Alumni Dissertations and Theses

 
 

Alumni Dissertations and Theses

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  • South Asian American Youth Negotiate Ethnic Identities, Discrimination, and Social Class

    Author:
    Jaicy John
    Year of Dissertation:
    2009
    Program:
    Psychology
    Advisor:
    Colette Daiute
    Abstract:

    This dissertation explored how South Asian American youth from diverse ethnic, religious, and social class backgrounds negotiate identity conflicts. Much of social science research cites the context of privilege assigned by the "model minority" stereotype as the commonly accepted perception of South Asians in the United States. Discrimination associated with the events of 9/11, however, challenge this view in positioning South Asians as racial and religious minorities associated with terrorism and distrust. Furthermore, the contexts of higher education contribute to these clashing contexts by instituting ethnic student organizations that support particular versions of identity practices. These multiple conflicts require South Asian American youth to negotiate or manage their identity practices in specific ways. The aim of this dissertation, thus, was to explore how college-aged South Asian American youth negotiate identity conflicts within these multiple contexts. The key research questions guiding this study were 1) What particular conflicts do South Asian American youth experience in practicing their identities? and 2) How do these youth negotiate these conflicts? 3) How does a practice-based framework extend previous claims of identity as static and unchanging? In order to gather a broader understanding of South Asian American youth identity practices, eighteen 2nd generation South Asian American youth between 18-22 years of age from a public and a private university in New York City engaged in an open-ended semi-structured interview based on constructing "identity maps" and discussing an article documenting the rise of hate crimes after 9/11. Discursive analysis, specifically, positioning techniques were used to analyze how youth constructed their selves and their worlds through talk. Findings from this study demonstrate that South Asian American youth construct identity conflicts and negotiations in contradictory ways. The multiple orientations to "model minority", post 9/11 discrimination, and multiculturalism ideologies suggest that South Asian American identity is not a unitary concept but rather shifts and changes according to immediate and broader social contexts. The research design and the findings from this study contribute to emerging psychological literature that defines identity as a dynamic process rather than a static entity of individuals.

  • Slavery's legacies: An investigation of trauma, attachment, parent-child relations, survival and resistance during African-American enslavement as understood through two female slave narratives

    Author:
    Deshaunta Johnson
    Year of Dissertation:
    2013
    Program:
    Psychology
    Advisor:
    Diana Diamond
    Abstract:

    In this dissertation I put forth that slavery has been under-theorized in psychodynamic literature as a potent cultural and historical traumatogen, the effects of which still reverberate through the process of transgenerational trauma transmission. In making this case, I will critically discuss the narratives of two female slaves; Harriet Jacobs memoir entitled Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), and Annie Burton's Memories of Childhood Slavery Days (1909). These narratives are used to illuminate the nature of trauma, the role of attachment relationships in trauma transmission, and to investigate the conditions of parenting, caregiving, resistance and attachment during slavery. Psychodynamic perspective prove powerful in elucidating inter and intra-racial tensions related to narcissistic rage, trauma, aggression, and forms of resistance to multiple oppressions

  • The Motivation to Defend Shared Beliefs: A Functionalist Account

    Author:
    Adam Johnson
    Year of Dissertation:
    2013
    Program:
    Psychology
    Advisor:
    Curtis Hardin
    Abstract:

    Past research shows that political and ideological disagreements with affiliatively-relevant others tend to be experienced as aversive and potentially damaging to the relationships in which the disagreement arises. While social psychology offers many proximate explanations for this tendency, the more ultimate evolutionary explanations of this automatic, pervasive, and "hot cognition" phenomenon have been under-explored. The current research argues that because high levels of belief consensus within groups increase trust, cooperation, and prosociality among group members, and because these group-level features were adaptively advantageous especially in the context of intergroup competition, then people should be motivated to defend shared beliefs with other ingroup members - and thus find disagreements aversive - when faced with fitness-relevant threats to the group that require high levels of ingroup cohesion. Two experiments tested this prediction by manipulating participants exposure to evolutionarily relevant and non-relevant intergroup threats and then measuring participants' aversion to ideologically-inconsistent beliefs (Exp. 1 & 2), their desire to share beliefs with other ingroup members (Exp. 1), and their attitudes toward ingroup members who challenged shared beliefs (Exp. 2). Results from Experiment 1 showed that in a national intergroup context (American ingroup vs. Chinese outgroup), participants demonstrated greater aversion to ideologically opposing beliefs and greater desire to share beliefs with other ingroup Americans when faced with the evolutionarily-relevant threat of highly-cohesive male outgroup. Results from Experiment 2 showed that in a political intergroup context (Republicans vs. Democrats), somewhat contrary to predictions, participants showed greater aversion to ideologically-inconsistent beliefs and less favorable attitudes toward ingroup members who challenge shared beliefs when primed with highly-creative (vs. high power) male outgroups. Implications for potential ways to reduce political polarization are discussed.

  • SUCCESSFUL AGING: USE OF COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY IN AN ADULT DAY PROGRAM

    Author:
    Wendy Johnson
    Year of Dissertation:
    2014
    Program:
    Psychology
    Advisor:
    Anna Stetsenko
    Abstract:

    This dissertation investigated the relationship between learning digital communication technologies in an intergenerational intervention and successful aging among older adults. The specific goal of this study was to uncover the effects of this intervention on the cultural constructions of aging in an urban Adult Day Program in Trinidad and Tobago. This mixed method study utilized the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS; Sheikh & Yesavage, 1986), a life satisfaction scale, well-being measurements, open-ended survey questionnaires and a focus group session. The results from the quantitative items indicated no significant differences after the intervention; however, the focus group discussion and open-ended surveys provided useful information on the processes involved. This study has implications for the design of similar intergenerational programs throughout Trinidad and Tobago and other Caribbean islands which can promote conditions for successful aging.

  • "That's Not Fair!": Children's Judgments of Moral Behavior and Maternal Fairness in Transgression Encounters

    Author:
    Marla Johnston
    Year of Dissertation:
    2013
    Program:
    Psychology
    Advisor:
    Herbert Saltzstein
    Abstract:

    This study investigated how children evaluate good/bad and how they judge maternal reactions as fair/unfair.  Of particular interest was whether evaluations and judgments during transgression encounters are influenced by the child's age, the domain in which the encounter occurs (Moral, Social-Conventional, Personal or Prudential), variations in story intention/outcome, and the mother's reaction to the transgression. Mothers of twenty-five 3-12 year old children documented multiple real-life discipline encounters they experienced with their child via online questionnaires. Three of each mother's self-reported encounters along with three additional hypothetical stories were coded for domain, written into a storybook format, and read to their child during in-person interviews.  Each child evaluated how good/bad the protagonist of each story was and how fair/unfair the mother in the story was. Results indicate that older and younger children differ in their moral evaluations of encounters in the Moral, Social-Conventional, and Prudential domains. Evaluations of good/bad and fair/unfair vary as a function of age, story intention/outcome, and maternal reaction.

  • The Ecology and Ontogeny of Odor Fear Learning

    Author:
    Patricia Kabitzke
    Year of Dissertation:
    2010
    Program:
    Psychology
    Advisor:
    Christoph Wiedenmayer
    Abstract:

    Predator odors have been found to induce unconditioned fear in adult animals and provide the opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying unlearned and learned fear. The clinical application of this research is to explore the causal relationships between aversive events and psychopathologies such as PTSD. However, trauma often occurs early in life but most current investigations use adult animals in paradigms that employ stimuli with little ecological relevance in limited environmental contexts. Additionally, predator threats change across an animal's lifetime, as do abilities that enable the animal to learn or engage in different defensive behaviors. Thus, the first objective of this study was to determine the combination of factors that successfully induce unlearned fear to predator odor across development. Cat odor effectively induced fear-related behavior across development using the behavioral measure of freezing, especially in infant (PN14) and juvenile (PN26) rats. Once these parameters were understood, they were exploited to develop a learning paradigm to predator odors that could be used in early life. Cat odor produced unlearned, innate fear in infant and juvenile rats, but contextual fear learning occurred only in juveniles. The mechanisms underlying the development of this learning in early life were then explored. It was hypothesized that contextual fear learning is mediated by norepinephrine. Systemic injections of the â-adrenergic antagonist propranolol before exposure to the cat odor reduced the unlearned fear response and memory acquisition whereas injection of propranolol after exposure to cat odor inhibited contextual fear learning in juvenile rats. We suggest that NE mediates the formation of contextual fear memories by activation of the transcription factor CREB in the hippocampus in juveniles but not in infants. Levels of phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) were increased in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus in juvenile, but not infant, rats that had been exposed to cat odor but not in animals exposed to a control odor. Further, propranolol blocked these increases in pCREB. Taken together, these results indicate that, although innate fear occurs within the neonatal period, contextual fear learning is a relatively late-occurring event, is hippocampal dependent, and mediated by norepinephrine.

  • Telework and Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: The Underexplored Roles of Social Identity and Professional Isolation

    Author:
    Lauren Kane
    Year of Dissertation:
    2014
    Program:
    Psychology
    Advisor:
    Kristin Sommer
    Abstract:

    Although telework--a flexible work arrangement in which employees work from a remote location at least some of the time--has been increasing in practice, little research has investigated its implications for employee behaviors and performance. The main focus of this study was to identify the mediating processes that explain the relationship between telework frequency and OCB performance, and to determine whether personality moderates the psychological consequences of teleworking. Survey data were collected from 286 teleworkers and 62 of their coworkers across organizations from a range of industries, jobs, and locations. Coworkers were recruited in order to assess teleworkers' OCBs, but OCBs were also measured via teleworkers' self-reports, as coworker ratings were more difficult to obtain. Two mediational processes were investigated: teleworkers' perceptions of professional isolation, and their identification with their work group and their organization. Individual differences in proactive personality and need to belong were also assessed. Hypotheses positioning professional isolation and identification as partial mediators of the telework-OCB link were not supported. Also contrary to predictions, the personality variables of proactive personality and need to belong did not moderate the relationship between telework and these proposed mediators. However, a serial mediator model provided a better fit to the data. In this revised model, telework frequency was positively related to professional isolation, which was negatively related to both organizational and work group identification, which were subsequently positively related to self-rated OCBs. Telework frequency also bore a direct, positive relationship to identification when controlling for the effects of professional isolation. Lastly, there was a negative direct effect of telework frequency on self-rated OCBs, suggesting that the more frequently individuals teleworked, the fewer OCBs they tended to perform, even after controlling for the mediational roles of professional isolation and social identification. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  • COGNITIVE CONTROL AND CONFLICT PROCESSES IN GERIATRIC DEPRESSION

    Author:
    Theodora Kanellopoulos
    Year of Dissertation:
    2013
    Program:
    Psychology
    Advisor:
    Lisa Ravdin
    Abstract:

    Major depressive disorder is often accompanied by disturbances in aspects of cognitive control that impair goal-directed behavior. In particular, depressed individuals have been found to have deficits in conflict processing, which manifest as inadequate inhibition of maladaptive environmental stimuli and thought patterns. Insufficient cognitive inhibition of irrelevant negative information may contribute to, and perpetuate the depressive syndrome. Prior studies have hypothesized that the neural network that underlies conflict processing consists of the dorsal anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. This network has been shown to be compromised by depression in young adults, as well as by the aging process. However, the temporal properties of conflict processing, within this conflict-control network, have not been fully examined in geriatric depression. In this study, the N2 event-related potential was recorded during a Stroop paradigm administered to 44 depressed and 24 healthy older adults. Depressed subjects exhibited smaller N2 amplitudes to incongruent relative to congruent stimuli. Among healthy non-depressed subjects, there was no difference in N2 amplitudes between conditions. Notably, there were no overall differences in task accuracy or reaction time between the depressed and non-depressed groups. Larger N2 amplitudes were associated with executive dysfunction (i.e., poorer performance on a set-shifting measure) in healthy older adults; however, this relationship was not observed in the depressed group. These results suggest that neural processing abnormalities within the conflict-control network may exist in geriatric depression, above and beyond those attributable to normal age related changes. Furthermore, alternate neural networks may be recruited for successful conflict processing in depressed older adults. Additional characterization of abnormalities within specific conflict processing networks, as well as examination of how these abnormalities relate to the course and treatment of depression can help inform pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions.

  • THE RELATIONSHIP AMONG ATTENTION, DAILY BEHAVIOR AND DISEASE SEVERITY IN PATIENTS WITH ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

    Author:
    Lillian Kaplan
    Year of Dissertation:
    2011
    Program:
    Psychology
    Advisor:
    Nancy Foldi
    Abstract:

    Introduction: Complex instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and basic activities of daily living (BADL) are typically impaired in Alzheimer disease (AD). It is unclear, however, how attention versus global cognitive impairments selectively impact functional decline. We hypothesized that performance on attention tasks would predict functional impairment, and specifically be predictive of IADL. Method: Twenty-seven newly-diagnosed participants with AD were assessed on (1) global cognition: Mattis Dementia Rating Scale-2 (DRS-2); (2) attention: a) RT on simple detection, b) covert orienting, c) speed and errors on executive attention, D-KEFS Trail Making Test (TMT) Condition-4; (3) a) caregiver ratings of IADL/BADL: Modified Lawton-Brody, Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Results: Forty eight percent of the participants had only IADL impairment, while the remaining participants had both IADL and BADL deficits. There were no differences in demographics or cognitive status between those with and without BADL deficits. Hierarchical regression revealed that errors on the TMT Condition- 4 accounted for the majority of IADL variability. After accounting for the TMT Condition-4 errors, the changes in variability of IADL associated with DRS-2 and NPI were minimal. Neither global cognitive scores nor attentional measures predicted BADL performance. Conclusions: IADL impairments are primary deficits at the time of diagnosis of AD, and as hypothesized, a measure of executive attention best predicted the variable daily demands of IADL. As global cognitive scores did not predict the more variable IADL impairment, these findings suggest that measures of higher executive attention are more sensitive to IADL, and may better inform clinicians and caregivers of potential difficulty with daily tasks faced by patients with early AD.

  • The Impact of Trial Consultants on Perceptions of Procedural Justice and Juror Verdicts: An Empirical Investigation

    Author:
    Jennifer Katz
    Year of Dissertation:
    2011
    Program:
    Psychology
    Advisor:
    Harold Goldstein
    Abstract:

    Despite the proliferation of the trial consulting industry in recent years, we know virtually nothing about the impact that the use of a trial consultant may have on a jury. This laboratory study seeks to fill some of the gaps in the trial consulting literature by using the principles of procedural justice to explore what, if any, impact the use of a trial consultant can have on the outcome of a criminal jury trial, as well as the possibility that perceptions of fairness mediate the relationship between the balance of trial consultants and juror verdicts in cases where the evidence is ambiguous. Two hundred fifty-five jury-eligible individuals recruited from the participant pool of the psychology and management departments at Baruch College were asked to complete three questionnaires following the random assignment to a case summary that had been manipulated with respect to evidence strength (SOE) and use of a trial consultant. Hypotheses predicted that (a) a trial would be perceived as being higher in neutrality and global fairness if both the prosecution and defense used a trial consultant than if only one party used a trial consultant, (b) the likelihood of conviction would be highest when the evidence favored the prosecution, moderate when the evidence was ambiguous, and lowest when the evidence favored the defense, (c) the likelihood of conviction would be impacted by an interaction between SOE and balance of trial consultants such that when the evidence is ambiguous and both sides use a trial consultant, the likelihood of conviction would be higher than when the prosecution alone used a trial consultant but lower than when the defendant alone used a trial consultant, and (d) the relationship between the balance of trial consultants and likelihood of conviction would be mediated by perceptions of neutrality and global fairness when the evidence was ambiguous. Results supported the hypothesized relationship between SOE and likelihood of conviction, but there was only weak to moderate support for the relationship between the balance of trial consultants and perceptions of fairness. No significant interaction or mediation was found among the variables. Implications for the fields of procedural justice and trial consulting are discussed.