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Core Course
 
CTCP 71088 Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices
Prof. Vincent Crapanzano Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [35068]

Elective Courses

ANTH 81500/PSYC 80103/U ED 75200The Public and Publics
Profs. Setha Low and Amy Chazkel Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [35046]

ANTH 70800 Anthropology of Ethics: Critical Approaches for Race, Sexuality, Gender, and Class 

Prof. Nessette Falu
 Wednesdays 11:45-1:45 [35562]

ANTH 70700 Anthropology and Media
Prof. Christa Salamandra Mondays 2:00-4:00 [35281]

ANTH 82000 Anthropology and History
Prof. Julie Skurski Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [35298]

ANTH 71300 Gender and Anthropology
Prof. Patricia Tovar Thursdays 11:45-1:45 [35283]

ART 80030 The Production of Space: Theories and Methods in Modern Architecture
Prof. Marta Gutman Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [35188]

ART 86040 The Lives of Objects
Prof. David Joselit Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [35192]

ART 86020 Art in the Global Fifties
Prof. Romy Golan Wednesdays 11:45-1:45 [35191]

CLAS 75200 The Future of the Past
Prof. Jason Pedicone Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 at Fordham Lincoln Center [35060]

CL 89200 History of Literary Theory and Criticism II
Prof. André Aciman Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [35067]

CL 80100 Dialogue: The Uses of Humanism
Prof. Clare Carroll Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [35021]

CL 84000 The Emergence of German Romanticism
Prof. Caroline Rupprecht Mondays 4:15-6:15 [35061]

CL 85000 Lyric, Prose Modernity
Prof. Joshua Wilner Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [35062]

CL 86500 Lorca, Buñuel, Dalí, Theater, Film, Painting
Prof. Paul Julian Smith Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [35064]

CL 89000 Masculinity and the Renaissance Man
Prof. Gerry Milligan Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [35066]


ENGL 83500 Imperialism, Past and Present
Prof. Siraj Ahmed Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [35327]

ENGL 80700 Affect, Feeling, Emotion: The Medieval Turn
Prof. Glenn Berger Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [35328]

ENGL 80910/U ED 75200 Race and Gender Theory in the Undergraduate Classroom
Profs. Cathy Davidson and Michael Gillespie Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [35329]

ENGL 80600 Distant Reading: Cultural Systems and the Big Picture
Prof. Marc Dolan Thursdays 11:45-1:45 [35330]

ENGL 76000 Aestheticism, Decadence, Modernism 1880-1930
Prof. Richard Kaye Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [35334]

ENGL 72400 Romance and Rapture
Prof. Richard McCoy Thursdays 11:45-1:45 [35337]

ENGL 76000 Woolf, Lee, Shaw: Modernist Literary Approaches to Peace
Prof. Jean Mils Wednesdays 11:45-1:45 [35348]

ENGL 70000 Badiou and Milton
Prof. Feisal Mohamed Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [35339]

ENGL 85410 Cultural Currents and Critical Turns in American Literature
Prof. David Reynolds Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [35341]

ENGL 87000 Contemporary Narrative Theory
Prof. David Richter Thursdays 2:00-4:00 [35343]

ENGL 84100 Theory of Metaphor and Romantic Poetics
Prof. Alex Schlutz Mondays 4:15-6:15 [35344]

ENGL 85500 Creole Poetics: Caribbean Fiction and Poetry
Prof. Barbara Webb Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [35345]

ENGL 84200 Wordworth and George Eliot: Romanticism, Realism, and the Commonplace
Prof. Nancy Yousef Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [35347]

FREN 71110 Problems in French Literary History: The Novel
Prof. Bettina Lerner Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [35558]

FREN 83000 (Un) Classical Bodies
Prof. Domna Stanton Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [35559]

SPAN 80000/U ED 71200 Exploring Translanguaging: A Critical Sociolinguistic Perspective on Language, Bilingualism, and Education
Prof Ofelia García Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [35270]

SPAN 86000 Cultures of War in the Nineteenth Century
Prof. Fernando Degiovanni Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [35266]

SPAN 87100 Cinema and Television in Contemporary Mexico
Prof. Paul Julian Smith Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [35267]

SPAN 87100 Theorizing the Border in Latin America
Prof. Vanessa Perez Rosario Thursdays 6:30-8:30 [35269]

HIST 72100 The Protestant Reformation and Its Impact
Prof. Sarah Covington Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [35107]

HIST 76000 The African Diaspora
Prof. Herman Bennett Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 [35118]

MUS 86100 Critical Approaches to Music: Adorno on Music
Prof. Chadwick Jenkins Mondays 2:00-5:00 [35321]

MUS 86200 Music and the Holocaust: Testimony, Memory, Commemoration
Prof. Abby Anderton Mondays 10:00-1:00 [35322]

MUS 83100 Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Music, Gender, and Sexuality
Prof. Jane Sugarman Wednesdays 10:00-1:00 [35318]

PHIL 76000/PSC 82210 Kant on Freedom and Morality
Prof. Ben Vilhauer Mondays 11:45-1:45 [35228]

PHIL 77500/PSC 80303 Contractarianism and its Critics
Prof. Charles Mills Mondays 2:00-4:00 [35229]

PHIL 80000 Systematic Metaphysics in the 20th Century
Prof. Douglas Lackey Mondays 6:30-8:30 [35585]

PHIL 77800 Philosophies of the Fine Arts: Painting Sculpture, and Photography
Profs. Noel Carroll and Ruth Gilmore Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [35231]

PHIL 76200/PSC 80303 Spinoza
Prof. Justin Steinberg Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [35238]

PHIL 76100 The Problem of Perception in Ancient Philosophy
Prof. Iakovos Vasiliou Wednesdays 11:45-1:45 [35237]

PSC 77903 Critical Perspectives on African Political Economy
Prof. Mojubaolu Olufunke Okome  Wednesdays 6:30-8:30- [35249]

PSC 80303 Political Theory of Capitalism Monday 4:15pm – 6:15pm
Prof. Corey Robin Mondays 4:15-6:15 [35246]

PSC 80402 Democratic Theory
Prof. John Wallach Thursdays 2:00-4:00 [35258]

PSYC 80103 Fueling Critical Race Scholarship
Prof. Michelle Billies Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [35500]

PSYC 80103/SOC 85000 Theorizing Violence
Prof. Jayne Mooney Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [35502]

SOC 75600 Race and Multiculturalism in Global Perspective
Prof. Erica Chito Childs Mondays 2:00-4:00 [35351]

SOC 80000 Comparative Historical Sociology
Prof. John Torpey Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [35354]

THEA 80200 Seminar in a Dramatic Genre: Embodying Performance: Corporeality, Affect and Identity Prof. Erika Lin Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [35221]

THEA 85400 Seminar in Comparative Drama: Japanese Theatre and Performance: traditions, modernity, globality
Prof. Peter Eckersall Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [35226]

U ED 75200   Race & Class in Urban Education Research  
Prof. Jennifer Adams Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [35199]   

U ED 75200 Agency & Social Transformation: Inequalities in Education     
Prof. Anna Stetsenko Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [35206] 

U ED 75200 Social Inequality & Health Disparities
Prof. Diana Romero Thursdays 6:30-8:30 [35415] 


CTCP 71088 Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices
Prof. Vincent Crapanzano Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [35068]
The focus of this seminar will be on the relationship between various conceptions of and attitudes toward language and recent theories of interpretation and hermeneutical practices in the human sciences and literary study.  We will consider the effect of the stress on reference over other language functions – the pragmatic, poetic -- on notions of text, genre, and rhetoric. How does this stress configure meta-critical understanding? How does it foster the often promiscuous play of divergent, at times analytically incompatible, approaches to interpretation so characteristic of contemporary theory? Readings will include works by Nietzsche, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, de Saussure, Lévi-Strauss and/or Gennette, Foucault, Michael Silverstein and his school, Bakhtin, Lacan and Deleuze.             
 
 
ANTH 81500/PSYC 80103/U ED 75200The Public and Publics
Profs. Setha Low and Amy Chazkel Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [35046]
This interdisciplinary course examines the concept of the public, and the plural publics, as an analytical construct of particular importance in both scholarship and political life. Students will master the classic and more recent theoretical literature on space and place with respect to the designation of public and private. We will also go beyond the literature on shared resources and social spaces to think broadly about major approaches to the common, the communal, and the ordinary. We will critically examine such themes as: state versus private jurisdiction in regulating everyday life; feminist and black public spheres; the history and politics of public education; the privatization of urban public space; and political, social, and legal conflicts over copyright, intellectual property and public scholarship and art. We will pay special attention to a dimension of the study of public life of perennial political relevance as a question of global social justice: the privatization of formerly shared or commonly owned resources—the “enclosure of the commons”—as both a historical process and a present-day phenomenon. Readings will include a combination of theoretical inquiries and case studies drawn primarily, but not exclusively, from the North American, Latin American, and European contexts. Students from all disciplines and geographic specialties will be welcomed. Enrollment with permission from the instructors.

 
ANTH 70800 Anthropology of Ethics: Critical Approaches for Race, Sexuality, Gender, and Class
Prof. Nessette Falu
 Wednesdays 11:45-1:45 [35562]
For over a decade, anthropology has seen the emergence of a new focus and direction of research in ethics. This course will explore the antecedents on which this research in ethics has been pursued and in what respects the anthropology of ethics differs from the research into "beliefs, norms, and values" from the past. It will also explore how the "ethical life" might be interrogated across anthropological research on race, gender, sexuality, class, nationalism, human rights, animal rights, and social change. Please contact the instructor at nefalu@gmail.com for permission to enroll.


ANTH 70700 Anthropology and Media
Prof. Christa Salamandra Mondays 2:00-4:00 [35281]
This course focuses on the anthropology of media and media in anthropology. It foregrounds anthropology's contribution to the interdisciplinary field of media studies. It also suggests how attention to mediation enriches the ethnographic endeavor. Readings include classic and cutting-edge ethnographies of the production, consumption and circulation of mediated culture. We will devote particular attention to the mass-mediated cultural forms produced and consumed in complex societies, and emphasize the uses of media in social relations. We will explore the politics of production, contexts of consumption, digital activism and online networking, Case studies draw on various national and cultural groups, forms and contexts, including Bollywood producers, Egyptian television drama, advertising and Latino identity, making news media, transnational telenovelas, online gaming, Facebook and intimacy, the politics of hacking, social social media, and protest. Please contact the instructor at christa.salamandra@lehman.cuny.edu for permission to enroll.


ANTH 82000 Anthropology and History
Prof. Julie Skurski Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [35298]
In this seminar we will explore approaches to the interplay of anthropology and history by examining how thinkers have analyzed and challenged the categories, theories, narratives and methods that have become institutionalized within these disciplines. We will explore innovative works that use an anthrohistorical approach, enriched by concepts from literary, visual, and critical theoretical fields, to examine specific cases and themes.  The readings focus on key topics, including: concepts of historical time, representations and the state, postcolonial studies, forms of violence, and the spatialization of race and gender.  We will read works based on research in a wide range of regions, including Latin America and the Caribbean, South Asia, Europe, and the U.S.

 
ANTH 71300 Gender and Anthropology
Prof. Patricia Tovar Thursdays 11:45-1:45 [35283]
This seminar offers a cross-cultural examination of gender and gender relations in anthropological theory and practice. The course examines the intersection of gender and other kinds of social difference, such as age, ethnicity, race, class, power, and culture. It focuses on the role of production and reproduction, the impacts of colonialism, globalization, migration, work, and family, while critically exploring gender variation, sexual divisions of labor, social constructions of gender, and gender hierarchies in different cultures and from prehistory to present. Class discussions will center on such key concepts as status, public and private spheres, hegemony, resistance, and reflexivity, while examining topics such as, gender performance, the body, sexuality, health, nurturance, and themes of social justice and human rights. The course will also examine how scientific knowledge has been shaped in contexts that are genderized, racialized, and economically exploitative, challenging conceptual structures and methodologies that constitute traditional Western epistemologies. Students will explore methods of inquiry that give voice to the multiply located perspectives of marginalized subjects and communities, and approaches and conceptual frameworks that inform theorizing, critical analysis, and research, as well as its current impact on debates of wide relevance in anthropology. Please contact the instructor at ptovar@jjay.cuny.edu for permission to enroll.


ART 80030 The Production of Space: Theories and Methods in Modern
Architecture

Prof. Marta Gutman Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [35188]
This is a theories and methods seminar, dedicated to learning to describe, analyze and interpret modern architecture. The emphasis is placed on understanding space as produced (as built, lived, and imagined), on questioning received understandings of essentialized terms, and on constructing architecture history as global history. Students should expect to examine terms like form, function, space, and structure as historically situated and contingent concepts; to further unpack structure in its multi-faceted forms (ideology, nature, gender, etc.); and to assess post-structuralist theories pertaining to space, identity and power (Butler, Foucault, Habermas, Bhabha, Lefebvre). Expect close reading of case study examples and primary and secondary texts, and discussion of evidence. Architectural theory is discussed but it is not the main focus of this class.
 
Strongly suggested: Students who have not taken an undergraduate survey in modern architecture should make every effort to audit Prof. Gutman’s lectures in Survey of World Architecture, 4 (1918 to the present), City College. The course meets Mon, Wed, 9:00-10:00, Spitzer School of Architecture, AR107.

 
ART 86040 The Lives of Objects
Prof. David Joselit Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [35192]
This Mellon-funded seminar will consider practices of the collection, conservation, and protection of artworks in conjunction with larger theoretical questions regarding the social value of art, particularly with regard to attitudes toward preserving it as perpetually new. Visiting lecturers will include object conservators, artists, curators, art handlers, and security experts whose presentations on how works of art are “kept alive” will initiate questions about authenticity, the proper treatment of sacred works in museum collections, what in a work of art and may not be ethically amended, and what is the system of values that places so much emphasis on maintaining and securing works of art in their “original” state.
**Email djoselit@gc.cuny.edu no later than Nov. 21 to request permission to register for the course.
Will not accept auditors.
 

ART 86020 Art in the Global Fifties
Prof. Romy Golan Wednesdays 11:45-1:45 [35191]
The seminar will focus on art’s first truly transnational era, the 1950s.   The approach will be exploratory, seizing an opportunity provided by the current exhibition, embracing works by more than 200 artists from over fifty countries, Postwar: Art between the Pacific and the Atlantic, 1945–1965, at the Haus der Kunst in Munich.
 
The seminar will in part take its cues from selected sections of the Postwar exhibition:  Aftermath: Zero Hour and the Atomic Era; Form Matters (materialist abstraction); New Images of Man; Realism (s) as International Style; Cosmopolitan Modernisms (combinations of international and local imagery namely calligraphic abstraction); Nations Seeking Form (the cultural politics of post-colonial nationalisms in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia). To which we will add:  the geopolitics of the Venice and Sao Paolo Biennals as well as Documenta; architecture and the synthesis of the arts; the Brussels 1958 World Fair; museology and reconstruction vs. museology as nation building; the problem of a Cold War art narrative fixated on abstraction vs. figuration; the museum without walls (UNESCO’s Archives of Color Reproductions; the Family of Man); last-ditch attempts at master narratives (such as André Malraux and Hans Sedlmayr)
 
This seminar will also connect with the GC symposium “Art, Institutions, and Internationalism: 1933-1966” (planned for March).
 
Preliminary readings:
Introductory essays to Postwar by Okwui Enwezor, Katy Siegel, and Mark Mazover and Chang-Tai Hung, Oil Paintings and Politics: Weaving a Heroic Tale of the Chinese Communist Revolution,” Comparative Studies in Society and History 49, No. 4 (Oct., 2007): 783-814 (to be posted soon).
 

CLAS 75200 The Future of the Past
Prof. Jason Pedicone Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 at Fordham Lincoln Center [35060]
What is Classics? Where does it come from? Where is it going? These are questions of existential importance for those who have taken a professional interest in the field of Classical Studies, but they are rarely studied formally in graduate school. This seminar will offer graduate students the opportunity to engage with and explore these questions about our field, and to examine themes of particular relevance to the future of the discipline.  It will start with an overview of the history of Classical Scholarship from Alexandria to the present day, and then explore various themes related to the future development of the field such as: the role of a classical education in American education; the development of the field of philology; comparison of current models for classical educational around the world; studies in the demographics of interest in classics worldwide; models for outreach in classics; exploration of possible alternative career outcomes for Classics Ph.D's; and the role classical studies will play in the future of higher education. The seminar will welcome guest speakers including several Paideia Legionnaires."

Readings will be drawn from the following:
History of Classical Scholarship, Volumes I and II by Rudolf Pfeiffer
Selections from History of Classical Scholarship by John Sandys
Philology by David Turner
Organizing Enlightenment by Chad Wellman
"From Polyhistor to Philolog" by Anthony Grafton
The Tyranny of Greece over Germany by E.M. Butler
Wolf's Prolegomena ad Homerum, A. Grafton, G. Most, & J. Zetzel edition
Nietzsche's Birth of Tragedy and Wilamotitz' Future Philology
The Founders and the Classics and the Golden Age of Classics in America, by Carl J. Richards
Who Killed Homer by Victor Davis Hanson
Excellent Sheep by Bill Deriesewicz
The Graduate School Mess by Leonard Casutto
College, What is Is, Was, and Should Be by Andrew Del Banco
The Future of the Classical by Salvatore Settis (2006)
 

CL 89200 History of Literary Theory and Criticism II
Prof. André Aciman Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [35067]
A study of the development of thought about literature from the 18th century to the present day with readings from Kant, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Pater, Widle, Woolf, Tolstoy, Shklovsky, Eliot, Lukacs, Bathes, Poulet, Iser and Derrida. This course will not only address issues pertaining to the evolution of modern aesthetics, but it will also examine current critical methodology.

 
CL 80100 Dialogue: The Uses of Humanism
Prof. Clare Carroll Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [35021]
Beginning with Plato’s Symposium and Renaissance translations and adaptations of it, we will explore dialogue as both genre and mode of discourse, with late 20th and early 21st century theoretical readings from Bakhtin (Problems of Dostoyevsky’s Poetics, Rabelais and His World), Habermas (Theory of Communicative Action), and Agamben (State of Exception).  Following the trajectory of classical dialogue through its diverse iterations in the work of Cicero and Lucian, we will then read some early modern translations of their work. With this necessary classical foundation, we will consider perhaps the most famous dialogue of the Renaissance Castiglione’s Il Cortegiano and its translations.  Examining what Walter Ong called “the decay of dialogue” in the late sixteenth century, we will consider such late Renaissance texts as Guazzo’s La civil conversatione and Spenser’s A View of the Present State of Ireland (a case of scribal publication) in relation to the emerging discipline of the self and the state. All texts will be read in original languages, but translations will be provided. There will be opportunities for work with digital manuscript versions of some texts for those who are so inclined.

 
CL 84000 The Emergence of German Romanticism
Prof. Caroline Rupprecht Mondays 4:15-6:15 [35061]
In this seminar, we will trace the emergence of German Romanticism, beginning with the Enlightenment, and culminating - via classicism - in German Idealism. We will read selected dramatic, poetic and philosophical texts by canonical authors, including Lessing, Schiller, Goethe, F. Schlegel, Hölderlin and Hegel. And we will discuss these in conjunction with recent essays by authors such as Walter Benjamin and Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe. Special emphasis will be on questions of gender. Required readings include:
Goethe, J.W., Tasso, trans. MacDonald
Hegel, G.W.F., Preface to Phenomenology of Spirit, trans. Yovel
Hölderlin, F. Hyperion, trans. Ross Benjamin
Lessing, G.E., Emilia Galotti, trans. E. Dvoretzky
No. 74-83 from Hamburg Dramaturgy
Schiller, F., Don Carlos, trans. Sy-Quia and Oswald
Schlegel, F., Lucinde and the Fragments, trans. Firchow

 
CL 85000 Lyric, Prose Modernity
Prof. Joshua Wilner Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [35062]
In one of Baudelaire’s late prose poems, a poet tells of losing his halo while dodging traffic on a crowded boulevard: “It slipped from my head into the mire of the pavement, and I didn’t have the courage to pick it up - better to lose my insignia than to break my bones.” In this allegorical sketch, Baudelaire propels the desanctified language of the lyric poet into the busy, crowded world of prose.
The cultural condition Baudelaire evokes and its connection with with a changing sense of the relationship between poetry and prose will be the subject of this course. We will begin by examining a group of romantic texts (some pages from Rousseau’s Reveries, some fragments by Schlegel, the debate over “poetic diction” between Wordsworth and Coleridge) which more or less directly challenge neo-classical genre theory and adumbrate formal possibilities which will emerge more distinctly over the course of the century. We will then turn to another group of romantic texts, including writings by Dorothy Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Mary Shelley, to study the gender sub-text which informs this history:  a sub-text in which the figure of poetic election is male and the matrix of prose female. Thomas De Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, which was a self-conscious experiment in “impassioned prose,” and the prose poems of Baudelaire’s Paris Spleen, a number of which are directly influenced by De Quincey, are at the historical center of the course. These writings will provide a bridge between the romantic writers with whom we began and the late nineteenth and early twentieth century writers of experimental prose with whom we will conclude, among them Rimbaud, Stein, Woolf, and Benjamin.
Requirements: 4 credits – a weekly reading journal, informal class presentations, a term paper; 2 credits – a weekly reading journal.

 
>CL 86500 Lorca, Buñuel, Dalí, Theater, Film, Painting
Prof. Paul Julian Smith Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [35064]
This course treats the drama of Federico García Lorca, the silent and Spanish-language films of Buñuel, and some fine art works by Dalí. It involves close reading of literary, cinematic and analysis of the voluminous and contradictory body of criticism on those texts. It also addresses such questions as tradition and modernity; the city and the country; and the biopic in film and television. The question of intermediality, or the relation between different media, will be examined in its historical and theoretical dimensions. The course will graded by final paper (50%), midterm exam (25%), and final presentation, weekly postings to course website and oral contribution to class (25%).

 
CL 89000 Masculinity and the Renaissance Man
Prof. Gerry Milligan Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [35066]
 The course will examine representations of Renaissance masculinity by focusing on the Italian literary canon as well as some examples from European literary and artistic traditions. We will read fifteenth and sixteenth-century authors including Leon Battista Alberti, Baldessar Castiglione, Ludovico Ariosto, and Torquato Tasso and then consider how modes of masculinity, such as the refined courtier or the chivalric knight were adopted and refashioned when they were translated across linguistic, historic, or cultural lines. The course will spend a significant amount of time on prescriptive literature so that we might study both the construct of masculinity as well as how authors manipulated the rhetoric of masculinity and effeminacy to achieve their desired ends. Some important themes we will consider are the role of women in the construction of male identity, the implications of male sexuality, and the association of effeminacy with foreigners, homosexuals, and military defeat. Readings will include historical, sociological, and philosophical texts that help provide both historical context as well as a theoretical framework through which we can (re)-read the canon. We will begin by considering the notion of the "Renaissance Man" as presented by Jacob Burkhardt in his famous study Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy and move quickly to contemporary masculinity theories such as those by Connell, Frosh, and Gillmore. Students are expected to complete brief reading response papers, one oral presentation, and a final research paper of 25 pages. The class will also participate in a site visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. All texts read in the class are available in English translation.
 

ENGL 83500 Imperialism, Past and Present
Prof. Siraj Ahmed Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [35327]
A new field, critical university studies, has recently taken shape within the humanities. This field makes the privatization of higher education—the tacit context of critical theory over the past four decades—itself the object of theory at long last. It attempts, in other words, to direct the tools of theory against its own institutional foundation and, in so doing, ensure theory’s immediate relevance to the lives of its practitioners and students. In the process, it hopes also to suggest proposals for educational reform that would break neoliberalism’s hold on the university.

But the research university does not, of course, begin with neoliberalism. It instead emerged and developed in tandem with European empires from the late eighteenth century forward and was designed to serve their needs. If we want to critique the university today, we might need, therefore, to study the genealogy of empire during this time—from, for example, Caribbean plantation colonies then to the American security state today. This class will give critical university studies broader historical and geopolitical perspectives than it usually adopts, placing the history of the university and of empire side-by-side.

In regard to the latter, we might read chapters from Lenin’s Imperialism: The Highest Stage of Capitalism, Kiernan’s America, the New Imperialism: From White Settlement to World Hegemony, Amin’s Imperialism and Unequal Development, Callinicos’s Imperialism and Global Political Economy, and Harvey’s A Brief History of Neoliberalism. In regard to the latter, possible texts include parts of Gramsci’s ‘The Problem of the School,’ Clark’s Academic Charisma and the Origins of the Research University, Wilder’s Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America's Universities, Bloom and Martin’s ‘Black Studies and Third World Liberation,’ Bourdieu's Reproduction in Education, Society and Culture and Homo Academicus, Spivak’s ‘Marginality in the Teaching Machine,’ Spanos’s The End of Education, Aronowitz’s The Knowledge Factory, Judith Butler’s ‘Academic Norms, Contemporary Challenges’ and ‘Critique, Dissent, Disciplinarity,’ and Newfield’s Unmaking the Public University. Needless to say, we will pay particular attention to how the university is implicated in the novel forms empire takes today as well as the place of literary studies and theory within this conjuncture.

The premise here is that no real reform of the university will be possible until proposals for reform can think beyond the Anglo-American university. This class will thus seek models outside the imperial university that that could potentially influence practices within. Potential texts include pieces from Clastres’ Society against the State, Foucault’s History of Sexuality volumes 2 and 3, Agamben’s The Highest Poverty, Scott’s The Art of Not Being Governed, Robbins’s Intellectuals, Harney & Moten’s The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study, Harvey’s Spaces of Hope, Graeber’s Revolutions in Reverse, and Posnock’s Renunciation: Acts of Abandonment by Writers, Philosophers, and Artists.

The writing assignment for this class should help students fulfill the 12-15 page review essay component of the new Portfolio examination.

 
ENGL 80700 Affect, Feeling, Emotion: The Medieval Turn
Prof. Glenn Berger Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [35328]
This course will consider various theoretical frameworks—both contemporary and medieval—useful in discussing the production and management of affect and emotion. It could be said that the Middle Ages invented affective devotion, and the course will begin by focusing on medieval emotional relationships with texts, devotional objects and religious drama concerned with Christ’s passion: for example, “The Wooing of Our Lord,” Richard Rolle’s Meditation, Nicholas Love’s Mirror of the Blessed Life of Jesus Christ, and lyric laments of The Virgin. We will track the ways that affect in courtly love poetry provided medieval readers with intimate scripts to put inner and outer states of feeling into contact with one another, particularly as the individual perceives herself in relation to (private) desires and (public) pressures. We will examine such texts as Guillaume de Lorris’s Romance of the Rose, Machaut’s Dit de la Fonteinne Amoureuse, Chaucer’s Book of the Duchess, and John Lydgate’s Complaynt of the Loveres Lyfe. We will also examine the crucial role that affect management played in late medieval conduct literature, and we will consider how the production of self-restraint in such texts, particularly within the structures of the married household, helps form emotional communities that allowed emergent social groups new modes of self-identification. We will examine conduct texts such as The Good Wife’s Guide (Le Menagier de Paris) and The Book of the Knight of La Tour Landry, as well as literary texts such as Chaucer’s Legend of Good Women and The Wife of Bath’s Prologue and Tale, as well as Thomas Hoccleve’s Series, and Boccaccio’s, Petrarch’s, and Chaucer’s versions of the Griselda story.

First-year students will be able to submit an annotated bibliography of 15 primary or secondary sources to fulfill part of the course’s writing requirements.

 
ENGL 80910/U ED 75200 Race and Gender Theory in the Undergraduate Classroom
Profs. Cathy Davidson and Michael Gillespie Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [35329]
This course is designed as an introduction to core concepts of race, gender, and intersectional theory and as a course in the pedagogy of teaching race, gender, and intersectionality in the introductory undergraduate humanities classroom. We will be reading a number of key texts, largely in the disciplinary areas of film, media, literary studies, American studies, and cultural theory, from the perspective of critical race theory, feminist theory, queer theory, visual culture studies, gender and sexuality theory, and intersectional theory. We will also be reading constructivist, student-centered, activist, engaged pedagogy and learning theory. The course begins from the premise that profound work in race and gender theory occurs in introductory courses throughout the humanities. Introductory courses are among the most challenging to teach and our CUNY graduate students, early in their graduate careers, have sole responsibility for teaching them on the CUNY campuses. This course is specifically designed to supplement the teaching by our graduate students in their current and future role in higher education at CUNY and beyond.

In demographic terms, the drop-out rate is highest in introductory undergraduate courses. In disciplinary terms, introductory courses are where students are most likely to determine a major and to think ahead to whether they wish to pursue graduate school. In intellectual terms, introductory courses create the critical lens through which students view the rest of their learning, in all disciplines, in school and out. Yet, very little pedagogical training in graduate school focuses on methods for engaging students who are encountering race and gender theory for the first time, on how to integrate race and gender theory into a general introductory humanities curriculum, on how to connect the core concepts in an introductory course with a graduate student’s own specialized research, and on how race and gender are interconnected and converge in the terms of intersectionality.

This course will be offered to Graduate Center students by permission of the instructors. First priority will be to GC students currently teaching courses on a CUNY campus, although others not teaching will be admitted if space permits. We will build upon graduate students’ own experiences as teachers and learners. We will have a site on C-Box/Academic Commons for our course and also sites that will link all the undergraduate courses being taught by the graduate students in the course.

If you are a first year English doctoral student, you will be able to customize your work in this course to include in your doctoral Portfolio.

We will also be partnering with Professor Shelly Eversley’s undergraduate course on “Race and Gender Theory” at Baruch College and finding ways that the students in her course can interact with the undergraduate students in the courses that the graduate students are teaching, perhaps building upon a common project such as Professor Eversley’s ongoing digital archive project.

We will focus on such basics as designing syllabi, creating engaged pedagogical exercises, rethinking formative assessment methods, interrogating both the lecture and the standard discussion models used in traditional humanities courses, and in introducing complex and often difficult theory to students in introductory classes.

Both graduate students and the undergraduates they are teaching will be required to publish some of their work in public online forums and to participate in at least one project that offers a public contribution to knowledge. Permission is required to register for this course. Contact cdavidson@gc.cuny.edu.

 
ENGL 80600 Distant Reading: Cultural Systems and the Big Picture
Prof. Marc Dolan Thursdays 11:45-1:45 [35330]
This course is a tasting menu of the last few decades of what is now called “distant reading”—criticism that places literary or cultural texts within trees, maps, graphs, or other systemic visualizations.

We will start the semester with a few works by Franco Moretti, the movement’s nominator and frequent poster boy. In appropriately genealogical fashion, we will then move outward to Moretti’s methodological antecedents and descendants (especially the work of the Stanford Media Lab).

Equal attention will be paid to the theory and practice of such criticism. One of the most essential questions before us will be the one that all good theory courses need to confront: what is this particular theory good for, and what it is not good for? In curating the early weeks of the syllabus, I will endeavor to include criticism that considers a fair range of periods, genres, and national literatures. Of course, the real fun will be in fields that have seen less distant reading, because that leaves a more wide open playground for newer scholars.

I should emphasize that this is a course in literary theory, not coding. Students will not be expected to complete a full “distant reading” study in fifteen weeks, but rather to design such a study that might be attempted in the future. The latter part of the semester will be taken up with generating such a detailed project design, thinking about the virtues of different models of distant reading, their relative practicality, utility, and limits. We will be finding questions we want to answer and deciding the best specific ways to go about answering them.

As I said, it’s a tasting menu. When the semester is done, you should know if you want to come back to Moretti’s and order a full dinner.
 
 
ENGL 76000 Aestheticism, Decadence, Modernism 1880-1930
Prof. Richard Kaye Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [35334]
This class explores the relation between the aestheticist and decadent movements as well as their determination of modernist aesthetics. We will begin with late-nineteenth-century British, American, and French works by Hardy, Wilde, James, and Huysmans. The fin de siècle was a time of pervasive fears and fantasies dominated by such figures as the New Woman, the urban detective, the homosexual bachelor, the Anarchist, the Oriental, the overreaching colonialist, the self-preening aesthete, the vampire, and the femme fatale, the latter reaching an apotheosis in Wilde’s Salome. In the diverse writings of Pater, Olive Schreiner, Vernon Lee, and Wilde, aestheticism emerged as a theoretically coherent and varied movement absorbed in exquisite surfaces, tantalizing ambiguities, and useless artifice. For decadent writers and artists, scientific theories of “degeneration” could be recalibrated as erotically charged, non-teleological experiments, while Freud drew on “decadent” scenarios for his proto-modernist narratives dealing with hysteria and sexual disorder, preeminently in Dora: Fragment of a Case of Hysteria, Women writers, meanwhile, struggled to find a place within the male-defined coteries of aestheticism and decadence, a theme dramatized in Henry James’ tale “The Author of Beltraffio,,” narrated by a decadent acolyte, in which the aestheticist project must be sequestered from female readers, who can only misconstrue its aims as immoral. Yet there were also alliances between male decadents and feminist writers (Wilde promoted Schreiner’s novel The Story of an African Farm because of its bold challenge to realist conventions and depiction of colonialist malaise.) In France, the woman writer Rachilde publishes Monsieur Venus (1884), a symbolist/decadent novella concerning a dominatrix noblewoman, Raoule, who gradually transforms her working-class lover Jacques into her mistress by emptying him of all his “masculine” traits.

In the class’s second part we will explore how the fin outlasted the siècle, maintaining an intense afterlife in the Anglo-American modernist writing of Yeats, James, Eliot, Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, and Djuna Barnes. The morbidity, subjectivism, sexual experimentalism, and excesses of literary technique characteristic of 1890s sensibility foment modernist revisions that seek to repress their origins in decadent poetics. Wilde's Picture of Dorian Gray, with its hero who cannot "develop," inspires modernist counter-bildungsromanae. We consider Joyce’s Stephen Hero, an early version of Portrait of the Artist as Young Man, arguably a satire of aestheticism as well as a novel with an explicitly Paterian protagonist. The keenly observing, detached bachelor familiar from James also narrates Rilke’s lyrical The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge (arguably the first modernist novel) and that helps to form the paralyzed solitary consciousness of Eliot’s “Prufrock.” Arguably the narrator of Conrad’s Heart of Darkness adopts decadent techniques for his coiled narrative of colonial tragedy. We will consider, too, Eliot’s absorption in the figure of the Jew as an emblem of a malevolent decadent cosmopolitanism versus Djuna Barnes’ depiction of the decadent Jew in her novel Nightwood as a more positively transformative cultural agent. Our class concludes with James’ The Golden Bowl, a novel of twinned adulteries that is one of James’ most topical, aesthetically difficult, and decadent works of fiction. Among the works we will read: Hardy, Jude the Obscure, Huysmans, Against Nature; Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Salome; Schreiner, Story of an African Farm; Freud, Dora: Analysis of a Fragment of a Case of Hysteria; Conrad, Heart of Darkness, Joyce, Stephen Hero, Yeats, Selected Poems; Lawrence, Selected Short Fiction; Eliot, Selected Poetry; James, The Golden Bowl; Barnes, Nightwood; Showalter, Elaine, ed., Daughters of Decadence. We will read relevant critical and theoretical texts, including Walter Pater, “Conclusion” to The Renaissance; Arthur Symons, “The Decadent Movement in Literature”; Mario Praz, from The Romantic Agony; George Bataille, from Literature and Evil; Richard Ellmann, “The Uses of Decadence”; Richard Gilman, from Decadence: The Strange Life of an Epithet; Linda Dowling, “The Decadent and The New Woman”; Michael Riffaterre, “Decadent Paradoxes,” Leo Bersani, from The Culture of Redemption; Regenia Gagnier, “Individualism, Decadence, and Globalization,” Vincent Sherrry, from Decadence and the Reinvention of Modernism”; Matthew Potolsky, from The Decadent Republic of Letters. A mid-term paper as well as a final paper that may be drawn from the mid-term essay. This class can be adapted to parts of the New Portfolio Examination.

 
ENGL 72400 Romance and Rapture
Prof. Richard McCoy Thursdays 11:45-1:45 [35337]
From the middle ages through the Renaissance, audiences thrilled to the heroic exploits, ardent loves, and astonishing incidents in narrative, poetic, and dramatic romances. Nevertheless, a backlash began in the Enlightenment, with some, like William Congreve, contending that the “giddy delight” of romance is ultimately supplanted by the recognition that “‘tis all a lye.” Yet its attractions remain irresistible, and many argue, as Northrop Frye does, that its extravagant fabrications constitute the “structural core of all fiction.” This course will analyze the motifs and patterns of romance – quests and episodic detours, intimations of magic and miracle, disguise, duplicity, and discovery, multiple, androgynous identities, and recovery from recurrent loss – as well as the mixed reception of the genre’s blend of absurdity and wonder. We will explore the roots of romance in late antiquity through chivalric adventures of the middle ages to the hybrid creations of the Renaissance, blending allegory, pastoral, epic, and tragicomedy. Readings will include selections from the Homer’s Odyssey and Heliodorus’ Aethiopica, Chrétien de Troyes and Chaucer, Ariosto and Cervantes, Sidney and Spenser as well as plays by Shakespeare, Beaumont, and Fletcher. We will also consider ways in which romance continues to pervade the novel with selections from Austen and Nabokov as well as popular contemporary romance fiction and film. And we will review theoretical discussions of romance from the sixteenth century treatises through Mikhail Bakhtin, Patricia Parker, Margaret Doody, Barbara Fuchs, Janice Radway, and others. Course assignments are designed to fulfill several of the new Portfolio Examination requirements: an annotated bibliography will be required of each student, and every student has the option of submitting either a 15-page research essay, a syllabus with a 1500-word account of a pedagogical approach to assigned texts, or a 10-page conference paper. Each student will be required to make a brief oral presentation on one of the assigned readings.


ENGL 76000 Woolf, Lee, Shaw: Modernist Literary Approaches to Peace
Prof. Jean Mils Wednesdays 11:45-1:45 [35348]
This course adopts weak and planetary modernist theoretical approaches (recently deployed by Gayatri Spivak, Susan Standford Friedman, and Paul K. Saint-Amour) reading across space and time from a position that is associative rather than definitional, sometimes probable, partial, and provisional to investigate the complex pacifisms of Virginia Woolf, Vernon Lee (Violet Paget), and George Bernard Shaw, as well as, the many pacifist-others, war-resisters, and political activists in their orbit. Reading from what Gillian Beer called Vernon Lee’s “stylized ballet-satire on slaughter,” Satan the Waster: A Philosophic War Trilogy (1920), Shaw’s Back to Methuselah: A Metabiological Pentateuch (1918-1920), a series of five plays, dismissed by Michael Holroyd as “a masterpiece of wishful thinking,” and Virginia Woolf’s “pacifist manifesto” (Jane Marcus) Three Guineas (1938), our seminar will not only consider “the fiction of war’s punctuality” (Amour), but also add to a discourse on peace, peace-making, and peace building, that has recently sought to historically construct both aesthetic and active resistance to war and act as a counter to the mythologizing of war experience. In addition to Woolf, Lee, and Shaw, we’ll read from Jane Ellen Harrison; Hope Mirrlees; T.S. Eliot; Bertrand Russell; Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson; Clive Bell; Nancy Cunard; Mulk Raj Anand; Claude McKay; and Edna Saint Vincent Millay’s commedia dell’ arte Aria Da Capo (1920), as well as from newly published work in the genre of peace criticism. There will be an emphasis on archival research, both digitally and on site. Requirements: Weekly responses; an oral presentation; final term paper 20-25 pages.
 
 
ENGL 70000 Badiou and Milton
Prof. Feisal Mohamed Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [35339]
The title of this course creates an unlikely duet. What does the contemporary Maoist and philosopher have to do with the seventeenth-century poet and statesman? In considering them together, we will see how each has an abiding concern with the formation of an enlightened revolutionary subject. For both Badiou and Milton, that concern is necessarily a literary one. Each formulates at key moments the relationship between literary performance and truth, both from the perspective of writer and of audience. Each strongly resists a response to literature that is only aesthetic, arguing for a literary imaginary fundamental to the human experience of liberating universalism. In engaging in this inquiry, we will look not only at Badiou’s philosophical writings, but also his literary criticism and his recently translated tragedy, The Incident at Antioch. Along with Milton’s three major poems—Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes—we will read key works of his radical prose. As a bridge between these two writers, we will spend some time on philosophical treatments of the “event” and on the recent “religious turn,” exploring the work of Giorgio Agamben, Creston Davis, Gilles Deleuze, John Milbank, and Catherine Pickstock.

Assignments on Milton may be used for the pre-1800 component of the Portfolio Examination.

Major texts:
Alain Badiou, Ahmed the Philosopher: Thirty-Four Short Plays for Children and Everyone Else; The Age of the Poets; Ethics; Saint Paul: The Foundation of Universalism; The Incident at Antioch; Rhapsody for the Theatre.

John Milton, Areopagitica, The Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce, Lycidas, The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes.

 
ENGL 85410 Cultural Currents and Critical Turns in American Literature
Prof. David Reynolds Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [35341]
The critical “turns” in recent American literary studies—among them the hemispheric turn, the transatlantic turn, the religious turn, the animal studies turn, the posthuman turn, and revised approaches to race and gender—have challenged bygone notions of American exceptionalism and have freshly illuminated the multivalence of the American experience. This course considers groupings of American texts, from the seventeenth century to the early twentieth century, organized around five themes: religion and philosophy, race and slavery, gender issues, the city, and revolution. What happens when we juxtapose seventeenth-century Puritan religious writings with later works on religion or philosophy by the likes of Emerson, Hawthorne, and William James? In what ways did antebellum slave narratives and Stowe’s antislavery best-seller Uncle Tom’s Cabin generate debates over race that resonated later in Thomas Dixon’s fiction and W. E. B. Dubois’s The Souls of Black Folk? Is there a continuum in gender-specific devices and themes from the iconoclastic seventeenth-century poet Anne Bradstreet and to nineteenth-century writers like Margaret Fuller, Emily Dickinson, and Kate Chopin? How does urbanization influence the treatment of the American city we compare Brockden Brown’s Arthur Mervyn with antebellum city-mysteries fiction and with a later urban novella like Stephen Crane’s Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, and how does the portrayal of human bodies in such fiction (especially as considered in disability studies) align with shifting commentary on the body politic? How does the trope of revolution, especially as related to the Haitain slave rebellions, develop from Leonora Sansay’s Secret History to Nat Turner’s Confessions, Melville’s “Benito Cereno,” and Stowe’s Dred? We’ll address these and other questions against the background of recent critical turns and against shifting claims about American essentialism. Among our topics of discussion is the polyvocality of literary texts in dialogic relation to their cultural, social, and political contexts. Requirements include a book review and a term paper.

 
ENGL 87000 Contemporary Narrative Theory
Prof. David Richter Thursdays 2:00-4:00 [35343]
After a brief but respectful glance at early twentieth century narrative theory (Henry James's The Art of Fiction; E.M. Forster's Aspects of the Novel; M.M. Bakhtin's Discourse in the Novel), the course will move to the two most fertile sources of contemporary narratology, Wayne C. Booth's The Rhetoric of Fiction and Gérard Genette's Narrative Discourse: An Essay in Method.

In the main part of the course, we will be reading theoretical and applied texts by scholars from the four principal branches of contemporary narrative theory: (1) rhetorical narratology, including Seymour Chatman, James Phelan, Peter Rabinowitz, and me; (2) cognitive narratology, including David Herman, Alan Palmer, Marie-Laure Ryan, and Lisa Zunshine; (3) "unnatural" narratology, adapting narrative theory to experimental, minimally mimetic or anti-mimetic texts, including Jan Alber, Henrik Skov Nielsen, and Brian Richardson; and (4) identity narratology (my shorthand term for theories that view gender/race/national markings as central rather than peripheral to the reading of narratives), including Susan Lanser, Gerald Prince, and Robyn Warhol.

We will be discussing the controversies that arise from these approaches over topics that will include (1) authors, narrators, characters; (2) plot, progression, time; (3) narrative lifeworlds: space, setting, perspective; (4) reception and the reader; (5) ethical values and aesthetic values.

Special topics late in the term may include fictionality as a mode of discourse (very significant this election season); problems of narrative adaptation across media; unreliable film narrative; narrative theory in relation to “distant reading.” Readings will be primarily on BlackBoard; students will work on individual projects that they will present to the class. Students registering for two credits will do a class presentation; students registering for four credits will in addition write a term paper on a topic to be worked out with me. First year students taking 80600 for four credits can substitute elements of the Portfolio---either the 12-15 page review essay or the 10-page conference paper---for the term paper.

 
ENGL 84100 Theory of Metaphor and Romantic Poetics
Prof. Alex Schlutz Mondays 4:15-6:15 [35344]
The Romantic claims for the efficacy of poetic language, particularly its ability to affect and change processes of representation, perception, thought, feeling and moral disposition, rest to a large extent on the work of metaphor as the figural principle of change and transformation in language on the one hand, and as the means of “translation” between sign systems and their various cognitive, affective, material and immaterial “outsides” on the other. Contemporary twentieth and twenty-first century theory of metaphor can vindicate the claims of Romantic poetics, since views of metaphor as simply a special case of “deviant” language have by now long been superseded by a recognition – in the discourses of philosophy, linguistics, and theory of mind among others – that metaphorical processes are central, not only to language, but to thought, cognition and the representation of emotion as well. And as clear distinctions between the literal and the figural dissolve, so do the demarcations of philosophical and literary language, in a way that is quite germane to the Romantics’ convictions about the philosophical valencies of poetry. Through discussion of selected contemporary approaches to metaphor, central texts of Romantic poetics, as well as Romantic poetry, this course will interrogate the implications of both continuities and discontinuities between Romantic poetics and contemporary theory of metaphor. First year students may use written work for the class to fulfill the new Portfolio requirement.

 
ENGL 85500 Creole Poetics: Caribbean Fiction and Poetry
Prof. Barbara Webb Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [35345]
This course will trace the evolution of the idea of a Creole poetics in Caribbean writing. Although the primary focus of the course will be the fiction and poetry of the Anglophone Caribbean, we will also read texts by writers from other areas of the region as well as the diasporic communities of North America. Contemporary writing of the Caribbean has no fixed national or geographic boundaries. The writers themselves often reside elsewhere but their fiction and poetry continually invoke Caribbean history and culture. The process of creolization, that difficult transformation of indigenous, African, Asian and European cultures in the Americas is the cultural model that informs the poetics of the texts we will be reading. Beginning with the origins of Caribbean modernism in the 1920s and 1930s, we with discuss Claude McKay’s Banana Bottom (1933) as an early exploration of the problematics of colonialism, migration and cultural self-definition that foreshadows many of the literary concerns in the post-1960s period of decolonization. It is during this later period that Caribbean writers increasingly turn toward the region itself in search of distinctive forms of creative expression. We will discuss their ongoing investigation of the history of the region and the relationship between orality and writing in their experiments with vernacular forms—from folktales and myths to popular music and carnival. We will also examine theories of creolization in the context of contemporary forms of globalization, migration and transculturation. Of particular interest will be the ideas of literary and cultural theorists such as C.L.R James, Édouard Glissant, Antonio Benítez-Rojo, and Sylvia Wynter. Primary texts: Claude McKay, Banana Bottom, Aimé Césaire, Notebook of a Return to My Native Land, Kamau Brathwaite, The Arrivants, Derek Walcott, Omeros, Lorna Goodison, Selected Poems, Michelle Cliff, No Telephone to Heaven, Patricia Powell, The Pagoda, Edwidge Danticat, The Farming of Bones, Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. Requirements: Oral presentation and a research paper (12-15 pages). The class will be conducted as a seminar with class discussions of assigned readings and oral presentations each week. Comparative and cross-disciplinary perspectives are welcome. First year students may use written work for the class to fulfill the new Portfolio requirement.

 
ENGL 84200 Wordworth and George Eliot: Romanticism, Realism, and the Commonplace
Prof. Nancy Yousef Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [35347]
In his 1802 “Preface” to the Lyrical Ballads, the most radical aesthetic manifesto of the Romantic era, William Wordsworth famously declared the “language really used by men” to be “far more philosophical” than that typically found in poetry and presented the aim of his work as “making incidents and situations from common life interesting.” This demand for awakened attention to the ordinary and unremarkable is taken up again by George Eliot in the 1850’s as she defines the practice and subject matter of what would come to be called “realism.” Eliot’s defense of her interest in “commonplace things and persons” is aesthetic and ethical at once, linking appreciation of what she calls the “other beauty” of “everyday fellow-men” to forms of recognition and respect. This course will explore the conceptual implications and historical significance of these appeals to the “commonplace” as a crucial, yet neglected site for cultural reflection. In focusing on the two most influential articulations of this idea in the nineteenth century—that of Wordsworth and Eliot—we will also be exploring literary and philosophical preoccupations that traverse the Romantic and Victorian eras, as well as critical strategies that allow us to read across the lines of period and genre that typically separate the poet and novelist. The course will thereby offer an opportunity to investigate methodological approaches to a “long nineteenth century.” Readings of Wordsworth and Eliot will be supplemented by related writings on the topic by their contemporaries (including Coleridge, Scott, Mill, and Lewes), as well as by influential theoretical and philosophical accounts of the “everyday” (especially Wittgenstein, Cavell, de Certeau, and Ranciere). Course requirements: response papers, oral presentation, final seminar paper.


FREN 71110 Problems in French Literary History: The Novel
Prof. Bettina Lerner Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [35558]
n this seminar we will examine the evolution of the French novel from the early modern period to the twentieth century.  We will begin with a brief overview of theoretical challenges posed by the novel as a literary genre that has repeatedly redefined itself. We will then explore how this protean narrative form developed into a privileged site for cultural struggle. Over the course of the semester, we will see how each novel we read frames and negotiates a number of tensions that structure the specific historical iteration of the literary field in which they intervene, including sentimentality and realism, politics and aesthetics, high and low, individual and society, history and memory. Discussion will be in French. Students in the French department must write their final papers in French. Students from other departments may choose to write their final papers in English. Novels will most likely include: Madame de La Fayette's La Princesse de Clèves, lAbbé Prévost, Manon Lescaut, George Sand's Indiana, Gustave Flaubert's L'Éducation sentimentale, Marcel Proust's Du Côté de chez Swann and Georges Perec's W, ou le souvenir d'enfance.

 
FREN 83000 (Un) Classical Bodies
Prof. Domna Stanton Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [35559]
This course will examine diverse and dissimilar constructions of the body in seventeenth-century France. We will begin by examining recent theories of the early-modern body in Bakhtin, Elias, Lacqueur, and Bordo, but most notably (and influentially) in Foucault and his notion of “the classical” and disciplined body.  These readings will inform our discussion of different – and potentially contradictory – discourses imbricated in the production of early-modern gendered bodies over and beyond the Cartesian body:  the medical (anatomical), sexual (sodomitical and tribadic), reproductive, perverse and grotesque body; the social, civilized, courtly (honnete) body; the cross-dressed body; the rhetoric of the face and the portrait; the king’s bodies; and the religious and mystical (ecstatic) body.
 
Authors to be read include:  Bourgeois, Chorier, De Grenailles, Descartes, Duval, Faret, Foigny, Guyon, Héroard, La Fontaine, La Rochefoucauld, Molière, Montpensier, Paré, Pascal, Poulain de la Barre, Saint-Simon and Venette.  If we can arrange it, we will also visit the collections of anatomical drawings at the New York Academy of  Medicine.
 
Class discussions will be conducted in English; readings will be in French (although some, eg Descartes, Poulain, La Fontaine can also be found in translations). Work for the course will include a 25-page paper and an oral presentation of one of the primary readings for those taking it for 4 credits; for those taking  the course for 3 credits, there will be a 10-12 page paper, as well as the oral presentation; for two-credit students, the oral presentation will be written up (5-7 pp.). Everyone in the course will take the final exam.
 
A prior knowledge of seventeenth-century French literature and culture is recommended, but not required.
 
For any questions about the course, please contact Domna Stanton (dstanton112@yahoo.com)
 

SPAN 80000/U ED 71200 Exploring Translanguaging: A Critical Sociolinguistic Perspective on Language, Bilingualism, and Education
Prof Ofelia García Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [35270]
All educators need to understand the ways in which language operates in education.  Traditionally language has been understood as simply “named languages,” bidialectism as two “named dialects,” and bilingualism as two “named languages.”  The concept of translaguaging disrupts these modernist and structural understandings of language.  Taking a critical poststructural sociolinguistic stance, this seminar questions the assumptions about language and language diversity that are prevalent in contemporary schooling.  The seminar will include theoretical perspectives that led to the theory of translanguaging, as well as the ways in which these concepts transform practice in education.

 
SPAN 86000 Cultures of War in the Nineteenth Century
Prof. Fernando Degiovanni Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [35266]
Revolutionary wars, civil wars, regional wars; wars against imperial armies, wars against native populations, wars against political opponents, wars against neighboring countries: the deployment of military force and the militarization of life are recurrent facts in nineteenth-century Latin America--and, therefore, topics persistently discussed by writers and artists.  We will focus on the role that technology, labor, travel, medicalization, gender and desire played in narrating subjects and territories, particularly in the Southern Cone. Special attention will be paid to decisive conflicts with regional implications: the Wars of Independence, the campaigns to eradicate indigenous groups, and the Paraguayan War (Guerra Grande/Guerra de la Triple Alianza).  Reading will include works by writers Esteban Echeverría, Domingo F. Sarmiento, Juana Manuela Gorriti, José Hernández, Lucio V. Mansilla, Eduardo Gutiérrez, and theorists Michel Foucault, Giles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, Paul Virilio and Fredic Jameson. We will also discuss the visual production of artists José Gil de Castro, Johann Moritz Rugendas, Ángel Della Valle, Cándido Lopez, and Juan Manuel Blanes.

 
SPAN 87100 Cinema and Television in Contemporary Mexico
Prof. Paul Julian Smith Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [35267]
This course, which is taught in English, studies Mexican cinema and television of the last three decades. The course will address four topics in film: the replaying of history, cinematic genres and auteurism, gender and sexuality, and nationality and transnationalism; and will further study the different genres of television fiction: telenovela, miniseries, and daily one-off drama.  Methodology will embrace analysis of the audiovisual industry, film form, and theory. Grading is by written exam (25%), student oral participation and presentation (25%) and final paper (50%).

 
SPAN 87100 Theorizing the Border in Latin America
Prof. Vanessa Perez Rosario Thursdays 6:30-8:30 [35269]
Migrants from Latin American and Caribbean countries to the US have participated in making and remaking boundaries, as well as notions of identity, freedom, and citizenship in the Americas. Since World War I, successive crises of what Hannah Arendt called stateless peoples have presented significant humanitarian, political, and theoretical challenges.  The objective of this seminar is to describe, debate and theorize the border and critical related concepts such as precocity, post-nationality, belonging, and diásporas in Latin@ America that students will be able to use as they develop their own work. Some of the questions to be explored include: How does the widespread plight of migrants call for new theories and practices of political belonging? What is the role of culture in imagining social and political belonging? How do refugees experience a future, and a past in ways that are distinct from the subject of diaspora or of migration? How do the experiences of up-rootedness and forced migration among refugees and migrant workers inform our notion of home? What are the material and affective challenges, and perhaps opportunities, of mass displacements? And how is belonging constructed, even in transit? What is the relationship between human rights and the humanities? How does the rise of globalization in Latin America, for example, shed light on the ongoing massive immigration of subjects from the Global South to the North? How can we think of theorize the humanities and more broadly culture as a site for advocacy in the twenty-first century? These are only a few of the questions to be considered. Readings will include selections from Américo Paredes, Sara Estela Ramírez, Lorna Dee Cervantes, Nelly Rosario, Junot Díaz, Tato Laviera, Hannah Arendt, Stuart Hall, Juan Flores, Judith Butler, Etienne Balibar, Walter Benjamin, Walter Mignolo, Gloria Anzaldúa, Silvio Torres-Saillant, José David Saldívar, Alicia Schmidt Camacho, and Coco Fusco, among others. Seminar participants will share their work on specific border experiences or pertinent theoretical and research issues.
 

HIST 72100 The Protestant Reformation and Its Impact
Prof. Sarah Covington Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [35107]
The year 2017 marks the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther unleashing onto the world the monumental religious revolution that came to be known as the Protestant reformation. But the story of the reformation—which was not one reformation but many, not simply “protestant” but multi-confessional and Catholic—was much more complex than the traditional narratives convey, and presents enormous challenges to scholars wishing to understand the shattering of western Christendom in the sixteenth century. Equally challenging is the attempt to understand the long-terms impact of the reformation, beyond the fact that it changed the history of Europe, the United States, and indeed the world. Weber, of course, attributed the spirit of capitalism to Protestantism, while Marx and Engels believed that it portended the proletarian revolution. Cultural critics discuss the transformation of literature and the arts under Protestant influence, while scholars still debate its role in the rise of modernity, however defined, more generally.
 
Such conclusions about influence are enriching, but they are too often based on a superficial and often sometimes error-prone understanding of what the reformation actually was. This seminar will therefore plunge students into the world of theological battles and religious wars, of persecutions and martyrdom, and not least the often ferocious debates between historians themselves, in order to understand the age on its own terms. Interdisciplinary in scope, the class will read the works of Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin, as well as literature; we will also extend ahead to later centuries, to discover what Americans or Europeans had to say about their forebears, or how interpretations of the reformation changed over time. The goal of the seminar is to therefore deepen students’ knowledge of this key period and the theological and political developments that propelled it, thereby illuminating its impact on states and empires, science and culture, economics and society in the centuries to come.
 
 
HIST 76000 The African Diaspora
Prof. Herman Bennett Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 [35118]
By employing the heuristic concept of diaspora and specifically the African diaspora this course focuses on the analytical work generated by studying cultures of movement.  As scholars, we might begin by asking whether diaspora complicates our understanding of disciplinary formations including the normative assumptions that inform the study of society and culture.  How does diaspora, for instance, enhance our perspectives on imperial, colonial, national and post colonial formations and the ways in which they have been historically represented?  In utilizing the prism of diaspora, we confront the politics of representation through which scholars render meaning out of the past and present.  For this reason, diaspora like other categories of analysis engages the vexed terrain of representation whereby scholars frame the subject of their inquiries.
 

MUS 86100 Critical Approaches to Music: Adorno on Music
Prof. Chadwick Jenkins Mondays 2:00-5:00 [35321]
Brief Description: This course will examine the writings and thought of critical theorist Theodor W. Adorno. While the emphasis will be on his many monographs and essays pertaining to music (including his books on Wagner, Berg, and Mahler, as well as his renowned Philosophy of New Music and selections from the collection of essays entitled Adorno on Music), we will read those works within the context of the larger scope of his thought. Thus we will also read substantial portions of the Dialectic of the Enlightenment (co-authored with Max Horkheimer), Negative Dialectics, and Aesthetic Theory. Topics of discussion will include: the nature of "truth content" as a heuristic for understanding and evaluating musical works; the social nature of musical material; the role of form (in both the Kantian sense and with respect to structure); the political use (and abuse) of music; Adorno's understanding of mimesis and mediation; the role of musical analysis in Adorno's thought; the position of music within the administered society; the problems surrounding the image of music as an emblem of emancipation; and the notion of "failure" as a critical tool for investigating music.
 
In conjunction with the writings of Adorno, we will also examine excerpts from the works of Max Horkheimer, Walter Benjamin, Karl Marx, Hegel, and Kant insofar as Adorno draws on and critiques their ideas. Selected essays and books from the secondary literature may also be assigned. Students will be asked to prepare short responses to selected readings that will be shared and discussed with the class as a whole. Furthermore, students will write one short paper that presents an "Adornian" critique of a piece of music of the student's choosing and one long paper on a topic chosen by the student in conference with the instructor. 
 
 
MUS 86200 Music and the Holocaust: Testimony, Memory, Commemoration
Prof. Abby Anderton Mondays 10:00-1:00 [35322]
This course explores a variety of methodological and historiographical approaches to music and the Holocaust.  We will examine notions of musical testimony in ghettos and camps; musical memory in the works of early postwar composers; and musical commemorations of the Holocaust which incorporate new media.  Sonic materials under consideration include: The music of Terezín, survivor interviews recorded by David Boder, Schoenberg’s A Survivor from Warsaw, Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 13 (Babi Yar), Hanns Eisler’s score for Night and Fog, and Steve Reich’s Different Trains.  This course will also feature readings by Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Siegfried Kracauer, Pamela Potter, Amy Lynn Wlodarski, Tina Frühauf, Omer Bartov, and Shirli Gilbert.

 
MUS 83100 Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Music, Gender, and Sexuality
Prof. Jane Sugarman Wednesdays 10:00-1:00 [35318]
Over the past three decades, the relationship between music and issues of gender and sexuality has been a major field of ethnomusicological inquiry.  Among the studies that have appeared, some have sought to expand our knowledge of the musical activities of women, while others have examined how concepts of gender and sexuality shape and are shaped by musical practices and discourses, or how musical constructions of gender or sexuality intersect with issues of race, nation, class, or migration.  In this seminar we will read a series of writings in ethnomusicology and closely related disciplines that relate musical practices to prominent issues in gender and sexuality studies, paired with major theoretical writings that helped to inform them.  We will begin with second-wave Western feminism and the feminist anthropology of the 1970s-80s, and continue with poststructuralist approaches, race and intersectionality, queer and trans theory, masculinity studies, and postcoloniality.  Permission of instructor required.

 
PHIL 76000/PSC 82210 Kant on Freedom and Morality
Prof. Ben Vilhauer Mondays 11:45-1:45 [35228]
This course will cover selections from Kant’s major moral writings, including parts of the Critique of Pure Reason, the Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals, the Critique of Practical Reason, and the Metaphysics of Morals, along with the writings of recent commentators.  The goal will be to explore Kant’s texts as well as their connections to issues in contemporary ethics and free will theory.

 
PHIL 77500/PSC 80303 Contractarianism and its Critics
Prof. Charles Mills Mondays 2:00-4:00 [35229]
This course will look at classic social contract theory—Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Kant—which was dramatically revived as a result of John Rawls’s 1971 A Theory of Justice. We will try to get clear on both the important commonalities in their divergent versions of the “contract” as a way of understanding the creation of society, the polity, and people’s resulting obligations, and the crucial differences among their versions. We will then turn to some of the criticisms of the contract idea, whether the classic “communitarian” critique or critiques oriented by class, gender, and racial concerns. The course should be useful in its own right as an exploration of a central strand in modern Western political theory, but for those interested in the subject, it should also be a valuable foundation for a fall 2017 course I hope to co-teach with Sibyl Schwarzenbach on Rawls and gender and racial justice. 

 
PHIL 80000 Systematic Metaphysics in the 20th Century
Prof. Douglas Lackey Mondays 6:30-8:30 [35585]
Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Hegel: famous philosophers who enriched philosophy with new concepts and new philosophical techniques.  But these philosophers were also creators of philosophical systems, maps of reality in which the various departments of human experience were laid out and knit together. The official story is that the construction of such philosophical systems died in the 20th century, killed off by the new analytical style inaugurated by Russell and Moore. But in fact the 20th century is rich in philosophical systems, in which philosophers link epistemology with ethics, metaphysics with aesthetics, logic with religion.

This course will provide a rich introduction to systematic philosophers in the 20th century. Fourteen philosophers will be studied in 14 weeks, including Bradley, James, McTaggart, Alexander, Russell, Cassirer, (C.I.) Lewis, Whitehead, Collingwood, Goodman, and others. This is your chance to catch up with philosophers you have always wanted to read but couldn't find the time.

 
PHIL 77800 Philosophies of the Fine Arts: Painting Sculpture, and Photography
Profs. Noel Carroll and Ruth Gilmore Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [35231]
This course addresses philosophical problems raised by the fine arts, with special emphasis on painting and sculpture.  Topics include alternative views of representation and interpretation. We will also explore the philosophy of art history, examining such historical concepts as modernism, postmodernism, and post historical art.  The notions of medium specificity, the Avant garde, caricature, pornography, censorship and the general question of the relation of art and ethics will also be on our agenda.  The course had no prerequisites.  Students will be expected to make a class presentation and to submit a term paper.

 
PHIL 76200/PSC 80303 Spinoza
Prof. Justin Steinberg Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [35238]
"Baruch de Spinoza was the most scandalous philosopher of his age. His aggressive naturalism challenged the sensibilities and orthodoxies of a seventeenth-century audience. And his philosophy remains provocative, even if not scandalous, today. In this course we will investigate the full range of Spinoza’s thought: metaphysics, epistemology, theory of mind, account of the affects, ethical theory, and political philosophy. We will explore how core features of Spinoza’s thought—including his monism, dual-aspect theory of mind, account of belief-formation, sentimentalist model of evaluative judgments, and defense of democratic governance—can be brought fruitfully into dialogue with contemporary philosophical work, while seeking to remain alive to the strangeness of Spinoza’s views. We will read the Ethics along with selections from his two political treatises, attending to the extent to which Spinoza is a systematic philosopher whose normative philosophy depends on his account of psychology and whose his account of psychology is firmly anchored in his metaphysics"

 
PHIL 76100 The Problem of Perception in Ancient Philosophy
Prof. Iakovos Vasiliou Wednesdays 11:45-1:45 [35237]
We will focus on issues in the epistemology of perception, examining ancient treatments of perceptual error, illusion, and hallucination.  Moreover we will consider whether and to what extent the theories on offer are accurately describable as disjunctivist.  Beginning with Plato (in particular, Meno, Republic, Timaeus, and Theaetetus), we shall spend considerable time on Aristotle, parts of whose De Anima and Parva Naturalia contain the most extended and detailed extant ancient treatment of perception, and the related capacity, "imagination" (phantasia). We will then turn to Epicurean atomism and finally to the debate between Stoics and Sceptics about the reliability of perception.
 
While we will concentrate on the primary sources, there will be significant engagement with secondary literature, including reading some contemporary work on the problem of perception and disjunctivism.
 

PSC 77903 Critical Perspectives on African Political Economy
Prof. Mojubaolu Olufunke Okome  Wednesdays 6:30-8:30- [35249]
Political and economic development in the 20th and early 21st centuries have propelled significant increase in the power and importance of the nation-state. Toward the end of the 20th Century, the Washington Consensus presented the institutions and structures of globalization as the only viable alternatives for effective allocation of resources and economic development; and promoted the neoliberal market economy as the economic justification for relying on markets to coordinate international activity. African countries were virtually compelled to embrace economic and political liberalization. Paradoxically, globalization is also considered to have led to the diminution of the state and strengthening of non-state forces in global political and economic relations. Following this logic, many African states have been categorized as weak, fragile, failing, or failed. While “Africa Open for Business” and “Africa Rising” express the hopefulness of Afro-optimists’ expectations, ethnic, religious, and sectarian violence, insurgencies and high levels of socioeconomic inequality are taken by Afro-pessimists as indications of grand failure and the crisis of the post-colonial African state.
The creation and consolidation of modern African nations and states were shaped by European imperialism and colonialism and nationalist struggles to dislodge them. These phenomena have shaped the role and position of African nations in the world’s political and economic systems. While many nationalists in their anti-colonial struggle drew upon ideas from European political and intellectual movements, there were also powerful African critiques of these nationalist responses. These ideas are challenging orthodox neoliberal capitalist and earlier radical frameworks about the nature and structure of the state, economic and social relations in the African continent.
Using case studies, this course will attempt to outline and evaluate orthodox political and economic theories of capitalism that undergird the establishment of the modern state and shape socioeconomic relations in Africa, as well as the traditional and contemporary radical critiques of the historical, political, and epistemological context for scholarship on the political economy of Africa.
We will examine the evolution of, and logical connections between some of the key arguments, perspectives, and theoretical and empirical linkages of topics including the following conceptually and theoretically: colonialism and imperialism, nationalism, development (and “modernization”), neoliberalism, and globalization. We will also consider and evaluate Marxist, Dependency, World Systems, Feminist, and other critiques of the African nation-state, and the continent’s post-colonial political economy.
There is considerable variation in the strength of the states and political institutions, levels of economic growth, and the degree of socioeconomic inequality, and ethnic tensions, as well as level of political violence within states in the African continent. We will consider the historical, political and economic forces that shape contemporary developments in the African continent. We will attempt to explain observed variation and disparity through case studies and the application of the analytical tools offered by orthodox theories of political economy and radical critiques that propose alternatives. In addition, through a consideration of Africa’s contemporary political and economic history, its precolonial structures, and external influences from colonialism, imperialism and globalization, on the shape of postcolonial African states, we will consider the relevance and usefulness of accepted terminologies, assumptions and theories for studying African political economy. We will also consider the social forces that influence contemporary African political and economic relations including ethnicity, race, class, religion, and civil society.
Our study of African political economy will be interdisciplinary. While we are focused primarily on studying the interplay between politics and economic relations in the African continent, many of the concepts and explanations that will enhance our understanding are from other disciplines in the Social Sciences and Humanities. There is no consensus on any of the concepts and perspective that we will study, so, we will consider the sources and nature of the debates over concepts, methods and explanations used to study political and economic development. To do this successfully, we also must be aware of our own intellectual and political positions, and those of the scholars whose work we read.
Our objectives are as follows:
Develop an analytical understanding and evaluation of the economic processes and functions underlying imperialism, colonization, globalization and their influences on African political economy. Understand the economic dimensions of the concepts of democracy and social justice and their influences on contemporary African political economy. Comparison and critique of the major schools of thought within contemporary radical political economy as they apply to Africa. Access the information necessary to make a basic judgement on the comparative merits of markets and institutional alternatives and frameworks presented by radical critiques.
The questions that we will focus on include:
What historical and contemporary political, and economic forces explain the weakness of state structures, disparate levels of economic growth, poverty, inequality, and the nature of political violence in Africa? What central assumptions about human nature, history, socioeconomic change, and the nation-state have influenced the theories on African political economy? What are the main intellectual challenges to the dominant theories on African political economy? In what ways do these challenges replicate, critique, or dismantle the prevailing assumptions and dominant theories? To what extent is there a dialectical relationship between the theories we study, theorists’ personal political experience, and concepts of nation-state and political economy? How effective are theories including neoliberalism Marxism, Dependency, World Systems, and Feminism in explaining understanding African political economy, inclusive of issues of political, social, and economic power, domination, resistance, patriarchy, and liberation?


PSC 80303 Political Theory of Capitalism Monday 4:15pm – 6:15pm
Prof. Corey Robin Mondays 4:15-6:15 [35246]
In ancient Greece, the dominant political form was the city-state. In Rome, it was the republic and the empire. After the fall of Rome, it was the Church. In the early modern era, it became the state. Today, it is capitalism. But where Greece, Rome, the Church, and the state all produced their own distinctive political theories, capitalism has not. Indeed, it’s greatest—and, with the exception of Hayek, perhaps only—political theorist devoted his attentions to capitalism solely in order to bring it to an end. For many, capitalism is not a political form at all; it is strictly a mode of economic organization. What is entailed in that distinction—between the political and the economic—and whether and how it can be sustained will be a central preoccupation of this course.
Through an examination of the classics of political economy, as well as some less canonical texts, we will assess whether capitalism has (or can have) a political theory, and if so, what that theory is. We will be especially interested in how political economy as an idiom translates or sublimates the basic vocabulary and perennial concerns of political theory: authority, obligation, and obedience; the nature of value; the tensions between action, institutions, and fortune; dynastic v. acquired power.
Rather than assume that the political question of capitalism is exhausted by the state’s relationship to the economy, we will examine how capitalism produces a distinctive and independent political form of its own, with its own rules and values. Readings will be drawn from some combination of the following thinkers: Aristotle, Locke, Hume, Smith, Hegel, Malthus, Ricardo, Marx, Jevons, Weber, Keynes, Schumpeter, Arendt, Hayek, Becker, Friedman, Foucault, Brown, Harvey.

 
PSC 80402 Democratic Theory
Prof. John Wallach Thursdays 2:00-4:00 [35258]
 

PSYC 80103 Fueling Critical Race Scholarship
Prof. Michelle Billies Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [35500]
This interdisciplinary course creates an incubator for students seeking support and inspiration for their analyses of race. Readings span critical race theory and methods; transnational feminisms; Black geographies and Caribbean philosophies; indigenous studies and critical ethnic studies; critical whiteness studies; art and poetry; and activist scholarship. Students may use assignments to deepen an understanding of a particular theorist or body of work; self-reflexive thinking/feeling through internalized dominance or internalized racism and its relationship to the student’s scholarly work and/or activism; retooling the philosophical or theoretical underpinning of the student’s research; collaborating with each other to generate theory; or other experiments. Students will be invited to contribute a reading to the syllabus toward collectively working through and learning from particular theorists of interest.

 
PSYC 80103/SOC 85000 Theorizing Violence
Prof. Jayne Mooney Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [35502]
This is course focuses on why violence is both an anathema and, at the same time, a common part of everyday life and a core cultural concern for movies through to videogames and the daily news. That is, it is concerned with the prevalence of violence and the fascination of violence. We will discuss the gamut of violence from homicide and domestic violence, through to spree and serial killings to terrorism and the violence of the state, to the harsh realities of war and genocide.  The gendered nature of violence and the structural violence of race and class will be considered throughout, as well as, the theories that have arisen in an attempt to provide an explanation. We will focus on why ‘normal’ persons commit extreme violence and why violence is such a ‘normal’ part of the institutions of late modern society. Finally we will turn to how we can tackle the dehumanization and othering which constitute the narratives and psychological mechanisms that make such violence possible.

 
SOC 75600 Race and Multiculturalism in Global Perspective
Prof. Erica Chito Childs Mondays 2:00-4:00 [35351]
Studying race and multiculturalism in a global perspective is an increasingly important phenomenon.  The global economy, growing rates of immigration, and rapidly advancing information and media technologies have brought diverse groups in closer contact in more areas of the globe, even those previously regarded as racially and ethnically homogenous.  This course will cover a myriad of issues under the rubric of race and multiculturalism, encompassing a large multidisciplinary body of research and beginning with a review of the very concepts of race, ethnicity, and multiculturalism. Throughout the course, we will explore what interracial intimacies, multicultural policies, multiracial families, and cross-racial coalitions show us about contemporary race relations, and the intersections of race, gender, religion, and class. Subjects covered include interracial/mixed marriage, transracial adoption, race/multiculturalism in law and politics, multicultural education, and multiracialism in the media and popular culture. We will focus on these issues in contemporary America, as well as globally covering varied countries and regions. A variety of theoretical frameworks including critical race theory, cultural studies, and post-colonial writings, as well qualitative and quantitative methodologies for studying these issues will be addressed to engage in comparative intercultural and interdisciplinary dialogue.

 
SOC 80000 Comparative Historical Sociology
Prof. John Torpey Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [35354]
One of the most striking tendencies in recent the historical social sciences is the bold return of grand narratives and of global perspectives on human life.  This course introduces students to the field of comparative-historical sociology and to world history.  We will focus on approaches to making sense of major social change in the areas of state formation and democratization, the uses of physical violence, revolution, religion, and the economy, and on how approaches to these issues have changed over time.  As befits a course with these aims, readings will be substantial and will range widely across time and place.  We will emphasize especially major turning points and transformations in human history

 
THEA 80200 Seminar in a Dramatic Genre: Embodying Performance: Corporeality, Affect and Identity Prof. Erika Lin Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [35221]
This course examines theories and practices of embodiment in relation to theatre and performance in a range of times and places. Taking a transhistorical approach to corporeality, we will explore topics such as: sensory perception; cognition and skill; architecture, landscape, and stage space; clothing, props, and prostheses; dance, movement, and gesture; audience affect and interpretation; sexuality and erotic experiences; stage violence; disability; queer, trans*, and intersex bodies; race and ethnicity; age; class and labor politics; sports and spectacle; music and acoustics; and ritualized action, sacred and secular. Each class session will approach a particular aspect of embodiment through disparate performance practices. For instance, we might discuss processional movement and the production of space in relation to Trinidad Carnival, funeral rituals, Ramlila, and modern dance; theatrical spectatorship and technologies of viewing, from the anatomy theatres to the microscope to photography to digital media; gender and sexuality in Galenic humoral theory, Native American kinship structures, Judith Butler, and Taylor Mac; and bodily presence in relation to the Eucharist, theatrical architecture, acoustics, and virtual reality. Examples across various eras and cultural contexts will be juxtaposed against each other to highlight both the historical specificity of bodily practices and discourses and their larger historiographic stakes, particularly in relation to theatrical semiotics, phenomenology, and performativity. Evaluation: active class participation, short weekly response papers, possible brief in-class presentation, research proposal with annotated bibliography, and a final paper. Please contact the instructor at elin1@gc.cuny.edu for permission to enroll.

 
THEA 85400 Seminar in Comparative Drama: Japanese Theatre and Performance: traditions, modernity, globality
Prof. Peter Eckersall Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [35226]
This course will investigate theatre and performance in Japan.  It will introduce students to classical performance forms of noh, kyôgen, kabuki and bunraku and consider their aesthetic formation and social context in history as well as today. We will consider Japan’s encounter with modernity in the early 20th century when aesthetic developments in Japanese theatre occurred in dialogue with European avant-gardism.  Radical theatre and performance during the 1960s will be discussed in relation to the rise of student protest, and we will consider how contemporary theatre and performance in Japan coopts and resists experience of globalization.  The course will study plays, documentation of performances, and the historical and contemporary contexts for notable performance groups.  As such, a selection of plays will be examined in English alongside the work of theatre directors and performance makers including artists working to develop interdisciplinary and intercultural forms of expression. A focus of the course will be the consideration of theatre and performance as connected to contexts of nationhood, modernity, culture, politics and globalization.  Hence, we will consider a diverse range of theatre and performance events that show contestatory connections with political and cultural histories while also paying attention to the everyday lives of people wherein performance is a means of documenting and transforming personal experiences.  Students can expect to study a range of pioneers who have influenced Japanese performance practices including playwrights and directors such as Abe Kôbô, Yukio Mishima, Kishida Rio, Kawamura Takeshi, and Hirata Oriza.  We will also study contemporary performance practitioners such as the butoh pioneer Hijikata Tatsumi and groups such as Chelfitsch, and Dumb Type. Please contact the instructor at peckersall@gc.cuny.edu for permission to enroll.

 
THEA 81600 Seminar in Film Theory: Theory of Cinema
Prof. David Gerstner Wednesdays 2:00-6:00 [35224]
“That the theater is more restrictive than painting is strikingly demonstrated by an experience of [Sergei] Eisenstein. At a time when he still directed theatrical plays he found out by trial and error that stage conditions could not be stretched infinitely—that in effect their inexorable nature prevented him from implementing his artistic intentions, which then called for film as the only fitting means of expression.” And thus writes film theorist Siegfried Kracauer. Why make such a bold assertion (as Kracauer does throughout his career) about the cinema’s aesthetic exceptionalism over that of theater? As it turns out, such comparisons between (especially) theater and cinema inform the foundation of film theory. Concerns over performance, time and space, spectatorship, and movement take place front-and-center for the likes of theoreticians Arnheim, Panofsky, Eisenstein, Epstein, Hartmann, and so on. Although Kracauer is one of the last modernists to make these claims, later film theorists (particularly through French thought) redirected film analysis to questions of language and ideology. At the same time, and as late as Deleuze’s and Rodowick’s contributions, concepts about mise-en-scène, narrative, and the auteur remain in play. Mixed with discussions about race, gender, feminism, nationalism, and sexuality, film theory continues to engage the foundational properties of the cinematic medium to explore a range of theoretical concerns. Required Text Film Theory and Criticism [1974]. Edited by Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen, 7th edition, New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. This book is on reserve if you prefer not to purchase. Course Reader (CR). Available through University Readers (to order, see instructionspndtw-7  in Blackboard). Assignments Weekly analysis of films and readings (1-1.5 pages). Submit via Blackboard as a Word document only! (see Content folder for assignment uploads) Developing abstract to be presented to and discussed with seminar members. One storyboard with close-analysis: This project involves analyzing a short sequence from a film screened in class. A storyboard created either by film grabs or hand-designed illustrations must be accompanied by brief scene descriptions and theoretical analysis of the main sequence. The project follows a series of readings that will support your work. Your storyboard and analysis must be submitted via Blackboard’s Assignment folder (within the Content folder). You may wish to explore PowerPoint or Keynote (Mac) software that helps create formatting for a storyboard. Final paper (7500-8000 words). Due one week after our last meeting.          


U ED 75200   Race & Class in Urban Education Research  
Prof. Jennifer Adams Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [35199]   
This class will examine the ways that race and ethnicity, often intersected with other social structures (such as socioeconomic status, gender, immigration), are taken up in urban education research. With an emphasis on critical, decolonial and poststructural approaches, we will examine the works of both seminal and contemporary scholars and discuss how they used their respective lens to unpack various discourses and issues around race in their research and writing; some of these scholars include graduates from the Graduate Center Urban Education program.  Students’ research interests and projects will be central to shaping the course and it is expected that they will both contribute readings and share connections to their own emerging work during weekly dialogues.

                                                                                                                              
U ED 75200 Agency & Social Transformation: Inequalities in Education     
Prof. Anna Stetsenko Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [35206] 
The role of agency and activism in knowledge production, human development, and pedagogy remains highly contested across major frameworks at the intersection of education and human development. This course will examine a broad spectrum of approaches – from feminist works and new materialism to critical sociocultural theories, critical pedagogy and pedagogy of desire – in terms of how they address agency at both individual and collective levels of social dynamics. One of the angles will be to critically address how conceptions about agency in the context of culture, politics, and society find their way into the practices of teaching and learning. The goal is to set the stage for discussing the ways to overcome the ethos of adaptation and transmission to instead advance the tools for agentive positioning within the dynamics of social transformation in classrooms and beyond. In capitalizing on social transformation and activist agency, this exploration will interrogate various models and epistemologies in terms of how they overcome the taken-for-granted norms, biases, power differentials, and inequalities.     
      
                                                                                                                      
U ED 75200 Social Inequality & Health Disparities
Prof. Diana Romero Thursdays 6:30-8:30 [35415]