open Forum & refreshments,   Anthropology   Lounge

ERIKA DENISSE GRAJEDA, PH.D.
Marilyn J. Gittell Post-Doctoral Fellow, Cuny Graduate Center
Silence, Narrativity, and ‘The Right to Opacity’: the paradoxes
and transformative possibilities of storytelling in contemporary domestic worker organizing in the U.S.

MAMYRAH DOUGÉ-PROSPER, PH.D.
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Cuny Graduate Center, IRADAC
Solidarity Economies in Rural Haiti: Praxes of anti-colonial feminist nationalism

NESSETTE FALU, PH.D.
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Cuny Graduate Center, IRADAC
Ethical Encounters: The disjunctures of narrativizing masculinities, race, and “best place” in Brazilian gynecology

SÓNIA VAZ BORGES, PH.D.
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Cuny Graduate Center, The Center For Place, Culture, And Politics
Silences in African History: The underground education structures

EVELYNE LAURENT-PERRAULT, PH.D.
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Cuny Graduate Center, IRADAC
Black Women Litigants: Unveiling narratives of erasure and dis- possession in Spanish America, 1770-1800