Press Release: November Public Programs

The City University of New York Graduate Center announces the following public programs to be held during the month of November at the Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue at 34th Street. For further information about the Graduate Center and its public programs, visit www.gc.cuny.edu.

Through Saturday, January 8:

Deep Impressions: Willie Cole Works on Paper

(art exhibition) James Gallery, Tuesdays & Wednesdays, 12–8 PM; Thursdays–Saturdays, 12–6 PM

New Jersey artist Willie Cole is best known for sculptures that use American consumer and industrial detritus. Deep Impressions provides an intimate look at Cole's art through his works on paper and highlights his recent return to figurative, more overtly autobiographic subject matter. Presented by the James Gallery; free, for information call 212-817-7392.

Monday, November 1:

Made HERE: Performing Artists on Work & Life in NYC
(screening & panel discussion) 3:00–8:00 PM, Martin E. Segal Theatre
The Segal Center presents this program on MADE HERE, a new documentary series and website devoted to the challenging and eclectic lives of performing artists in New York City. View all MADE HERE episodes in a special afternoon screening and learn about the genesis of the project, and the myriad issues it addresses, in an evening discussion featuring Moira Brennan, program director of MAP Fund; Gabri Christa, filmmaker/choreographer; Andy Horwitz, curator at LMCC and founder of Culturebot.org; Mikeah Ernest Jennings, performer; Ginny Louloudes, executive director of A.R.T./New York; Helen Shaw, theater critic at Time Out New York; and Kim Whitener, producing director of HERE. Co-curated by Tanya Selvaratnam. Free, for more information call 212-817-1860.
 
The Stanley Burnshaw Lecture: Edward Hirsch
(discussion) 6:00 PM, Elebash Recital Hall
Edward Hirsch will present this year's Burnshaw lecture, titled "My Pace Provokes My Thoughts: Poetry and Walking." Given by distinguished poets and critics in honor of Stanley Burnshaw's literary career and contributions to New York intellectual life, this lecture is a joint project of the Center for the Humanities and the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin, which holds the papers of Stanley Burnshaw. Hirsch is a noted poet, president of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation in New York City, and author of the best-selling How to Read a Poem and Fall in Love with Poetry. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005.
 
Wednesday, November 3:

ITS @ the Graduate Center:
More Perfect Than We Imagined: A Physicist's View of Life
(discussion) 6:30–7:30 PM, Proshansky Auditorium
William Bialek is the John Archibald Wheeler/Battelle Professor in Physics at Princeton University and Visiting Presidential Professor of Physics at the Graduate Center, where he leads the Initiative for the Theoretical Sciences. He is a leading figure in the growing effort to bring the beautiful phenomena of life under the powerful predictive umbrella of theoretical physics. Bialek and his colleagues have shown that, in many cases, evolution has pushed living systems to operate at the limits of what the laws of physics allow, and they have followed these ideas from the first steps of embryonic development to the code that the brain uses in representing our sensory experience. This lecture will give us a glimpse of science at the frontier of our understanding, where physicists and biologists are collaborating -- and debating -- in an effort to tame the complexity of life. Free, but seating is limited and reservations are required. Reservations can be made at www.gc.cuny.edu/events. For further information, call 212-817-8215.
 
The Triumph of Pop
(discussion) 6:30 PM, Skylight Room
How and why did Americans and their European counterparts begin taking Pop art seriously? Seen at first as a byproduct of American consumer culture, Pop art eventually came to represent surprising new strategies for dissent, as readily as it reflected on the media, subculture, and kitsch. Join Annie Cohen-Solal, author of Leo and his Circle; Thomas Crow, author of The Rise of the Sixties: American and European Art in the Era of Dissent; Romy Golan, author of Muralnomad: The Mural Effect in European art 1927-57; and Michael Lobel, author of James Rosenquist: Pop Art, Politics, and History in the 1960's. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005.
 
New York City and the Spanish-Speaking World: Historical/Cultural Connections
(discussion) 6:30 PM, Elebash Recital Hall

Historian Mike Wallace (John Jay College & the Graduate Center) will moderate a panel that explores the impact on New York City, over the last two centuries, of cultural producers from the Spanish-speaking world. The panelists will discuss and display developments in: Latin American literature -- Carmen Boullosa (CCNY); film -- Jim Fernández (NYU); music -- Juan Flores (Graduate Center & Hunter College); Spanish literature -- Regina Galasso (BMCC); and Spanish and Latin-American art -- Edward Sullivan (NYU). Presented by the Gotham Center for New York City History. Tickets, which cost $8 ($6 members), may be purchased at www.gc.cuny.edu/events or by calling 212-868-4444. To join the Graduate Center's Membership Program and receive an instant 25% discount code visit the Graduate Center Membership page.
 
Thursday, November 4:

Music in Midtown: Elebash Piano Trio
(concert) 1:00 PM, Elebash Recital Hall

These young instrumentalists, all of whom have appeared nationally and internationally, will perform Tchaikovsky's deeply moving Trio in A Minor, op. 50 ("In Memory of a Great Artist"). This elegiac lament is written in memory of Nicholas Rubinstein, Tchaikovsky's trusted teacher and colleague. Members of the Elebash Piano Trio are Graduate Center D.M.A. chamber players William McNally, piano; Karen Rostron, violin; and Michael Haas, cello. Tickets, which cost $8 ($6 members), may be purchased at www.gc.cuny.edu/events or by calling 212-868-4444. To join the Graduate Center's Membership Program and receive an instant 25% discount code visit the Graduate Center Membership page.
 
Annual Jack Diggins Memorial Lecture
(discussion) 6:30 PM, Skylight Room

This annual lecture will commemorate John Patrick (Jack) Diggins, former Distinguished Professor of History at the Graduate Center. Professor Diggins wrote widely on American history from the Declaration of Independence through to the modern day, including studies of Ronald Reagan and Reinhold Niebuhr. The first lecture will be delivered by Dr. Mark A. Noll, Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. Dr. Noll’s books include, most recently, The New Shape of World Christianity: How American Experience Reflects Global Faith (2009) and God and Race in American Politics: A Short History (2008). His 1995 The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind was named Christianity Today's "Book of the Year" in 1996. In 2005 he was named by Time as one of the 25 most influential evangelicals in America. Noll was awarded a National Humanities Medal  in 2006. Free (first-come, first-served), for information, call 212-817-8215.
 
Monday, November 8:

The Audre Lorde/Essex Hemphill Memorial Lecture: Cheryl Clarke
(discussion) 6:00 PM, Skylight Room

Join Cheryl Clarke, author of four books of poetry and, most recently, After Mecca: Women Poets and the Black Arts Movement, for the second annual Lorde/Hemphill lecture. This lecture commemorates the lives of the American poets Audre Lorde (1934 -1992) and Essex Hemphill (1957 -1995) and encourages exciting scholarship and literary production within the communities to whom their poetry and prose spoke. Both Lorde and Hemphill were instrumental in the development of distinctive forms of writing among American poets, particularly people of color and members of the LGBT community. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for in formation call 212-817-2005.
 
African Choreographers in the US: Diasporas in Movement
(discussion) 6:30 PM, Martin E. Segal Theatre
The Segal Center partners with downtown dance nexus DNA (Dance New Amsterdam) for a look at new choreography from African choreographers working in the U.S. Contemporary dancemakers Nora Chipaumire of Zimbabwe, Souleyman Badolo of Burkina Faso, and Sduduzo Kambili of South Africa draw from their unique cultural heritage, diasporic journey, and urban American present to evolve a new language of movement and expression. DNA Executive Director Catherine Peila moderates. Free, for informatin call 212-817-1860
 
What Is the Future of Media?
(discussion) 7:00 PM, Proshansky Auditorium

The second fall Perspectives event, moderated by Peter Beinart, features Tina Brown, Andrew Sullivan, and Jeff Jarvis in conversation about the future of the media, and the way in which electronic publishing and the Internet, as a virtual space, are shaping the dissemination of the news and information in the world. Tickets, which cost $20 ($15 members), may be purchased at www.gc.cuny.edu/events or by calling 212-868-4444. To join the Graduate Center's Membership Program and receive an instant 25% discount code visit the Graduate Center Membership page.
 
Tuesday, November 9:

From Slavery to Poverty: The Racial Origins of Welfare in NY, 1840-1918
(discussion) 6:30 PM, Elebash Recital Hall

Author Gunja SenGupta (Brooklyn College), along with Pamela Newkirk (NYU) and Nikhil Pal Singh (NYU), will examine the more recent racially charged stereotype of the "welfare queen" and look back to its roots in language and institutions of poor relief and reform in the nineteenth century. Book signing to follow. Presented by the Gotham Center for New York City History. Tickets, which cost $8 ($6 members), may be purchased at www.gc.cuny.edu/events or by calling 212-868-4444. To join the Graduate Center's Membership Program and receive an instant 25% discount code visit the Graduate Center Membership page.
 
Thursday, November 11:

Tendencies: Poetics and Practice
(discussion) 7:00 PM, Skylight Room

This series of talks by and about major contemporary poets, curated by Tim Peterson (Trace) and titled in honor of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, explores the relationship between queer theory, poetic manifesto, poetic practice, and pedagogy. This month, Tendencies hosts poets Stephanie Gray, Dawn Lundy Martin, and Nathaniel Siegel. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005. The next “Tendencies: Poetics and Practice” event will take place on Monday, November 29, at 7:00 PM.

Monday, November 15:

An Evening with Playwright Mark Ravenhill (UK)
(readings & discussion) 6:30 PM, Martin E. Segal Theatre

The Segal Center welcomes acclaimed British playwright Mark Ravenhill (Shopping and F***ing, Some Explicit Polaroids, Shoot/Get Treasure/Repeat) for a special evening of readings and conversation. Ravenhill, most recently seen in New York as Bette Bourne's counterpoint in A Life in Three Acts (St. Ann's Warehouse), will read from recent monologues and discuss his work with Distinguished Professor Marvin Carlson (The Graduate Center, CUNY). Presented by the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center; free, for information call 212-817-1860.
 
Screening of The Searchers
(film screening) 7:00 PM, Proshansky Auditorium
Acclaimed documentarian Ken Burns has selected three films which he feels best speak to the theme of Place in America. The Searchers is the second screening in the series; the third will be a screening of Episode one of Treme, with a talk by Ken Burns (on December 9). The November 15 screening is free (first-come, first-served); for information call 212 817 8215.
 
Wednesday November 17:

Translating a Past that Haunts the Present
(discussion) 3:00 PM, Skylight Room

Acclaimed authors Jenny Erpenbeck and Philippe Claudel join their American translators, Susan Bernofsky and John Cullen, to discuss the delicate art of fictionalizing the fraught history of Germany and France during WWII in their novels Visitation and Brodeck and the translation of this history into English. The audience will be invited to try its hand at selected translation problems. Moderated by Susan Bernofsky, MFA Program in Writing and Translation, Queens College. This program is part of the 2010 New Literature from Europe Festival. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005.
 
The Life and Death of Honor: 15th Annual Irving Howe Memorial Lecture by Anthony Appiah
(discussion) 6:00 PM, Elebash Recital Hall

Established to honor the American literary critic and political writer Irving Howe, this endowed lecture addresses subjects that were of special interest to him, including political and social ideas, immigrant history, Jewish writing and culture, and the modern literary imagination. This year, Kwame Anthony Appiah, the Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Philosophy at Princeton University, will speak on "The Life and Death of Honor." His numerous books include the memoir In My Father's House; Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers (2006); and his most recent work, Experiments in Ethics (2008). Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005.
 
Thursday, November 18:

Music in Midtown: Manhattan String Quartet
(concert) 1:00 PM, Elebash Recital Hall

Described by the Boston Globe as "a national treasure," the Manhattan String Quartet has performed throughout the U.S., Europe, Canada, Mexico, and South America. The program will include Mozart's Adagio and Fugue in C minor, KV 546, and String Quartet no. 1, op. 7 (1905) by Arnold Schoenberg. Members of the group are Eric Lewis, violin; Calvin Wiersma, violin; John Dexter, viola; and Chris Finckel, cello. Tickets, which cost $8 ($6 members), may be purchased at www.gc.cuny.edu/events or by calling 212-868-4444. To join the Graduate Center's Membership Program and receive an instant 25% discount code visit the Graduate Center Membership page.
 
Monday, November 22:

Aurelia Thiérrée (France/NY): From Aurelia's Oratorio to Murmurs
(discussion) 6:30 PM, Martin E. Segal Theatre

Internationally acclaimed performing artist Aurelia Thiérrée discusses her unique approach to creating physical and image-based theatre. Thiérrée's enigmatic one-woman performance piece Aurelia's Oratorio has been touring across the US and around the world for seven years. The Guardian called it "Bewitching...Theatre is all about the suspension of disbelief: Thiérrée takes things one step further; she makes you think that you have seen what you have not seen." Thiérrée's newest work, Murmurs, also created in collaboration with and directed by Thiérrée's mother Victoria Thiérrée Chaplin, premieres in March 2011. Presented by the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center; free, for information call 212-817-1860.
 
Tuesday, November 23:

The Visual World of French Theory
6:30 PM, Martin E. Segal Theatre

Join Sarah Wilson as she speaks about her revelatory work on prominent French philosophers of the 1960s and 1970s -- including Sartre, Deleuze, Bourdieu, and Foucault -- and their encounters with the artists of their times, most particularly the protagonists of the Narrative Figuration movement. Wilson brings to life the intense and radical thinking of the period through this unique dialogue between the artists and writers of the time -- in critical texts and catalogue prefaces -- that illuminates not only the work of the artists but also the production of the philosopher-writer concerned. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; free, for information call 212-817-2005.
 
Monday, November 29:

ITS @ the Graduate Center:
Once upon a Time in Kamchatka: The Search for Natural Quasicrystals
6:30 PM, Proshansky Auditorium

Paul Steinhardt is the Albert Einstein Professor in Science at Princeton University and director of the Princeton Center for Theoretical Science. One of the leading figures in modern cosmology, he has made fundamental contributions to the "inflationary" scenario for the first moments after the big bang and presented a radical alternative, known as the “cyclic” model of the universe. In addition, he has worked on the nature of order in solids, developing the theory of quasicrystals, which are intermediate between random structures and perfect crystals. Steinhardt and colleagues have also shown that quasicrystalline order can be used to engineer devices for optical communication, that medieval Islamic architects used quasicrystalline tilings to decorate their buildings, and, most recently, that this exotic form of ordering may occur naturally. His lecture will illustrate the power of theory to reach from mathematical abstraction to real life adventure. Free, but seating is limited and reservations are required. Reservations can be made at www.gc.cuny.edu/events. For further information, call 212-817-8215.
 
Contemporary Tunisian Theatre: Jalila Baccar
6:30 PM, Martin E. Segal Theatre

The Segal Center welcomes playwright, actress, and grande dame of Tunisian theatre Jalila Baccar for readings and discussions of her plays. Excerpts from Khamsoun (Corps Otages, 2006) and Araberlin (2002) will be read, directed by Phyllis Roome, followed by a discussion between Baccar and Distinguished Professor Marvin Carlson (Graduate Center, CUNY). Free, for information call 212-817-1860.

Submitted on: NOV 1, 2010

Category: Center for the Humanities, Press Room