Art History: Faculty Honors, Awards, Publications, and Other Activities: 2012

Jennifer Ball was a contributor to Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition, ed. Helen C. Evans with Brandie Ratliffe (Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2012). She presented at the Colloquium of the Inter-University Doctoral Consortium in Medieval Studies, Princeton University, in April 2012 and at the Byzantine Studies Conference in Chicago in October 2011. In addition, Jennifer chaired a session at the International Congress of Medieval Studies that was sponsored by Medieval Studies at the Graduate Center, “Monastic Inc.: Expressions of Group Identity in Medieval Monasteries.” 

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In June 2012, Emily Braun concluded her five-year tenure as Chair of the Art History Program and Deputy Chair, Department of Art, Hunter College. She coedited, with Michelangelo Sabatino, Italia Barbara: Primitives from Piero to Pasolini, a special issue of The Journal of Modern Italian Studies (JMIS vol. 17, June 2012) and was the sole author of the Introduction, “Italia Barbara: Primitives from Piero to Pasolini.” As a contributing author (“Saturday Evenings at the Steins”) to The Steins Collect (Yale University Press, 2011) she was a corecipient of the first annual Robert Motherwell Book Award given by the Dedalus Foundation (2012). The book was also selected for a 2011 Choice Award (American Library Association) for Outstanding Academic Title in the Fine Arts category.

Prof. Braun's public lectures included “The Stein Salons in Context: Rosa Fitzjames and Natalie Barney” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in April 2012 and “The Trauma of Painting: Tactility and Empathy in the Sacchi of Albert Burri” for the symposium Touch and the Visual Arts: Neuroscience, Art, and Art History, organized by the Brain Science Institute at Johns Hopkins and the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore in March 2012. She was also an invited respondent for two symposia: “New Directions in Italian and Italian-American History: Conference in Honor of Philip Cannistraro,” at the John D. Calandra Institute, CUNY, in November 2011 and “Thresholds: Place and Margin in Italian Visual Culture 1950s–Present” at Hunter College in April 2012.

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This past year, Anna Chave’s publishing included contributions to exhibition catalogs in “Brancusi’s Masquerade: Social Standing, Self-Image, and Photographic Im/Posture” in Constantin Brancusi: Masterpieces from Romanian Museums, ex. cat. (rev. ed.) (Gagosian Gallery, 2011) and “Pat Steir’s Flow” in Pat Steir, ex. cat. (Locks Gallery, 2011). Her published articles include “The Guerrilla Girls’ Reckoning,” Art Journal 70, no. 2 (Summer 2011); Reply to Letter to the Editor regarding “The Guerrilla Girls’ Reckoning,” Art Journal 70, no. 3 (Fall 2011); Review of Elissa Auther, String Felt Thread: The Hierarchy of Art and Craft in American Art, 2010, in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 36:3 (Spring 2011); and Statement in M/E/A/N/I/N/G Online #5, 25th anniversary edition (2011) http://writing.upenn.edu/epc/meaning/05/. The statement in M/E/A/N/I/N/G is a brief memoir about her experience teaching in the immediate aftermath of 9/11. She also wrote “My Asian Students,” in Eunhee Yang, ed., Experiences: Asian Women in Global Culture, Incheon (Korea): Incheon Women Artists’ Biennale Organizing Committee, 2011 (in Korean and English). All titles are available for download at www.annachave.com.

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Romy Golan published “Eclissi: arte italiana negli anni 60,” in Il confine evenescente: Arte Italiana 1960-2010, Gabriele Guercio and Anna Mattirolo eds. (Electa, 2010); « La possibilità di un fotomurale socialista, » in Memoria e ricerca (Summer 2010); “La possibilité d’un photomural socialiste,” in Artistes et partis dans la première moitié du vingtième siècle en Europe, Maria Stavrinaki and Maddalena Carli, eds., (Presses du Réel, 2012); “Timely/Untimely: a modern mosaic,” in The Beauty of Japheth in the Tents of Shem: Studies in Honor of Mordechai Homer, Assaph: Studies in Art History 13-14 (2010); “Le mural rétif,” in La Tapisserie hier et aujourd’hui (École du Louvre, 2011); and “Chronicle of a Disappearance Foretold,” in Interspaces: Art + Architectural Exchanges from East to West, University of Melbourne, Australia (2012).

She reviewed the exhibition Pistoletto: From One to Many 1956-1974 (held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and MAXXI in Rome) for Artforum, February 2011; Karen Fiss’s book Grand Illusion: The Third Exposition, and the Cultural Seduction of France for Modernism/Modernity 17, no. 3 (October 2010); and “Futurism Redux,” a review of Futurism: An Anthology, ed. Lawrence Rayney et al., also for Modernism/Modernity 17, no. 1 (January 2010).

In the spring of  2010 Prof. Golan gave a Sylberberg Lecture titled “Mirror Images/Eclipses: Italian art in the 1960s” at the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU; a discussion of her recent book Muralnomad for the Paris-based research group “Relire l’entre deux-guerre” at the Musée des Années 30 in June 2010; during the summer of 2010, the keynote address for the conference “Interspaces: Art+Architectural Exchanges from East to West” at the University of Melbourne; and a conversation with Greg Castillo on his new book Cold War on the Home Front: The Soft Power of Midcentury Design (2010) at the University of Sydney; a lecture entitled “Portable murals” at the Jose Guerrero Museum in Granada, Spain; and “The transmedial thirties” at the conference “Encounters with the 1930s," Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid, 2011. At the Graduate Center she chaired the panel “Triumph of Pop” for the Center for the Humanities and gave a talk, “Other Rooms, Other Voices” on the occasion of the exhibition The Making of Americans at the GC's James Art Gallery. In the last year she has cocurated Encuentros con los años 30 at Museo Reina Sofia and contributed the essay “The World Fair: A Transmedial Theatre” to its catalogue (the exhibition opens in October 2012).

Her book Muralnomad: The Paradox of Wall Painting, Europe 1926-1956 (Yale University Press, 2009) was reviewed in Art History, Art in America, Cahiers du Musée National d’Art Moderne, Casabella, CAA online reviews.

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Mona Hadler’s publications include “David Hare, Surrealism, and the Comics,” The Space Between: Literature and Culture, 1914-1945, VII: 1 (December 2011); and “Lee Bontecou: Animals, Bodies, Machines,” a presentation at the College Art Association, Los Angeles, February, 2012. Mona was named Honorary Phi Beta Kappa in May, 2012.

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Cynthia Hahn’s “big book on reliquaries” is appearing in August: Strange Beauty: Origins and Issues in the Making of Medieval Reliquaries 400–circa 1204 (Penn State Press, 2012), developed through many seminars, including an excellent one at the Graduate Center. It can be purchased at: http://www.psupress.org/books/titles/978-0-271-05078-2.html. She was busy this past spring, delivering among others a Rewald Seminar and the  Katherine Brown Distinguished Lecture at UT Austin, as well as a keynote address at the Imago conference in Tel Aviv. She will be on leave next year, enjoying a CASVA fellowship in Washington, D.C. (watching presidential politics perched six stories above the mall), and writing the “small book on reliquaries” for Reaktion Books. She is honored to have been elected as a Councilor for the Medieval Academy.
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Anna Indych-López coauthored Diego Rivera: Murals for The Museum of Modern Art (Museum of Modern Art, 2011), a book that accompanied the eponymous exhibition at MoMA (November 2011–May 2012). Her Fall 2011 seminar on Mexican Muralism at the GC was based on this exhibition. In conjunction with the MoMA exhibition, she participated in the symposium “Diego Rivera:  Public Art and Politics in Mexico, the Soviet Union, and the United States,” at the Institute of Fine Arts, NYU, in March 2012. At the CAA conference in February 2012, she chaired the Association for Latin American Art–sponsored session “Photographic Practices in Latin America.” She also participated in two Getty-sponsored initiatives: in “Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945–1980” by contributing an essay on Alfredo Ramos Martínez to the exhibition catalogue MEX/LA: Mexican Modernism(s) in Los Angeles 1930–1985 (Museum of Latin American Art, 2011) and by participating in the symposium “Between Theory and Practice: Rethinking Latin American Art in the 21st Century” at the Museo de Arte de Lima, Peru, in November 2011.

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Rachel Kousser was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship (2011–12). She published “The Female Nude in Classical Art:  Between Voyeurism and Power” in the exhibition catalog Aphrodite and the Gods of Love (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, June 2011). Her invited lectures include “The Use and Abuse of Images in Ancient Greece” at the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology, University of California at Los Angeles, Spring 2012; and “Aphrodite and the Female Nude” at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Fall 2011.

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Gail Levin’s Lee Krasner: A Biography appeared in paperback, published by William Morrow in March 2012. Other publications include: “Aaron Copland’s America,” in Making Music for Modern Dance: Collaboration in the Formative Years of a New American Art, ed. Katherine Teck (Oxford University Press, 2011); “Judy Chicago in Fresno,” in Entering the Picture: Judy Chicago, the Fresno Feminist Art Program and the Collective Visions of Women Artists, ed. Jill Fields (Routledge Press, 2011); “The Extraordinary Interventions of Alfonso Ossorio, Patron and Collector of Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner” and “Alfonso Ossorio and Zen,” in Archives of American Art Journal, vol. 50, nos. 1–2 (Spring 2011). Gail’s public presentations included “Anti-Heroic Images in Contemporary American Art,” at a conference at the University of Udine, Italy, June 13, 2011; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, November 9, 2011; Hyman and Freda Bernstein Jewish Literary Festival, JCC, Washington, D.C., October 23, 2011; Ball State University Museum of Art, Muncie, Ind., October 30, 2011; Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, October 15, 2011; Hampton Library, Fridays at Five Lecture Series, Bridgehampton, N.Y., August 12, 2011; Annual Pollock-Krasner Lecture, Guild Hall Museum of Art, July 17, 2011. She is currently lecturing in Beijing, China.

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Rose-Carol Washton Long presented a paper, “Is the Blaue Reiter Relevant for the Twenty-First Century?” at the Blaue Reiter Centenary Symposium at the Tate Modern, London, in November 2011. Her essay “Brücke, German Expressionism and the Issue of Modernism” was published in New Perspectives on Brücke Expressionism: Bridging History, ed. Christian Weikop (Ashgate, 2011).
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In the 2011–2012 academic year, John V. Maciuika completed a three-year term as a book review editor for modern architecture for the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, and a three-year term as president of the New York Metropolitan Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians. He lectured on the politics of historical reconstruction at the University of Vilnius, Lithuania, and as part of the keynote panel of a historic preservation conference in Tallinn, Estonia. His article “Whose Schlossplatz? Architecture and the ‘Materialization’ of German Identities in Berlin's Historic Center, 1945–2009” appeared in the Bulletin of the German Historical Institute and, expanded and translated, in the Polish journal Herito: Heritage, Culture, and the Present.
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Katherine Manthorne spent Fall 2011 in Germany as Professor of American Art, John F. Kennedy Institute, Free University, Berlin. While there she organized a conference titled “European Perspectives on American Art” and participated in others including the American Studies Research Colloquium and Winold Reiss Conference (both Berlin) and “Nature’s Nation Revisited, University of Tübingen, Germany. She was an adviser for and presenter at the conference Encuentros: Artistic Exchange between the United States & Latin America, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C. Her essay “Eliza Pratt Greatorex: Becoming a Landscape Painter” appeared in The Cultured Canvas: New Perspectives on American Landscape Painting, ed. Nancy J. Siegel (University Press of New England, 2011). In spring she curated the exhibition and authored the accompanying catalogue Worlds Between: The Landscapes of Louis Rémy Mignot (Thomas Cole House, 2012). She also contributed to Caribbean: Art at the Crossroads of the World (Yale University Press, 2012). Katherine organized a roundtable called Ambas Americas for the College Art Association, and a panel for New York’s Salmagundi Club in April. Her spring seminar on Traveler Artists to Latin America focused on the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros.

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Kevin Murphy published Jonathan Fisher of Blue Hill, Maine: Commerce, Culture and Community on the Eastern Frontier (University of Massachusetts Press, 2010); “The Vernacular Moment: Eleanor Raymond, Walter Gropius, and New England Modernism between the Wars,” Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 70, no. 3 (September 2011); and “The Historic Building in the Modernized City: The Cathedrals of Paris and Rouen in the Nineteenth Century,” Journal of Urban History 37 (March 2011).  He cochaired two panels at the 2012 CAA meeting in Los Angeles on “Ephemera and the Making of Urban Space.”

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In February 2012, Eloise Quiñones-Keber was an invited speaker for an international symposium, “From Teotihuacan to Tenochtitlan: A Cultural Continuum in Mesoamerica,” held at California State University, Los Angeles. Her topic was “Santiago in Spain and New Spain.” She cochaired the session “Guiding Souls: Images of the Virgin Mary and the Saints in the Viceroyalties of New Spain and Peru” at the Renaissance Society of America’s Annual Meeting in March 2012 in Washington, D.C., where she spoke on “Santiago in Tlatelolco, Mexico.” For the NEH summer institute “Mesoamerica and the Southwest: A New History for an Ancient Land,” held in Mexico City, she was invited to present two seminars: one on “16th-Century Accounts of Religion and Ritual in Aztec Society” and another on “Representing Religion and Ritual in Aztec Art.” She also cochaired a session on “Visual Dialogues of Power in the Viceroyalties of New Spain and Peru” at the 54th International Congress of Americanists in Vienna in July, where she spoke on “Indigenous Empowerment in 16th-Century Mexican Missions.” At Baruch College she was student-nominated for the 2011–2012 Outstanding Honors Teaching Award.

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While continuing to revise her book manuscript provisionally titled Sex-Politics UK: Dream-Works of the Avant-Garde, this academic year Siona Wilson has published book reviews in Parallax (Michael Fried’s Why Photography Matters as Art as Never Before) and caa.reviews (Cornelia Butler and Alexandra Schwartz’s Modern Women: Women Artists at the Museum of Modern Art). She has also written exhibition reviews of Simone Gilges, Gregory Halpern, Uta Barth, Ciprian Muresan, and B. Wurtz for Art Review. She presented a paper and participated in a panel discussion at the King Juan Carlos Center of Spain at New York University (cohosted by the Americas Society), “Contemporary Photographic Practice: Memory, Archive, and Document,” together with Oliver Lutz and Milagros de la Torre. She also gave a keynote address at Indiana University at Bloomington titled “Working Through War: Aesthetic Repetitions and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Art.”

Submitted on: JUL 30, 2012

Category: Art History, Faculty Activities, Faculty Awards