Press Release: October Public Programs

The City University of New York Graduate Center announces the following public programs to be held during the month of October at The Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue at 34th Street.


Through Saturday, December 9

The Painted Sculpture of Betty Parsons
(art exhibition) Tuesday-Saturday, 12-6 PM

This exhibition is the first to focus on the vibrant painted constructions, reminiscent of folk and outsider art, that Parsons created from wood washed ashore.  It features 35 of these remarkable works that the legendary art dealer, who was also an accomplished painter and sculptor, made from 1966 until her death.  The Painted Sculpture of Betty Parsons was organized by the Naples Museum of Art (Naples, Florida), which lent the artworks, and curated by Judith Goldman.  The exhibition has been made possible by a generous grant from The Betty Parsons Foundation.  Informal talks on the exhibition will be presented by Art Gallery Curator Dr. Diane Kelder on Wednesdays at 1 pm.  Free, for information call 212-817-7394. 

Monday, October 2

Concert: Locating Empire: Seduction, Domination, and Revolt in the French Cultural Reach
(concert) 6 pm

Part of a day-long conference with the same name, this concert features La Musique de la Reine performing vocal and instrumental works by Chambonnières, Charpentier, Lebègue, Montéclair, and Rameau on period instruments.  Presented by the Ph.D. Program in French.  Free, for information call, 212-817-1520.

Beginning Tuesday, October 3 (series)

Music Recitals

Students in The Graduate Center’s Doctor of Musical Arts Program, many of whom are accomplished professional musicians, regularly give free concerts.  The dates of these recitals are subject to change; for current information, visit http://gc.cuny.edu/events or call 212-817-8607.  The program also periodically offers Midday Music concerts.  Concerts take place in the Elebash Recital Hall, on the first floor. 

Following is the October schedule:   

10/3 -- A Piano Recital with Xheni Rroji, 7:30 pm 10/5 -- Midday Music in Midtown, 1 pm 10/11 -- A Cello Recital with Vicky Wang, 7:30 pm 10/13 -- A Piano Recital with Hui-pin Hsu, 7:30 pm 10/17 -- A Vocal Recital with Baritone Blake Howe, 7:30 pm 10/19 -- Midday Music in Midtown, 1 pm (with the New York Jazz Flautet) 10/23 -- A Vocal Recital with Soprano Soon-Young Kim, 7:30 pm 10/25 -- A Violin Recital with Wei-Ti Lin, 7:30

Tuesday, October 3

Voices of Resistance: Muslim Women on War, Faith and Sexuality
(book talk) 6:30 pm

This talk with Pakistani American poete and activist Sarah Husain, editor of the new anthology Voices of Resistance Muslim Women on War, Faith and Sexuality, also features several authors included the volume.  A diverse collection of personal-political narratives and prose by Muslim women, Voices of Resistance is particularly poigniant in today’s politically and religioiusly charged climate.  The contributors hail from Yemen, Iran, Palestine, Afghanistan, Kashmir, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Malaysia, Thailand, China, Canada, and the U.S.  Presented by the Middle East and Middle Eastern American Center.  Free, for information call 212-817-7570.

Thursday, October 5

War Reporting: Two Generations of Journalism Under Siege
(panel discussion) 6:30 pm

Prize-winning war correspondents compare their experiences and discuss ongoing issues such as the government’s role in reporting war, the cultural legitimacy of the first-person account, and the nature of “embedded” reporting. Participants include: Rajiv Chandrasekaran, former Baghdad bureau chief for the Washington Post and author of Imperial Life in the Emerald City; Frances FitzGerald, author of Pulitzer Prize-winning Fire in the Lake: The Vietnamese and the Americans in Vietnam; Christian Parenti, author of The Freedom: Shadows and Hallucinations in Occupied Iraq; Sydney Schanberg, author of The Life and Death of Dith Pran. Lonnie Isabel, former deputy managing editor at Newsday and professor at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism will moderate. Presented by the Center for the Humanities; co-sponsored by the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism and the Library of America.  Free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Friday, October 6

Brazilian Piano Trios
The Damocles Trio
(concert) 7 pm

A concert by the Damocles Trio, introducing and celebrating the piano trios by Heitor Villa-Lobos and Oscar Lorenzo Fernândez's Trio Brasileiro.  A post-concert discussion will be moderated by Graduate Center Professor Antoni Pizà.  Co-sponsored by the Foundation for Iberian Music and the Center for Latin-American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies.  Free, for information call (212) 817-1819.

Wednesday, October 11

Jacobs vs. Moses: How Stands the Debate Today?
(panel discussion) 6:30 pm

Jane Jacobs’ death in 2006 triggered many conversations.  In particular, it raised the question of whose vision—hers, or that of her arch opponent, Robert Moses— dominates Gotham’s approaches to city building today. A panel discussion historians, architects, planners, politicians, community activists and developers, exploring this issue, will include:  Richard Kahan (Urban Assembly, New York State Urban Development Corporation, Battery Park City Authority), Hilary Ballon (Columbia University), Sandy Zipp (Yale University), Nicolai Ouroussoff, (Architectural Critic, The New York Times), Brad Lander (Director of PICCED, Pratt Institute), Michael Sorkin (City College of New York, Michael Sorkin Studio) and others.  Presented by the Gotham Center for NYC History.  Free, to register call 212-817-8215.

Intimacy and Aesthetics: Video Artists in Conversation
(dicussion) 6:30 pm

This unique series of conversations (also on November 8) offers an inside look at the creative processes of four New York City artists and invites dialogue from scholars, artists, and the public. This evening features Cheryl Donegan and Terence Gower. Donegan’s preferred media are video, performance, and installation, and her recurrent points of reference are film, MTV video, modern decor, and the mass media. Gower is a Canadian conceptual artist who has created numerous projects and exhibitions addressing the problem of display in galleries and museums in a variety of media. Presented by the Center for the Humanitites. Free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Thursday, October 12

A Celebration of Contemporary Black Poetry: Cave Canem's 10th Anniversary Reading
(reading & conference) 6 pm; also Thursday, October 13, 1-9 pm

Celebrating its 10th anniversary with this two-day event, Cave Canem has worked to build a supportive national community of emerging and established African American poets. On October 12, Sonia Sanchez will host a reading by the Cave Canem Poetry Prize winners, including Major Jackson, Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon, Constance Quarterman Bridges, and others. The following day will feature a selection of panel discussions, a reception, and a series of readings by Cave Canem faculty, beginning with a keynote address by Walter Mosley and followed by poetry readings from Elizabeth Alexander, Lucille Clifton, Nikky Finney, Yusef Komunyakaa, Sonia Sanchez, and more. Presented by the Center for the Humanities.  For a complete schedule, as well as ticket information, visit www.cavecanempoets.org or call 212-817-2005.

Why Arendt Matters
(panel discussion) 6 pm

Elizabeth Young-Bruehl, author of Hannah Arendt: For Love of the World, and the forthcoming “Why Arendt Matters” speaks with John Torpey, Graduate Center Professor of Sociology and author of, most recently, Making Whole What Has Been Smashed: On Reparations Politics, and Jonathan Schell, The Nation's peace and disarmament correspondent, author of The Unconquerable World: Power, Nonviolence, and the Will of the People.  Presented by the Center for the Humanities.  Free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Black Women Pioneers, Black Migrations West and the Black Frontier Towns
(lecture) 6:30 pm

In celebration of a new edition of The Black West on the 35th Anniversary of its original publication, the Institute for Research on the African Diaspora in the Americas and the Caribbean (IRADAC) will host three lectures featuring its author, independent shcolar William Loren Katz, on the history of African American men and women on our early frontier. Free, for information call 212-650-2076.

Three Day International Site-Specific Performance Symposium
(symposium) 6 pm

Also Friday, October 13, 10 am-8 pm & Saturday, October 14, 10 am-5 pm

 

Site-specific performance has become prevalent and increasingly inventive over the past several years. In the U.S. and Europe, artists and companies are creating pieces in non-conventional theatre spaces—in the streets, architectural landmarks, public transportation, abandoned warehouses and pools, underground tunnels, and empty garages. This three-day symposium of the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center, curated by Bertie Ferdman and Frank Hentschker with special advisor Elise Bernhardt, brings together prominent international and New York artists, scholars, journalists, and presenters, featuring dialogues, panels, screenings and presentations.  For a complete schedule and more information, visit http://web.gc.cuny.edu/mestc/.  Free, call 212-817-8215 to register.

Friday, October 13

Analogies of Empire: The United States as Superpower
(lecture) 4:30 pm

A talk by Charles S. Maier, who is Leverett Saltonstall Professor of History at Harvard University.  His books include, Among Empires: American Ascendancy and its Predecessors, Dissolution: The Crisis of Communism and the End of East Germany, and The Unmasterable Past: History, Holocaust, and German National Identity.  This event, presented by the Center for the Humanities, is co-sponsored by the Ph.D. Programs in History and Political Science. Free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Monday, October 16

International/World Theatre
An Evening with Swiss playwright Lucas Bärfus
(play reading & discussion) 6:30 pm

This event features a reading of excerpts of Swiss playwright Lucas Bärfus’s The Sexual Neuroses of our Parents.  Bärfuss was named playwright of the year in Germany in 2005 (by the journal Theater Heute) and he received the Mülheimer Dramatikerpreis in the same year.  Presented by the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center, the reading is part of the European Dream Festival.  Free, call 212-817-8215 to register.

Benjamin Franklin's Arcs and Sparks
(lecture & demonstration) 7 pm

The spirit of Ben Franklin comes alive as lightning bolts and electrical fire dance on the stage and some of Franklin’s most dramatic experiments are recreated using reproductions of 18th century equipment.  Presented in the Science & the Arts series, this celebration of Franklin’s 300th birthday features Jim Hardesty, physics historian and scientific instrument maker.  Free, to register call 212-817-8215.

Tuesday, October 17

International/World Theatre
An Evening with Irish Playwright Mark O’Rowe
(play reading & discussion) 6:30 pm

Irish playwright Mark O’Rowe will present the American premier reading
of his play, Terminus. O’Rowe’s raw and powerful tale of contemporary urban life, Howie the Rookie, produced in London, garnered numerous awards, including the George Devine Award (1999), the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature (1999) and the Irish Times New Play Award (2000).  His works have been staged at the Abbey Theatre and the Gate Theatre in Ireland, and he wrote the acclaimed screenplay for the film Intermission (2003) with Colin Farrell.  Presented by the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center.  Free, to register call 212-817-8215.

Wednesday, October 18

Revolutionary Mothers: Women in the Struggle for America's Independence
 (book talk) 6 pm

Carol Berkin, professor of history at The Graduate Center and Baruch College, discusses her recent book, Revolutionary Mothers (Knopf, 2005), and the role that women played in America’s War for Independence. Berkin fills a void in the traditional male-dominated histories and re-animates the period with lively tales of real-life heroines: from generals’ wives, to African American and Native American women during the war, to women who acted as spies and saboteurs.  Presented by Library Associates, the Ph.D. Program in History, and the Center for the Study of Women in Society.  Free, to register call 212-817-7130.

From Swastika to Jim Crow
(documentary film) 6:15 pm

A moving one-hour documentary covering the story of many German Jewish professors who, expelled from their homeland by the Nazis, found new lives and careers at all-black colleges and universities in the South.  Presented by the Rosenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies.  Free, for information call 212-817-1949.

Documenting Catharsis: A Film Series on War and Reckoning
Let There Be Light (1946)
(film screening & discussion) 6:30 pm

Another film in this series will be shown on October 26
Let There Be Light -- produced in 1946 for the U.S. government by John Huston, was taken out of circulation for 35 years, right before its first public screening, on account of its shocking, but desperately positive, images of trembling, paralyzed, and depressed young veterans. Meg McLagan, who is currently co-directing a documentary film about a group of American female soldiers who served in Iraq, will speak on her own experiences reckoning with war in film.  Presented by the Center for the Humanities.  Free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Thursday, October 19

Does Diversity Matter: Race, Class and Higher Education
(panel disccussion) 6:30 pm

This panel discussion on diversity and racial inequality will be moderated by Graduate Center President William P. Kelly.  With Walter Benn Michaels, University of Illinois-Chicago and author of the forthcoming “The Trouble with Diversity: How we learned to love identity and ignore inequality”; Graduate Center Distinguished Professor David Harvey, author of, most recently, A Brief History of Neoliberalism; Graduate Center Presidential Professor Leith Mullings, author ofOn Our Own Terms: Race, Class and Gender in the Lives of African American Women, among many other books; Gary Younge, columnist for The Nation and The Guardian (UK) and author of No Place Like Home: A Black Briton’s Journey Through the Deep South.  Presented by the Center for the Humaniteis. Free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Friday, October 20

Concert: Fortune and Fatality: Performing the Tragic in Early Modern France
(concert) 6:30 pm

Part of a daylong conference with the same name, this concert features La Musique de la Reine performing vocal and instrumental works by Clérambault, L. Couperin, Duphly, and Montéclair on period instruments. Presented by the Ph.D. Program in French and the Interdisciplinary Group for 17th-Century French Studies.  Free, for information call, 212-817-1520.
 
Poetry as Enchantment (in a Disenchanted Age)
The Stanley Burnshaw Memorial Lecture
(lecture) 6:30 pm

Dana Gioia, an internationally acclaimed and award-winning poet, has served as poet laureate of the United States and is currently the chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts. His lecture will be preceded by a brief tribute to "Stanley Burnshaw at 100," with comments by Thomas Staley, director of the Ransom Center at the University of Texas, Austin; Robert Zaller, Burnshaw's friend and literary executor; Matthew Bruccoli, biographer; Alan Filreis, professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania; and Morris Dickstein, distinguished professor of English at The Graduate Center and the founding director of The Center for the Humanities, the presenter of this event.  Free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Monday, October 23

An Evening with Hart Crane
 (panel discussion) 6:30 pm

Join four eminent poets and critics as they discuss the life and work of the poet Hart Crane upon the publication of the Library of America’s publication of Hart Crane: Complete Works & Letters. Participants include: Langdon Hammer, professor of English at Yale University; Herbert Leibowitz, editor and publisher of Parnassus: Poetry in Review; Wayne Koestenbaum, poet, critic and professor of English at The Graduate Center; Brian Reed, assistant professor of English, Washington University; and David Yezzi, former director of the 92nd Street Y's Unterberg Poetry Center. Presented by the Center for the Humanities, and co-sponsored by the Library of America and Poetry Society of America.  Free, for information call 212-817-2005.

The Presence Project
(discussion) 6:30 pm

This discussion of site-specific theater with Marianne Weems (artistic director, The Builders Association) and Nick Kaye (University of Exeter, UK) will explore the ongoing international project “Performing Presence: From the Live to the Simulated.”  Presented by the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center.  Free, to register call 212-817-8215.

Tuesday, October 24

Being Beakman
 (science presentation) 7 pm

Paul Zaloom is a political satirist and puppeteer, but he’s best known as the title character on the award-winning television show Beakman's World, an irreverent look at science concepts from thermodynamics to the mechanics of flatulence. Beakman's World will return to TV screens in fall 2006.  At this event in The Graduate Center’s Science & the Arts series, Zaloom will reveal the creative process of making science hip and entertaining.  Free, to register call 212-817-8215.

Wednesday, October 25

Gotham's Newest Newcomers: The Impact of Post 1965 Immigrants on New York City—And Vice Versa
(panel discussion) 6:30 pm

We are in the middle of one of Gotham’s greatest immigration waves, the one touched off forty years ago by the 1965 immigration law. Experts on both the general phenomenon and specific nationality groups will discuss how the latest newcomers have experienced life here, and have in turn helped remake the city. Participants include: Nancy Foner (Hunter College), Madhulika Khandelwal (Queens College), John Mollenkopf (CUNY Graduate Center), Robert Smith (Baruch College), Ramona Hernandez (CCNY), Peter Kwong (Hunter College) and Joseph Salvo (New York City Department of Planning).  This event, presented by the Gotham Center for NYC History, will be moderated by Maria Hinojosa, Anchor, NPR, Latino USA and Senior Correspondent, NOW on PBS.  Free, to register call 212-817-8215.

Persian Girls by Nahid Rachlin
(book talk) 6:30 pm

Iranian-born author Nahid Rachlin will present her newly released memoir, Persian Girls (Penguin).  She is also the author of Foreigner (W. W. Norton), Married to a Stranger (E P. Dutton), The Heart’s Desire, Jumping Over Fire, and the short story collection Veils (all published by City Lights).  Presented by the Middle East and Middle Eastern American Center.  Free, for information call 212-817-7570.

Thursday, October 26

Documenting Catharsis: A Film Series on War and Reckoning
S21: The Khmer Rouge Killing Machine (2003)
(film screening & discussion) 6:30 pm

In S21: The Khmer Rouge Killing Machine (Rithy Pan, 2003), a rarely seen documentary from Cambodia, the filmmaker brings twelve people to the very site where more than 17000 people were tortured and killed in the mid-70s. Two survivors and a dozen former Khmer Rouge fighters -- prison guards, interrogators, a doctor and a photographer -- confront each other, with the perpetrators re-enacting some of the horrors to which they contributed, in what is now a genocide museum.  Presented by the Center for the Humanities.  Free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Monday, October 30

The Enchantment of the Word: Language and the Study of Literature
The Irving Howe Memorial Lecture
(lecture) 6:30 pm

Presented by the Center for the Humanities, the Irving Howe Memorial lecture will be delivered by Robert Alter, professor of Hebrew and comparative literature at the University of California at Berkeley, where he has taught since 1967. Alter is the author of seventeen books including The Art of Biblical Narrative, which won the National Jewish Book Award for Jewish Thought, and The Pleasures of Reading in an Ideological Age.  His most recent publication is translation of the Pentateuch, The Five Books of Moses: A Translation with Commentary.  Free, for information call 212-817-2005.

Submitted on: OCT 1, 2006

Category: Press Room