Elizabeth Macaulay-Lewis
Position: Visiting Assistant Professor Liberal Studies MA and Deputy Executive Officer
Campus Affiliation: Graduate Center
Degrees/Diplomas: D.Phil., Oxford University
Research Interests: Archaeology; Architectural History; Classical material culture; Roman material culture; Islamic art, architecture and material culture; Reception studies.

New MALS Track: The Archaeology of the Classical, Late Antique, and Islamic Worlds

Courses Taught in MALS: Narrative of New York: Ancient Forms in New Worlds (Spring 2012)

Great Digs: Important sites of the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic Worlds (Fall 2012) From Alexander to Muhammad: Introduction to the Cultures of the Ancient Mediterranean (Spring 2013)

Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies: Becoming Lewis Mumford: Studying, Analyzing and Writing About the Architecture of New York City (Spring 2013)

Publications:
Monograph
Bayt Farhi and the forgotten palaces of Damascus: Diversity and domestic architecture in the late Ottoman Empire. (In preparation)

Edited Volumes
Bragg, E., Hau, L.I. and Macaulay-Lewis, E. 2008. Beyond the battlefields: new perspectives on warfare and society in the Graeco-Roman world. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars.

Schroeder, H., Edwards, P., Gardner, P., Jefferson, V. and Macaulay-Lewis, E. 2007. Crossing frontiers: the opportunities and challenges of interdisciplinary approaches to archaeology: proceedings of a conference held at the University of Oxford, 25-26 June 2005. Oxford: Oxford School of Archaeology Monograph Series.

Selected articles and book chapters
Kenawi, M., Macaulay-Lewis, E. and J. McKenzie. 2012. “A Commercial Nursery near Abu Hummus, Egypt, and the Reuse of Amphoras in the Roman Plant Trade” Roman Journal of Archaeology25, 195-225.

Macaulay-Lewis, E. 2011. “The City in Motion,” in Rome, Ostia, Pompeii: Movement and Space, ed. R. Laurence and D. Newsome. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 262-89.

Macaulay-Lewis, E. and K.L. Gleason. 2010. “Introduction,” in The Gardens of the Ancient Mediterranean: Cultural Exchange through Horticultural Design, Technology, and Plants, ed. E. Macaulay-Lewis and K.L. Gleason, 1-8. In Meetings between Cultures in the Ancient Mediterranean. Proceedings of the 17th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Rome 22-26 Sept. 2008. Bollettino di Archeologia on line I 2010, ed. M. Dalla Riva and H. Di Giuseppe.
http://151.12.58.75/archeologia/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=52&Itemid=52

Macaulay-Lewis, E. 2010. “Imported exotica: constructing a model for the study of the ancient plant trade,” in The Gardens of the Ancient Mediterranean: Cultural Exchange through Horticultural Design, Technology, and Plants, ed. E. Macaulay-Lewis and K.L. Gleason, 16-25. In Meetings between Cultures in the Ancient Mediterranean. Proceedings of the 17th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Rome 22-26 Sept. 2008. Bollettino di Archeologia on line I 2010, ed. M. Dalla Riva and H. Di Giuseppe.
http://151.12.58.75/archeologia/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=52&Itemid=52

Macaulay-Lewis, E. 2009. “Political Museums: porticos, gardens and the public display of art in ancient Rome,” in Collecting and dynastic ambition, ed. S. Bracken, A. Galdy, and A. Turpin. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars, 1-22.

Macaulay-Lewis, E. 2008 “The Fruits of Victory: the generals, plants and power in the Roman World” in Beyond the battlefields: new perspectives on warfare and society in the Graeco-Roman world, ed. E. Bragg, L.I. Hau and E. Macaulay-Lewis. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars, 205-25.

About Professor Macaulay-Lewis and Recent Scholarship:

I am interested in the art, archaeology, and architecture of the Classical, Late Antique and Islamic worlds. I have conducted research as a field archaeologist and ceramist in Italy, Jordan, Greece, Syria and Egypt. Currently, I am co-director of the Upper Egypt Mosque Project, which looks at the transformation of religious space in pre- and post-Islamic Egypt. I have just completed a manuscript on house and identity in Ottoman Damascus.

I am also interested in the reception of Classical and Islamic architecture in New York City, as well as the architecture and urban form of New York. Lastly, I am doing more work in the realm of the digital humanities, both in my teaching and research.

To learn more about me, you can visit my website. You can download some of my articles on my profile on academia.edu. To hear what I might be like in class (or on a tour at the MET), listen to my talks on Islamic architecture on Smarthistory.org, a dynamic online art history textbook that is part of the Khan Academy: http://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/mihrab.html

http://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/royal-figures-saljuq-period.html

I am also a member of the governing board of the Archaeological Institute of America, North America’s foremost Archaeological Institution.