ARC Seminar: Brian Nolan: Inequality and Prosperity

OCT 05, 2017 | 4:30 PM TO 6:30 PM

Details

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:

5318

WHEN:

October 05, 2017: 4:30 PM-6:30 PM

CONTACT INFO:

ADMISSION:

Free

SPONSOR:

Advanced Research Collaborative (ARC)

Description

ARC Seminar: Brian Nolan: Inequality and Prosperity

Inequality is centre-stage in political debate both globally and in individual countries, being blamed for everything from Brexit and the rise of populism to stagnating wages and growth. This talk, based on the findings of a three-year research programme at the Institute for New Economic Thinking, University of Oxford, will seek to tease out why this is so and identify central unanswered questions about the drivers of inequality and what policy responses to it should be.

Brian Nolan is Director of the Employment, Equity and Growth Programme at the Institute for New Economic Thinking, Oxford Martin School, Professor of Social Policy at the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and Senior Research Fellow at Nuffield College Oxford. His main areas of research are income inequality, poverty, and the economics of social policy. He has led and participated in a wide range of comparative studies on poverty, income inequality, social policies, tax and transfer policies, the labour market, the minimum wage, and health inequalities and healthcare. His publications include The Handbook of Economic Inequality (2008) co-edited with W. Salverda and T. Smeeding, Poverty and Deprivation in Europe (2011) co-authored with C. T. Whelan, The Great Recession and the Distribution of Household Income (2013), co-edited with S. Jenkins, A. Brandolini and J. Micklewright, two co-edited volumes with W. Salverda et al., Changing Inequalities in Rich Countries: Analytical and Comparative Perspectives and Changing Inequalities and Societal Impacts in Rich Countries: Thirty Countries’ Experiences (2014), and Children of Austerity: The Impact of the Great Recession on Child Poverty in Rich Countries, co-edited with B. Cantillon, Y. Czhzen, and S. Handa, all from Oxford University Press.