Joshua Brown Wins NEH Fellowship

“Maryland and Pennsylvania farmers visiting the battle-field of Antietam,” 1862 wood engraving based on a sketch by artist-reporter Frank H. Schell published in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper.

Joshua Brown, director of the American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning and a member of the doctoral faculty in history and interactive technology and pedagogy, has won a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) research fellowship of $25,000 to support the writing of a book with the tentative title “Studies in the Visual Culture of the American Civil War,” for six months in 2014. The support comes from the NEH’s Division of Research Programs.

According to Brown, his study “will provide new information to enhance scholarship in related disciplines as it also offers historians an example of sound methodology for the incorporation of visual evidence.” In the book’s five interrelated chapters, topics will include the visual reportage of the Confederate war efforts, the pictorial record of the July 1863 New York City Draft Riots, the proliferation and evolution of political cartoons during the Civil War, and the visual depiction of the Civil War in key European news periodicals and prints.

The book project is an outgrowth of thirty years of wide-ranging research, writing, media production, and teaching. His current research has taken him, or will take him to numerous archives, including those at the New York Public Library; the New-York Historical Society; the American Antiquarian Society; the Library Company of Philadelphia; the Library of Congress, National Archives, and National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.; the Harvard Houghton Library in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Support for these years comes from a 2011 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, an AAS Drawn to Art Research Fellowship, a Professional Staff Congress–City University of New York Research Award, and from the Graduate Center.

Submitted on: DEC 7, 2012

Category: American Social History Project - Center for Media and Learning, Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, History, Faculty Awards