The Corpus of New York City English Outreach Project

OCT 12, 2017 | 4:30 PM TO 6:30 PM

Details

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:

5318

WHEN:

October 12, 2017: 4:30 PM-6:30 PM

CONTACT INFO:

ADMISSION:

Free

SPONSOR:

Advanced Research Collaborative (ARC)

Description

ARC Seminar: Cecelia Cutler: The Corpus of NYC English Outreach Project: Dialect and Multilingualism Awareness in our Schools and Communities

Interest in language variation, including in "Englishes", has led to the building of several large speech corpora on both sides of the Atlantic (Philadelphia, Toronto, London, Amsterdam, Oslo, Stockholm, and Berlin). The current project draws on the results of an ongoing large-scale NSF project to develop a Corpus of New York City English (CoNYCE) with the goal of developing a one million+ word, audio-aligned, parsed corpus of New York City English (Tortora, Cutler, Haddican, Newman, Santorini). Inspired by the work of Cameron et. al., (1993), Purnell, et. al. (2013), Wolfram & Reaser (2008), and Hudley & Mallinson (2013), this presentation outlines a model for disseminating the findings generated by the CoNYCE team to create a series of outreach projects aimed at the general public as well as school teachers and students. The thrust of these various outreach projects is centered on enhancing dialect awareness, appreciation for the multilingual origins of NYCE, and understandings of the ways in which multilingualism and immigration are continuing to shape local patterns of language use. This talk will give an overview of the progress of the outreach efforts as well as reflections about interactions with teachers, school children, and members of the public.

Cecelia Cutler works on language and identity, particularly among young people in the U.S. who affiliate with hip-hop culture. Some of her current work explores multilingualism and alignment in computer mediated communication among Mexican-American youth and language attitudes towards Scottish English on YouTube. She is also working on a three-year collaborative NSF-funded project on variation and change in New York City English with Christina Tortora, Michael Newman, and Bill Haddican.