Dagmar Herzog
Position: Distinguished Professor
Program: History
Campus Affiliation: Graduate Center
Phone: (212) 817-8468
Degrees/Diplomas: Ph.D. Brown University
Research Interests: Modern European; History of Sexuality; History of Religion
Dagmar Herzog, appointed to the Graduate Center in August 2005, conducts transnational and comparative research on how religion and secularization have affected social and political developments in modern Europe. An expert on the histories of Nazism and the Holocaust and their aftermath, she gives particular attention in her research to methodological innovations in critical source analysis and in gender and sexuality studies.
 
Herzog is the author of Sexuality in Europe: A Twentieth-Century History (2011); Sex in Crisis: The New Sexual Revolution and the Future of American Politics (2008); Sex after Fascism: Memory and Morality in Twentieth-Century Germany (2005), which has been translated into German and Japanese; and Intimacy and Exclusion: Religious Politics in Pre-Revolutionary Baden (1996). She has edited six anthologies, including After the History of Sexuality: German Genealogies With and Beyond Foucault (2012), with Helmut Puff and Scott Spector; Brutality and Desire: War and Sexuality in Europe’s Twentieth Century (2009); and Lessons and Legacies VII: The Holocaust in International Perspective (2007).
 
Herzog was awarded a 2012 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship for a trans-Atlantic research project on the European and American histories of psychoanalysis, trauma, and desire. She has also received fellowships from the Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Historical Studies at Princeton University, the Ford Foundation, the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Social Science Research Council, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. She is active in the work of the Holocaust Educational Foundation and serves as a member of the Board of Editors for the American Historical Review.