Alumni Dissertations

 

Alumni Dissertations

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  • The Lived Experience of Caring Presence for Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty

    Author:
    Valerie Taylor-Haslip
    Year of Dissertation:
    2013
    Program:
    Nursing Studies
    Advisor:
    Donna Nickitas
    Abstract:

    Abstract THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF CARING PRESENCE FOR NURSING FACULTY AND NURSING STUDENTS by Valerie Taylor-Haslip, MS, RN, FNP Adviser: Professor Donna M. Nickitas The lived experience of caring-presence phenomenon may have meaning for nursing faculty and nursing students, but is not sufficiently researched in the discipline of nursing. This hermeneutic phenomenological qualitative study is designed to understand the lived experience of caring presence within the context of the nursing faculty and nursing student relationship. Nine full time tenure track nursing faculty and six full time clinical nursing students participated, by means of in-depth interviews describing the meaning of caring presence within a nursing faculty-nursing student relationship. The van Manen phenomenological approach was used as the applied methodology for interpretation and reflection of the findings for this study. The findings of the study reveal caring-presence is a distinct phenomenon with five interconnected essential themes that illuminate the experience. Paterson and Zderad's Humanistic Nursing Theory and Jean Watson's Transpersonal Caring Relationship were used as a framework to reflect upon the findings. The research findings have implications for continued research in the development of caring-presence as a concept and as a phenomenon. The implications for nursing education include development of pedagogical approaches, teaching and learning strategies, and caring science curriculum development based upon the caring-presence relationship of nursing faculty and nursing students. The caring-presence relationship between nursing faculty and nursing students transforms both the faculty and the student.

  • The Effect of an Educational Model, Developing Nurses' Thinking (DNT), on Nursing Students' Accurate Diagnoses of Patients' Responses to Health Problems

    Author:
    Mary Tesoro
    Year of Dissertation:
    2011
    Program:
    Nursing Studies
    Advisor:
    Margaret Lunney
    Abstract:

    Abstract The Effect of an Educational Model, Developing Nurses' Thinking (DNT), on Nursing Students' Accurate Diagnoses of Patients' Responses to Health Problems By Mary G. McCaffery Tesoro This was a quasi-experimental study, pretest and posttest design, to determine whether use of the Developing Nurses' Thinking (DNT) model during two weeks of clinical post conferences improved nursing students' diagnostic accuracy. The DNT model integrates four constructs, patient safety, domain knowledge, critical thinking processes, and repeated practice, to guide students' thinking when interpreting patient data and developing effective plans of care. Two accompanying worksheets helped students to operationalize the model and provided guidance for thinking processes. Students (N = 83) from two baccalaureate degree programs in the first clinical nursing courses volunteered to participate in the study. Two sets of two parallel case studies were developed for the pretest and posttest and validated by three experienced faculty. Diagnostic accuracy was measured on a seven point scale using the Lunney Scoring Method. Statistical analyses included independent t - test, paired t - test, and general linear regression modeling. The results were that both groups of students varied widely in accuracy of nursing diagnosis. The hypothesis was supported in that the intervention group had statistically significant improvement in accuracy posttest scores compared to those in the control group. The results were consistent with previous studies that accuracy varied and use of a teaching aid such as the DNT model helped nursing students to improve accuracy. The implications are that use of a model that integrates the constructs of patient safety, domain knowledge, critical thinking process, and repeated practice, the DNT model, may help nursing students to develop effective thinking habits in the context of patient safety and improve diagnostic accuracy.

  • The Lived Experience of Puerto Rican Single Mothers Raising Children in a Violent Community

    Author:
    Mirian Zavala
    Year of Dissertation:
    2012
    Program:
    Nursing Studies
    Advisor:
    Keville Frederickson
    Abstract:

    The Live Experience of Puerto Rican Single Mothers Raising Children in a Violent Community by Mirian Zavala, M.S.N., R.N. Advisor: Professor Keville Frederickson The prevalence of single mothers in the United States continues to increase. Adding to the pressures of single mothering is raising their children in a violent community. In the Bronx, where this study was conducted, Hispanics now represent more than 51% of the population up from 48.4% in 2000. In 2004, nation-wide, 26.6% of the Hispanics of Puerto Rican descent lived in single parent households. The lived experience of Puerto Rican single mothers was examined using qualitative research based on van Manen's method. Each of the five participants were interviewed and told their story about living as a Puerto Rican single mother raising their children in a violent community. The six themes that emerged were: protection, family and friends, portending doom, belief in God, carrying extra loads, and turning points. The transformed essence that emerged was that Puerto Rican single mothers raised their children in a violent community by: protecting and monitoring their children's whereabouts through portending doom. They cope with bad situations by relying on family and friends, believing in God, carrying extra loads, and creating turning points. The nursing model, the RAM, was integrated into the essence statement, which stated that these women were able to adapt to a life of needing to protect their children, and the use of family and/or trusted neighbors in order to raise their children in a violent community by making positive choices at turning points. By portending doom rather than denying the events of the environment, they were able to protect themselves and their children. The belief in God, as a philosophical approach to their reality, provided a link between the Puerto Rican single mothers who were raising their children in a violent community and the concept of adaptation.