Alumni Dissertations

 

Alumni Dissertations

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  • AUDITORY PROCESSING OF COMPLEX TONES IN NEWBORN INFANTS

    Year of Dissertation:
    2010
    Program:
    Biology
    Advisor:
    BERNARD KARMEL
    Abstract:

  • AUDITORY PROCESSING OF COMPLEX TONES IN NEWBORN INFANTS

    Year of Dissertation:
    2010
    Program:
    Biology
    Advisor:
    BERNARD KARMEL
    Abstract:

  • AUDITORY PROCESSING OF COMPLEX TONES IN NEWBORN INFANTS

    Year of Dissertation:
    2010
    Program:
    Biology
    Advisor:
    BERNARD KARMEL
    Abstract:

  • AUDITORY PROCESSING OF COMPLEX TONES IN NEWBORN INFANTS

    Year of Dissertation:
    2010
    Program:
    Biology
    Advisor:
    BERNARD KARMEL
    Abstract:

  • Cologne Carnival's "Alternative" Stunksitzung: Carnivalization? Meta-Carnival? Or Bakhtinian Restoration?

    Author:
    Erik Abbott
    Year of Dissertation:
    2014
    Program:
    Theatre
    Advisor:
    Marvin Carlson
    Abstract:

    In the 1820s, Carnival in Cologne, Germany, underwent a series of reforms, ostensibly to bring the festival back to the people. Among the traditions that developed was the Sitzung, a theatrical variety-show event, with music, comic speeches and sketches, dance troupes, and various additional Carnival-related entertainments. The shows, and Carnival itself were, and largely have been since that time, mostly overseen by a Festival Committee and the official Carnival Societies it recognizes. In 1984, a group of mostly students decided to create their own version of a Sitzung, an alternative version, the Stunksitzung. From three inaugural performances, it has grown to presenting over forty performances a year to sell-out crowds of one thousand people per night and to being a popular annual television event. This dissertation considers the history of the Stunksitzung within a frame of Mikhail Bakhtin's work on Carnival. I examine over two-dozen performance pieces of the Ensemble, and compare and situate the production and its history within Cologne Carnival, in particular the broader dichotomous status of the official versus the alternative, interrogating how alternative the production is, has been, and continues to be. Ultimately, I frame the Stunksitzung within the larger context of Carnival and the particular status it holds in Cologne.

  • ANALYSIS AND IMPLEMENTATION OF SIGNAL PROCESSING STRATEGIES FOR A 3-D DOPPLER LIDAR WIND PROFILER

    Author:
    Sameh Abdelazim
    Year of Dissertation:
    2012
    Program:
    Engineering
    Advisor:
    Sam Ahmed
    Abstract:

    A heterodyne detection fiber optic based wind lidar system has been developed and tested, which benefits from unique field programmable gate array (FPGA) signal processing techniques and leverages devices from the telecommunication industry to make it particularly cost efficient. A narrow band stabilized fiber laser, polarization maintaining fiber amplifiers, acousto-optic modulators and an optical circulator comprise the transmitter which is coupled to free space using refractive optics. The collinear propagating lidar return signal that scatters off of atmospheric aerosols and in a heterodyne arrangement beats with a local oscillator and is then detected using a shot noise limited polarization maintaining balanced receiver. The system, which operates at a 20 kHz pulse repetition rate and acquires lidar return signals at 400 MSample/second, accumulates signals that are as much as 20 dB lower than the receiver noise power by using embedded programming techniques. For this reason two FPGA embedded programming approaches are considered and compared. In the first approach, the acquired return signal is gated in time and the square modulus of the fast Fourier transform is accumulated for each range gate, producing a series of power spectra as a function of range. Wind speed estimates based on numerical estimators can then be made after transferring the range gated accumulated power spectra to a host computer, enabling line of sight wind speed to be calculated as a function of range gate and stored for additional processing. In the second FPGA approach, a digital IQ demodulator and down sampler reduces the data flow requirements so that an autocorrelation matrix representing a pre-selected number of lags can be accumulated, allowing for the process of range gating to be explored on the host computer. The Fourier transform of the autocorrelation produces the power spectrum and, in the same manner as the first approach, estimates can then be made regarding the line of sight wind speed. The added feature of the second approach is that it allows for an additional capability to adjust the range gate period dynamically as the state of the atmospheric boundary layer (e.g. backscatter coefficient and stability condition) changes. A simple manual beam scanning technique is used to sample three line of sight directions and, by making suitable assumptions regarding the coherence of the averaged wind fields, the three dimensional wind field vector (representing both the horizontal wind speed and direction and the vertical wind speed and direction) is calculated and graphically displayed on time-height cross section plots. Precision in the velocity measurements is estimated to be on the order of 0.08 m/sec and the precision in the measured horizontal wind direction is estimated to be to be about 2 degrees, where both of these estimates are made assuming a relatively short 3-beam cycle time (less than 2 minutes) and a typical backscatter coefficient and atmospheric stability condition. A comparison to other observed wind information is presented which indicates that this lidar will open new doors for the practical characterization of microscale meteorology.

  • Prosodic Phrasing and Modifier Attachment in Standard Arabic Sentence Processing

    Author:
    Hala Abdelghany
    Year of Dissertation:
    2010
    Program:
    Linguistics
    Advisor:
    Janet Fodor
    Abstract:

    This dissertation investigates the syntax-prosody interface in Standard Arabic, focusing on the ambiguity of a modifier (relative clause or adjective phrase) in relation to the two nouns in a complex noun phrase. Ambiguity resolution tendencies for this construction differ across languages, contrary to otherwise universal parsing tendencies. One explanation proposed is Fodor's (2000) Implicit Prosody Hypothesis: that readers mentally project onto a text a default prosodic phrasing (possibly different between languages), which then influences their syntactic ambiguity resolution. Since implicit (silent) prosody cannot be directly observed, previous research has had to infer it by analogy with overt prosody. But the phonology and orthography of SA permit use of novel methods for tapping into the silent prosody of readers. Liaison phenomena sensitive to prosodic boundaries make phonological phrasing in SA very easy to detect. Also, liaison is indicated by diacritics in the `vowelized' version of SA orthography. Thus, clear data on prosodic phrasing patterns in SA complex nominals can be related to their preferred syntactic/semantic interpretations. Six experiments are reported: three production experiments and three perception experiments. Participants in Experiment 4 silently read sentences in unvowelized orthography, and added diacritics as they thought appropriate. The inserted diacritics gave evidence of their implicit prosodic phrasing of the sentence. Experiments 5 and 6 investigated Arabic speakers' preferred overt prosodic phrasing when the modifier was forced to attach to either the lower or the higher noun, providing standards for comparison with the prosodic phrasing preferences in silent reading in Experiment 4. The orthography was put to a different use in assessing modifier interpretation under varying prosodic conditions. In Experiments 2 and 3, vowelized text was presented, establishing one or other of two relevant prosodic patterns. Participants read aloud, and then indicated their interpretation of the sentence. This provided standards for comparison with modifier interpretation (attachment preferences) in silent reading of unvowelized texts (lacking prosodic disambiguation) in Experiment 1. Results obtained from these experiments provide new information concerning the constraints that apply at the syntax-prosody interface in SA, and also support the hypothesis of an effect of implicit prosody on syntactic interpretation during silent reading.

  • Prosodic Phrasing and Modifier Attachment in Standard Arabic Sentence Processing

    Author:
    Hala Abdelghany
    Year of Dissertation:
    2010
    Program:
    Linguistics
    Advisor:
    Janet Fodor
    Abstract:

    This dissertation investigates the syntax-prosody interface in Standard Arabic, focusing on the ambiguity of a modifier (relative clause or adjective phrase) in relation to the two nouns in a complex noun phrase. Ambiguity resolution tendencies for this construction differ across languages, contrary to otherwise universal parsing tendencies. One explanation proposed is Fodor's (2000) Implicit Prosody Hypothesis: that readers mentally project onto a text a default prosodic phrasing (possibly different between languages), which then influences their syntactic ambiguity resolution. Since implicit (silent) prosody cannot be directly observed, previous research has had to infer it by analogy with overt prosody. But the phonology and orthography of SA permit use of novel methods for tapping into the silent prosody of readers. Liaison phenomena sensitive to prosodic boundaries make phonological phrasing in SA very easy to detect. Also, liaison is indicated by diacritics in the `vowelized' version of SA orthography. Thus, clear data on prosodic phrasing patterns in SA complex nominals can be related to their preferred syntactic/semantic interpretations. Six experiments are reported: three production experiments and three perception experiments. Participants in Experiment 4 silently read sentences in unvowelized orthography, and added diacritics as they thought appropriate. The inserted diacritics gave evidence of their implicit prosodic phrasing of the sentence. Experiments 5 and 6 investigated Arabic speakers' preferred overt prosodic phrasing when the modifier was forced to attach to either the lower or the higher noun, providing standards for comparison with the prosodic phrasing preferences in silent reading in Experiment 4. The orthography was put to a different use in assessing modifier interpretation under varying prosodic conditions. In Experiments 2 and 3, vowelized text was presented, establishing one or other of two relevant prosodic patterns. Participants read aloud, and then indicated their interpretation of the sentence. This provided standards for comparison with modifier interpretation (attachment preferences) in silent reading of unvowelized texts (lacking prosodic disambiguation) in Experiment 1. Results obtained from these experiments provide new information concerning the constraints that apply at the syntax-prosody interface in SA, and also support the hypothesis of an effect of implicit prosody on syntactic interpretation during silent reading.

  • MIDDLEWARE ROUTING ALGORITHMS COMPONENTS FOR MOBILE AD-HOC WIRELESS NETWORKS

    Author:
    Yousef Abdelmalek
    Year of Dissertation:
    2010
    Program:
    Engineering
    Advisor:
    Tarek Saadawi
    Abstract:

    In this research, we introduce middleware routing algorithms components for Mobile Ad-hoc Networks (MANETs). Unlike the conventional networks, MANET is a decentralized radio wireless network that can be established in situation where no infrastructure exists or where deployment of infrastructure is expensive or inconvenient. This inherent flexibility makes it attractive for applications such as military operations, vehicle to vehicle networks, sensor networks, etc. Hence, MANETs require special type of routing algorithms to operate efficiently in such dynamic environment (i.e., wireless channel, bandwidth constrains, nodes resources, etc ...). In this thesis, we propose an add-on generic solution to on-demand ad-hoc routing protocols to enhance the routing protocols performance with minimum control overhead. Our Solution, namely, Destination Assisted Routing Enhancement (DARE), is based on the new idea of transmitting frequent destination beacon packets. These beacon packets are able to refresh the routing cache tables and announce the destination node existence. This methodology results in dramatically minimizing the initialization (learning/optimization) connection set-time as well as the network overhead. Comparison v between the traditional Dynamic Source Routing protocol (DSR) and the DSR with DARE (DSR-DARE) are presented to show the potential of DARE middleware. Second, we propose middleware protocol components in order to improve the real-time applications at the receivers' side; we propose an algorithm that gives the receiver dynamic ability to move from one multicast session to another based on the receiver capabilities and the path conditions leading to it. Our Multicast Multi-Stream (MMS) solution is added as an extension to the traditional Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) protocol. Then, we present cooperative video caching technique in MANETs in order to reduce the average access latency as well as enhance the video accessibility. Efficient video caching placement and replacement strategies are developed at some of the distributed intermediate nodes across the network. The simulations results have shown that the system has better video perception (i.e. Quality of Service).

  • MIDDLEWARE ROUTING ALGORITHMS COMPONENTS FOR MOBILE AD-HOC WIRELESS NETWORKS

    Author:
    Yousef Abdelmalek
    Year of Dissertation:
    2010
    Program:
    Engineering
    Advisor:
    Tarek Saadawi
    Abstract:

    In this research, we introduce middleware routing algorithms components for Mobile Ad-hoc Networks (MANETs). Unlike the conventional networks, MANET is a decentralized radio wireless network that can be established in situation where no infrastructure exists or where deployment of infrastructure is expensive or inconvenient. This inherent flexibility makes it attractive for applications such as military operations, vehicle to vehicle networks, sensor networks, etc. Hence, MANETs require special type of routing algorithms to operate efficiently in such dynamic environment (i.e., wireless channel, bandwidth constrains, nodes resources, etc ...). In this thesis, we propose an add-on generic solution to on-demand ad-hoc routing protocols to enhance the routing protocols performance with minimum control overhead. Our Solution, namely, Destination Assisted Routing Enhancement (DARE), is based on the new idea of transmitting frequent destination beacon packets. These beacon packets are able to refresh the routing cache tables and announce the destination node existence. This methodology results in dramatically minimizing the initialization (learning/optimization) connection set-time as well as the network overhead. Comparison v between the traditional Dynamic Source Routing protocol (DSR) and the DSR with DARE (DSR-DARE) are presented to show the potential of DARE middleware. Second, we propose middleware protocol components in order to improve the real-time applications at the receivers' side; we propose an algorithm that gives the receiver dynamic ability to move from one multicast session to another based on the receiver capabilities and the path conditions leading to it. Our Multicast Multi-Stream (MMS) solution is added as an extension to the traditional Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) protocol. Then, we present cooperative video caching technique in MANETs in order to reduce the average access latency as well as enhance the video accessibility. Efficient video caching placement and replacement strategies are developed at some of the distributed intermediate nodes across the network. The simulations results have shown that the system has better video perception (i.e. Quality of Service).