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Courses

Core Course

CTCP 71088 Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices
Prof. Bettina Lerner Thursdays 6:30-8:30 [27824]

Elective Courses

ANTH 810000 Anthropology of the Imagination
Prof. Vincent Crapanzano Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [27516]

ANTH 78500/LING 79500/SPAN 80100 Language Ideologies
Prof. Miki Makihara Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [27506]

ANTH 71600 Post-Colonial Truth-Making: Anthropological Perspectives
Prof. Victoria Sanford Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27501]

ANTH 72300/PSYC 80103 Anthropology of Space and Place
Prof. Setha Low Fridays 2:00-4:00 [27504]

ANTH 70700/MUS 83100 Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Music and Revolution: Perspectives from the Middle East and North Africa
Prof. Jonathan Shannon Mondays 6:30-8:30 [27749]

ART 86020 Seminar: Selected Topics in Modern Art: No Man’s Land: Art and World War I
Prof. Remy Golan Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27424]

ART 86020 Seminar: Selected Topics in Modern Art: Postwar Italian Art
Prof. Emilly Braun Tuesdays 9:30-11:30 [27422]

ART 86030 Seminar: Selected Topics in Modern Architecture, Urbanism, and Design: Race, Space, and Architecture
Prof. Marta Gutman Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27426]

ART 89000 Seminar: Selected Topics in Art History: Documentary after Conceptual Art
Prof. Siona Wilson Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [27427]

ART 89400/THEA 81600 Seminar in Film Theory: Theories of the Cinema
Prof. Amy Herzog Mondays 11:45-3:45 [27428]

CL 80100 Novel Theory
Prof. John Brenkman Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [27057]

CL 88300 Ideology, Education, and Nation Building: Reading and Writing in Post-Unification Italy
Prof. Morena Corradi Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [27059]

CL 89200 History of Literary Theory and Criticism II
Prof. Charity Scribner Mondays 4:15-6:15 [27061]

CL 81000/HIST 72400 Adventures in Marxism: From the Communist Manifesto to Alain Badiou
Prof. Richard Wolin Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27386]

ENGL 76200 Body, Affect, Landscape: Postcolonial Reckonings
Prof. Meena Alexander Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [27360]

ENGL 80400 Queerin(ing) Critique
Prof. Kandice Chuh Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27367]

ENGL 85410 Character: The Commodification of Subjectivity
Prof. Marc Dolan Mondays 11:45-1:45 [27369]

ENGL 81100 Memory and Post-Historicist Temporalities in the Early Modern Period
Prof. Martin Elsky Mondays 6:30-8:30 [27371]

ENG 75000 Unsettled States: Rethinking Canonicity and Geography in Early US Literature
Prof. Duncan Faherty Mondays 4:15-6:15 [27375]

ENGL 84300 Cognitive Theory, Victory Physiological Psychology, and the Novel
Prof. Gerhard Joseph Mondays 1:45-3:45 [27387]

ENGL 87300 Ontologies of Vibration: Sound Studies
Prof. Eric Lott Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [27391]

ENGL 80600 Memoir/Illness/Graphic/Grief
Prof. Nancy K. Miller Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [27394]

ENGL 87100 The Rise of the Novel
Prof. David Richter Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27397]

ENGL 84200 Freedom and Necessity: Philosophical and Literary Positions 1750-1820
Prof. Alexander Schlutz Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27399]

FREN 86200 Textes et Théories du Théâtre au Vingtième Siècle
Prof. David Jones Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [27722]

FREN 79140 Crowds in North Africa
Prof. Andrea Khalil Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [27720]

FREN 87000 Feminist Theories
Prof. Domna Stanton Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [27725]

SPAN 85000 Lorca, Buñuel, Dalí: Literature, Cinema. Image
Prof. Paul-Julian Smith Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [27180]

SPAN 87100 Music’s Letter: Latin American Literature and Musical Thought
Prof. Lucia Fiol-Matta Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [27184]

SPAN 87100 Mexican Narcoimaginaries: State, Politics, and Literary Representations of the Drug Trade
Prof. Oswaldo Zavala Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [27182]

HIST 72600 Deviance and Colonialism
Prof. Satadru Sen Mondays 6:30-8:30 [27246]

HIST 72800 Introduction to the History of the Emotions
Prof. Megan Vaughan Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [27251]

LING 79600/SPAN 80000 The Politics of Language: Ethnic, National, and Geographic Perspectives
Prof. José del Valle Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [27178]

MUS 84200 Seminar in Theory/Analysis: Topic Theory: Analytical and Critical Issues
Prof. Kofi Agawu Thursdays 2:00-5:00 [27439]

PHIL 77900/PSC 80302 Social Ontology and Democracy
Prof. Carol Gould Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27170]

PHIL 77000 Psychoanalytic Theories of Agency, Character, and Mind
Prof. Elliot Jurist Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27165]

PHIL 76200 History of Aesthetics: Hegel to Nietzsche
Prof. Douglas Lackey Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [27172]

PHIL 77700 Critical Philosophy of Race
Profs. Linda Alcoff and Frank Kirkland Thursdays 11:45-1:45 [27177]

PSC 71901 Contemporary Political Theory
Prof. Robyn Marasco Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [27720]

PSC 80301 Transcendence and Public Life
Prof. Susan Buck-Morss Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27213]

PSC 80405 Psychoanalysis and Political Thought
Prof. Jack Jacobs Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [27219]

PSYC 79200 Current Issues in Psychology
Prof. Susan Saegert Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27632]

PSYC 80103 The Study of Lives
Prof. Jason Van Ora Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27651]

PSYC 80103/U ED 75200 Structural Violence and Radical Possibilities: Designing Critical Educational Studies
Prof. Michelle Fine Mondays 4:15-6:15 [27199]

PSYC 80260 Gender and Sexuality Theory
Prof. Deborah Tolman Wednesdays 9:30-11:30 [27678]

SOC 84600 Social and Political Subjectivity from Wilhelm Reich to Bernard Stiegler
Prof. Stanley Aronowitz Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [27352]

SOC 85405 Social Change
Prof. Roslyn Bologh Mondays 6:30-8:30 [27350]

THEA 70600 History of Theatrical Theory
Prof. Peter Eckersall Mondays 4:15-6:15 [27091]

THEA 85600 Studies in Theatre Aesthetics: Mediatized Performance
Prof. Edward Miller Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27098]

THEA 86000 Theatre and Society: Rootless Cosmopolitans: Yiddish Theatre and the Aesthetics of Diaspora
Prof. Debra Caplan Thursdays 2:00-4:00 [27099]



CTCP 71088 Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices
Prof. Bettina Lerner Thursdays 6:30-8:30 [27060]

This course will explore both the historical formation of philosophical critique and contemporary developments in critical theory in a global context. We will engage with literary, sociological, psychological, political, and philosophical dimensions of critical theory as it seeks to describe and evaluate modern and post-modern society and cultural production. Through presentations, short written assignments and a final paper, students will be encouraged to question and develop these approaches within and across their own fields. Readings may be drawn from a variety of sources including Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Benjamin, Horkheimer, Adorno, Marcuse, Habermas, Althusser, Lacan, Foucault, Deleuze, Derrida, Bhabha, Spivak, Butler, Nancy, Rancière, Laclau, Latour and Mouffe.


ANTH 81000 Anthropology of the Imagination
Prof. Vincent Crapanzano Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [27516]

This seminar addresses the possibility of developing an anthropology -of the imagination It will be divided into three overlapping parts. The first looks at philosophical (Kant), phenomenological (Sartre), and psychoanalytic (Lacan) approaches to the imagination. The second part is concerned with the social and cultural imaginaries and their determinants (B. Anderson, J. and J. Camaroff). The third part looks at imaginative horizons – to the spatial, temporal, and affective dimensions of imaginative experiences. Here we will focus on constructs and affective tonalities of images of the beyond – those of the past (memories, traumas, and memorializations) and those of the future (dreams, hope, risk, danger, despair, and fantasies of world endings and the afterlife).


ANTH 78500/LING 79500/SPAN 80100 Language Ideologies
Prof. Miki Makihara Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [27506]

Recent studies of language in its sociocultural context highlight the role of language ideologies and cultural conceptions of language in transforming social dynamics and power relations as well as language use and structure. In this seminar, we will explore linguistic anthropological and other theoretical frameworks and case studies from around the world to study the relationship between language ideologies and social processes and their linguistic and social consequences. The topics considered include modern linguistics, colonialism, missionization, nationalism, globalization, identity formation, indigenous movements, dialect and language formation, language endangerment and revitalization.


ANTH 71600 Post-Colonial Truth-Making: Anthropological Perspectives
Prof. Victoria Sanford Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27501]

The course takes a critical look at truth commissions in Africa, Asia and Latin America. We will explore anthropological literature on truth commissions and truth-making processes to understand the ways in which the official creation of historical truth(s) reaffirms a hegemonic colonial enterprise as it elides revolutionary opposition and protest subjectivity, thus failing to address underlying socio-economic issues of protest and insurgency (land, inequality, etc).


ANTH 72300/PSYC 80103 Anthropology of Space and Place
Prof. Setha Low Fridays 2:00-4:00 [27504]

The study of the city has undergone a transformation during the past ten years integrating ever wider theoretical perspectives from anthropology, cultural geography, political economy, urban sociology, and regional and city planning, and expanding its attention to the city as physical, architectural and virtual form.  An emphasis on spatial relations and consumption as well as urban planning and design decision-making provides new insights into material, ideological and metaphorical aspects of the urban environment.  Reliance on ethnography of space and place allows researchers to present an experience-near account of everyday life in urban housing or local markets, while at the same time addressing macro-processes such as globalization and the new urban social order.    
    This course sketches some of the methodological implications of the ethnographic study of the contemporary city using anthropological tools of participant observation, interviewing, behavioral mapping, and theories of space and place to illuminate spaces in modern/post-modern cities and their transformations.  In doing so, I wish to underscore links between the shape, vision and experience of cities and the meanings that their citizens read off screens and streets into their own lives. It begins with a discussion of spatializing culture, that is the way that culture is produced and expressed spatially, and the way that space reflects and changes culture. The subsequent weeks explore different theoretical dimensions, embodied space, the social construction of space, the social production of space, language and discursive space, and translocal and transnational space. The course also explores a number of special topics including how urban fear is transforming the built environment and the nature of public space both in the ways that we are conceiving the re/building our cities, and in the ways that residential suburbs are being transformed into gated and walled enclaves of private privilege and public exclusion.  The privatization of public space first signaled the profound changes that American cities are undergoing in terms of their physical, social and cultural design.  Currently, however, increased fear of violence and others particularly in urban areas is producing new community and public space forms; locked neighborhoods, blank faced malls in urban areas, armed guard dogs on public plazas, and limited access housing developments are just some examples of how the cultural mood is being “written” on the landscape.
    
Course Requirements:
1. Weekly reading and discussion in class.  Each student will be assigned a week to present a reading review and act as the discussion facilitator.


ANTH 70700/MUS 83100 Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Music and Revolution: Perspectives from the Middle East and North Africa
Prof. Jonathan Shannon Mondays 6:30-8:30
[27749]
In this seminar we will analyze the role of musical practices in advancing the social movements that have marked the Middle East and North Africa across the 20th and into the 21st centuries. While focusing on the recent rebellions and revolutions of the Arab Uprisings, we will also situate the role of music in social movements historically, beginning with the earliest reform movements and revolutions in Egypt and Turkey, through mid-century developments in North Africa, the Iranian Revolution of 1979, up until today. We will focus our discussion on how musical practices not only reflect social changes in these case studies, but can promote them as well. Our exploration of case studies from the region will be preceded by theoretical readings on music, social movements, and revolution from the disciplines of anthropology, musicology, Middle East Studies, and related fields. As a result of this seminar, students will develop a stronger appreciation for the role of music in social change, an analytical grasp of theories of social mobilization, and an understanding of the main historical moments of the Middle East and North Africa region. Students will craft a research paper of 25 pages in addition to keeping a reading journal and sit for two examinations.


ART 86020 Seminar: Selected Topics in Modern Art: No Man's Land: Art and World War I
Prof. Remy Golan Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27424]

World War I was—ironically and tragically--the historical avant-gardes’ “great muse.” Whether they celebrated the Great War (Futurism) or abhorred it (dada/Surrealism) all early 20th-century avant-gardes were energized by the conflict. On its centenary commemoration this seminar will assess past and present interpretations of the visual and to some extent literary culture of the war. The older scholarship was concerned with an art of retrenchments and retreats (the neo-classical body and the Call to Order), the war monument as lieux de mémoire, the link between painting and the miasma of the trench. The more recent scholarship emphasizes the link between new media, shell-shock, and WWI as the first global event (i.e. the photomontage, the Calligramme poem, Aby Warburg’s Picture Atlas); the link between automatism, the “talking cure” and bureaucracy; prosthetics as a form of Readymade, distancing as “cool conduct”; the anachronism of the last war panoramas versus cinema; poetry as performance-score; the manifesto as and antidote to the specter of boredom. Readings will include: Guillaume Apollinaire, André Breton, Philippe Soupault, Robert Graves, F.T. Marinetti, Ernst Jünger, Georges Didi-Huberman, Paul Fussel, Ian Hacking, Friedrick Kittler, Helmut Lethen, Pierre Nora, Edoardo Sanguineti, Peter Sloterdijk, Klaus Theweleit, Paul Virilio.


ART 86020 Seminar: Selected Topics in Modern Art: Postwar Italian Art
Prof. Emilly Braun Tuesdays 9:30-11:30 [27422]

Focusing on the decades 1945- 1975, this seminar considers post-war Italian art chronologically and thematically, from the careers of individual artists and histories of major movements to issues of gender, materials, politics, cultural theory and historiography. The course will begin with a foundational background lecture in Italian art before 1945 and conclude with a look at contemporary art practice and Italian identity. Classes will consist of informal lectures, reading assignments and discussions, and museum and gallery visits. The viewing of a series of films outside of class time will also be mandatory, for those who are not already familiar with them. Students will work on a major research paper to be presented in class and submitted at the end of the semester. One of the chief aims of the course is revisionist: to move outside the now standard framework of the Cold War; explore international networks through exhibitions and periodicals; and challenge longstanding perceptions of anti-Americanism and categorical one-way influences in Italian art with more nuanced interpretations.


ART 86030 Seminar: Selected Topics in Modern Architecture, Urbanism, and Design: Race, Space, and Architecture
Prof. Marta Gutman Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27426]

Focusing principally on the United States, this graduate seminar will consider the history of American architecture in relationship to race, space, culture, and power. Dissecting the social construction of race in concert with buildings, landscapes, and cities will expose how Americans have used space to condition understandings of race, to reinforce racial and ethnic hierarchies, to perform identities, which are in flux, and to contest egregious and enduring inequalities. Readings that focus on historically specific places, from plantations to freedom schools, will be coupled with theories of race, space, and material culture and memoires, fiction, and narratives. The goal is to understand that there is a dynamic rather than a static relationship between a physical place, its social make-up, and race as an ideal or imagined condition. Race, space, and architecture will be framed in relationship to inequality, ethnicity, segregation, authority, racism, gender and sexuality, protest, civil rights, ghettos, ethnic enclaves, liberation movements, civil disobedience, and the design professions.


ART 89000 Seminar: Selected Topics in Art History: Documentary after Conceptual Art
Prof. Siona Wilson Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [27427]

If Pop Art brought about the reconsideration of the photographic image in relation to the commodity form (the readymade, spectacle culture, etc.), for Conceptual Art photography became another kind of “artless” informational document for dissemination. The relationship between the photograph as “document” and the practice of social documentary, however, remained a tenuous one in the 1960s, but the 1970s began to see a strengthening of these links and a growing critical exploration of photography’s social reference. At the same time both artists and critics began a renewed engagement with and critical interrogation of the last significant moment of social documentary, the 1930s. This inaugurated a reconsideration of the photographic image within expanded heterodox modes of practice including for example, time-based work (performance and film) and archiving projects. Beginning with key writings on the use of photography within Conceptual practice, this seminar will examine recent critical literature on documentary photography and media theory. We will use this intellectual base to develop new approaches to the proliferation of documentary modes in contemporary art.


ART 89400/THEA 81600 Seminar in Film Theory: Theories of the Cinema
Prof. Amy Herzog Mondays 11:45-3:45 [27428]

This class will provide an overview of significant movements, debates, and figures in film theory. Readings will span both classical and contemporary film theory, addressing a range of approaches including realism, structuralism, auteur theory, genre criticism, psychoanalytic film theory, feminist and critical race theories, and third cinema. The class will examine writings on cinema in their historical and national contexts, looking at the ways in which film theory intersects with political, cultural, and aesthetic trends. The final sessions of the course will focus on recent developments in film theory, in particular the debates surrounding cognitive approaches to film, the evolution of digital technology, and the writings of philosopher Gilles Deleuze. In each case, new theoretical work on cinema will be read in relation to the complex history of film criticism. In addition, the class will examine the field of film theory alongside related fields of aesthetics and representation (e.g. art history and photography, television studies, cultural studies, visual studies, postmodernism), exploring the ways these disciplines have overlapped.


CL 80100 Novel Theory
Prof. John Brenkman Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [27057]

A hundred years ago Georg Lukács inaugurated a new field of study with The Theory of the Novel. Since then, novel theory has emerged as a distinctive form of reflection on literature—whether grappling with the history of the novel or new novelistic forms, whether debating periodization or the scope of realism, whether establishing traditions or contesting canons, whether criticizing society or affirming democracy or postulating utopia. Novel theory also sustains a creative strife with formalism and narrative theory. And since the novel is a genre without clear or fixed genre boundaries, novel theorists inevitably must draw a line between novel and non-novel: Lukács says Dostoevsky does not write novels, while Bahktin takes Dostoevesky as the defining instance of the novelistic. In the seminar, we will survey this rich century of novel theory and its conflicting protagonists: Lukács and Bahktin, Auerbach and Barthes, Jameson and Kundera, and so on. During the seminar, we will take Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov as a benchmark, and each participant will be asked to make a presentation on a novel of his or her choosing in relation to a problem in novel theory. TEXTS: Georg Lukács, The Theory of the Novel; Mikhail Bahktin, The Dialogical Imagination; Roland Barthes, S/Z; Milan Kundera, Testaments Betrayed; Franco Moretti (ed.), Novel, Volume 2; Michael McKeon (ed.), Theory of the Novel; Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov.


CL 88300 Ideology, Education, and Nation Building: Reading and Writing in Post-Unification Italy
Prof. Morena Corradi Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [27059]

This course will address the issue of nation building and its unfolding in post-unification Italy through the analysis of seminal literary works as well as articles from political and popular papers and journals of the 1860s, 70s, and 80s. The focus of the course will revolve around the idea of “making Italians” understood as a political project as well as an educational one. In this respect we will look at the politics of and dominant ideas on education as portrayed in fiction as well as newspaper articles and commentaries. Analyzing the unfolding of approaches to education in this period will prove useful in order to better understand the nation-building process and its ideological foundations as well as its contradictions. Besides the reading of some canonical works by Nievo, Collodi, De Amicis, which helped shape the imaginary in and of post-unification Italy, the course will look at narratives and articles appeared in major post-unification journals, published by Sonzogno and Treves, in which mainstream ideological positions were countered by contributions and editorials offering different perspectives on the nation-building process and educational needs of the newly unified State. The material we will read is representative of the complex cultural and ideological scenario which characterized the unification period and which has been brought to the foreground by recent historiography. The study both of popular literature and paper articles and editorials is meant to help us address the relatively new readings of the Risorgimento and post-Risorgimento period which have been greatly enhanced by an investigation of culture and society. Course material will include secondary literature tackling the political and philosophical background to the central issues of the course as well as material shedding light on issues such as editorial policies, post-unification readership, and printed media accessibility.


CL 89200 History of Literary Theory and Criticism II
Prof. Charity Scribner Mondays 4:15-6:15 [27061]

A study of the development of thought about literature from the eighteenth century to the present, with readings from Kant, Schiller, Wordsworth, Arnold, Woolf, Tolstoy, Bakhtin, Lukács, Benjamin, Barthes, and Kristeva. This course will not only address issues pertaining to the evolution of modern aesthetics, but it will also examine current critical methodology.


CL 81000/HIST 72400/PSC 71903 Adventures in Marxism: From the Communist Manifesto to Alain Badiou
Prof. Richard Wolin Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27386]

“Je ne suis pas Marxiste!” Karl Marx, cited by Engels, 1882 In his “Theses on Feuerbach” (1846) Marx, seeking to free himself from Hegel’s tutelage, famously declared that, “Heretofore, philosophers have only interpreted the world; however, the point is to change it!” At the time, little did Marx realize the immense historical influence his ideas and doctrines would have. For decades to come, Marx’s theories would inspire intellectuals and political activists in Europe, Latin America, and Asia – although, often in ways that would have undoubtedly astonished Marx himself. After all, the first “successful” communist revolution occurred not in a highly industrialized society, as Marx had prophesied, but instead in Tsarist Russia: a nation that had only recently freed its serfs and that was still largely agrarian. Although as late as 1956, Jean-Paul Sartre could still refer to Marxism optimistically as, “The unsurpassable philosophy of our time,” following World War II, with the rising tide of decolonization, the torch of World Revolution had clearly passed (in the words of Franz Fanon) to the “wretched of the earth” – to the denizens of the so-called “Third World.” To add to this litany of well-known paradoxes: in contemporary China, one of the few remaining communist nations, Marxism has paradoxically become the reigning ideology of a society that is unabashedly oriented toward exponential economic growth and conspicuous consumption. (Or, as Deng Xiaoping proclaimed during the early 1980s: “To get rich is glorious!”) Looking back from 1989 – the watershed year in which the Marxist regimes of Eastern Europe unraveled with breathtaking rapidity – intellectuals and pundits openly wondered whether the time had finally come to write Marxism’s epitaph. However, in light of the rise of neo-liberalism and the prodigious rise of social inequality, forecasts concerning Marxism’s demise would seem premature. Our primary focus will be the legacy of Marxist thought. As such, we will begin by examining the way in which Marx’s youthful confrontation with Hegel prepared the ground for the development of his notion of “historical materialism.” But very quickly, under the tutelage of the later Engels and the Second International, this conception congealed into a dogmatic body of received truths, precipitating what some have called the “crisis of Marxism.” At the time, one of the main responses to Marxism-in-crisis was “Leninism”: the idea that, since the European proletariat seemed increasingly lethargic, a vanguard party was required in order to focus its attention on the long-term goal of world revolution. Under the guise of a “return to Hegel,” and as an antidote to Soviet Marxism, the interwar period witnessed an efflorescence of philosophical Marxism. Among the highlights of this movement were Lukács’ History and Class Consciousness as well as the work of Walter Benjamin and the Frankfurt School – a renewal Marxist thought that has been largely responsible for the postwar renaissance of “critical Marxism.” More recently, in books such as Revolution at the Gates, Slavoj Zizek has encouraged a “return to Lenin.” Similarly, the French Maoist, Alain Badiou, in part inspired by Sartre, has sought to resurrect Marx’s theory of the “subject.” Insisting that, as a critique of capitalism, Marxism has lost none of its historical relevance, Badiou claims that, by learning from its past defeats, Marxism can be resurrected.


ENGL 76200 Body, Affect, Landscape: Postcolonial Reckonings
Prof. Meena Alexander Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [27360]

How do issues of affect and embodiment play into postcolonial concerns with marked bodies, haunted landscapes, anxious histories? We will consider migration and displacement, bodies that are racially and sexually marked, public space and with it the shifting nature of cultural memory. Our exploration of affect and its intensities as crystallized in language, will include Ismat Chughtai’s short story `Lihaaf’ (`The Quilt’, 1942) about a high born woman and her maid -- a pair of lesbian lovers -- which drew the attention of the British colonial government. Chughtai was hauled into Lahore court under the Obscenity Laws. We will read fiction by writers such as Ananda Devi, M Ondaatje, U C Ali Farrah, A R Gurnah, poems by K Das, A.K.Ramanujan, and the New York poet A Notley. Questions of passage across the Indian Ocean, a liminal existence and with it the need to refashion the self emerge in autobiographical writings by M.K.Gandhi, A Ghosh and M Alexander. We will consider the phenomenological insights of Merleau-Ponty and work by theorists such as Appadurai, Bhabha , Berlant, Deleuze and Guattari, Debord, Gunew, Massumi, Merleau-Ponty, Sedgwick, Spivack, Stewart and Virno. In addition a short segment of the course will consider the concept of rasa from classical Indian aesthetics and its implications for contemporary affect theory. This course will be run as a seminar with weekly readings, students presentations and a final research paper. In response to readings there will presentations each week by students in class. Books for purchase will be on order at Book Culture, 536 W 112 St (between Broadway and Amsterdam): M. Alexander, Fault Lines; A Devi, Indian Tango; Z Bauman, Identity;A Ghosh, In An Antique Land; M Ondaatje, The Cat’s Table; Kathleen Stewart, Ordinary Affects; Paolo Virno, A Grammar of the Multitude. Essays and other materials will be uploaded into the drop box for the course.


ENGL 80400 Queerin(ing) Critique
Prof. Kandice Chuh Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27367]]

This course is organized around two questions: 1) what is queer critique?, and 2) what does it mean to queer critique? To address them, we'll read some of the hallmark texts in queer theory especially as it relates to cultural studies (including but not limited to work by Eve Sedgwick, Michel Foucault, Rod Ferguson, Lauren Berlant, José Esteban Muñoz, Siobhan Somerville, Jacqui Alexander, Jack Halberstam, and Judith Butler), and some of the work that has arguably queered the critical paradigms dominant in certain discourses and fields (including but not limited to work by David Eng, Gayatri Gopinath, Licia Fiol-Matta, Robert Reid-Pharr, Lisa Duggan, Madhavi Menon, and William Cohen). Our aim will be not only to pay sustained attention to queer critique as an analytic approach and intellectual tradition, but also to consider the extent to which critique itself may be fashioned as queer -- i.e., as non-normative, politically engaged, involved with matters of desire and attachment, erotics and embodied knowledge. In the course of our discussions, we'll attempt to apprehend some of the key terms and concepts organizing contemporary queer critique -- e.g., affect, materiality, homonormativity, and temporality among others. Students registering for two credits should expect to submit two short-ish writing assignments. Students registering for four credits should expect to submit two short-ish assignments and a longer seminar paper or the equivalent.


ENGL 85410 Character: The Commodification of Subjectivity
Prof. Marc Dolan Mondays 11:45-1:45 [27369]

This course is about the construction and continuity of character—how a character is perceived as “round,” “whole,” or “consistent,” and how those operations have been transformed over the last two centuries. We will probably begin with Jakobson and Greimas’ work on actantial roles, move through Barthes’ postmodern fragmentation of those ideas, and end with readings in media studies and/or industrial studies on the interaction among showrunners, performers, and broad and narrow fandoms. Specific case studies may be drawn from James’ and Forster’s theorization of the novel; four centuries of reported Hamlets; the Erikson/Goffman debate and how it is mirrored in Susann’s Valley of the Dolls; Batman and Alice (in and out of Wonderland) as global icons; and the translation of Mexican and Brazilian telenovelas into US network practice. The actual assignments will be tweaked at our early meetings to reflect the interests of the students enrolled in the seminar. No prior theory or methodology is assumed for those who enroll in the course, but an openness to all methodologies and a healthy dialogue among multiple theoretical approaches will be required. With any luck, by the end of the semester we will coin a few terms of our own.


ENGL 81100 Memory and Post-Historicist Temporalities in the Early Modern Period
Prof. Martin Elsky Mondays 6:30-8:30 [27371]

One of the consequences of the mounting critique of historicism has been the rise of memory studies. This course will explore the various ways anachronic memory seeks to replace history in early modern literature and culture. We will begin with an introduction to cultural memory studies, with special emphasis on the construction of a coherent personal and social identity by projecting the past into the present as overlapping temporalities. We will look at the various ways the arts made the past part of everyday life, but we will place special emphasis on works in which the most startling effects are produced by resistance to integration. Throughout the course we will explore the role of memory at a time of uncertain, ambivalent, and conflicted national and religious boundaries. We will look at the period’s most ambitious memory project, the retrieval of classical antiquity. We will attempt to redefine the concept of imitation as anxious and conflicted memory, especially in Petrarch, and then move to classical imitation in England as repressed memory of Roman tyranny in Britain filtered through a variety of ethnic pasts—Celtic, Gothic, and Norman, leading to the manipulation of overlapping pasts to establish national identity, as in Shakespeare. The second half of the course will turn to the period’s other major memory project, religious memory, specifically representations of traumatic memory during England’s Catholic and Protestant reigns. We will consider how Catholics and Protestants remembered their own pasts and expropriated each other’s during times of persecution. We will end this half of the course by considering the memorial re-mapping of the scriptural and medieval Jewish past, including the discovery of Jewish remains in London. The course will conclude with a refreshing reminder look at the period’s iconic meditation on the futility of memory, Thomas Browne’s Urn Burial. In addition to Petrarch, Shakespeare and Browne, readings will include Jonson, Herbert, and Stow, as well as excerpts from Early Modern historiography, both Catholic and Protestant, and art historical materials. Assignments include oral report and longer term project.


ENG 75000 Unsettled States: Rethinking Canonicity and Geography in Early US Literature
Prof. Duncan Faherty Mondays 4:15-6:15 [27375]

Previous configurations of early U.S. cultural production often framed the first decades of the Republic as characterized by issues of expansion, increased enfranchisement, consolidation, and progressive development. This course seeks to confront these residual figurations by thinking about how fracture, partisanship, ambiguity, and unsettlement might more generatively shape our engagement with this period. Moving beyond the contours of a mythic exceptionalist geography, we will explore emergent critical interest in the hemispheric, transnational, Atlantic, Black Atlantic, circum-Atlantic, and Oceanic dimensions of early U.S. cultural production; in so doing, we will attend to how varyingly literary geographies obscure or illuminate divergent bodies and canons. We will also consider how these spatial paradigms work in tandem with temporal ones by immersing ourselves in the “new critical interest in questions of history, temporality, and periodicity” which, as Dana Luciano notes, has troubled “the when of our field,” by complicating “the reflexive habits of periodization that organize fields [and, perhaps, canons] according to distinct and self-evident centuries.” In particular we will consider how the Haitian Revolution and the Louisiana Purchase unsettled and reoriented cultural and political life in the United States, by taking up the challenge of trying to map how these events often appear, in Michael Drexler and Ed White’s accounting, through the use of a kind of “distorted articulation.” We will also seek to read “cartographically,” following what Andy Doolen has registered as the way texts “were embedded in the process of territorialization, explicitly addressing issues of possession and ownership” so as to legitimize a range of state and non-state sanctioned actions and behaviors. As such, we will grapple with the shifting structures of feeling that define notions of democracy, empire, citizenship, and nation in the early Republic; moreover, we will investigate how the “feelings of structure” serve to manage, manipulate, contain, and exclude particular bodies and possibilities from those emerging and contingent definitions. Finally, part of our consideration of questions about canonicity will take the form of archival research, as well as an exploration of the challenges and rewards of “recovery” work. In addition to our critical readings, we will consider a wide range of period texts including works by: Olaudah Equiano, Thomas Jefferson, Phillis Wheatley, J. Hector St. John de Crevecoeur, John Marrant, Lewis & Clark, Susanna Rowson, Isaac Mitchell, Leonora Sansay, Charles Brockden Brown, Martha Meredith Read, Tabitha Tenney, Timothy Flint, Robert Montgomery Bird, David Walker, Rebecca Rush, Washington Irving, William Wells Brown, James Fenimore Cooper, William Apess, Herman Melville, and Martin Delany. Course Requirements: Active and engaged class participation, one ten minute oral report, an archival presentation, a prospectus for the final paper, and a final 20-25 page seminar paper. To get a sense of the kinds of questions we will be exploring about canonicity and recovery, interested parties should take a look at the following two projects: The Just Teach One Project: Early American Literature http://www.common-place.org/justteachone/ & The Just Teach One Project: Early African American Print http://www.common-place.org/jtoaa/


ENGL 84300 Cognitive Theory, Victory Physiological Psychology, and the Novel
Prof. Gerhard Joseph Mondays 1:45-3:45 [27387]

Recent applications of neuroscience to literary studies—grounded in the challenge of neuroscience to psychoanalysis and other twentieth-century psychological regimes—may be said to have their origins in the “New Psychology” (Alexander Bain) of the mid-to-late century Victorians. This course will look at the Victorian Mind/Brain problem as “conscious”/ “unconscious cerebration” (Frances Power Cobb, William Carpenter as representative anticipators of psychoanalysis, behaviorism, and neuroscientific biologism) in four kinds of works: 1) the commentary on mind in Victorian physiological psychology by the Victorians themselves (Alexander Bain, G.H. Lewes, Herbert Spencer), 2) 21st-century characterization of Victorian to Modern Cognition (George Levine, Rick Rylance, Amanda Anderson, Nicholas Dames), 3) recent neuro-aesthetic applications of a Victorian theory of mind to novels (Kay Young and Lisa Zunshine) and 4) cognitive cultural theory run-throughs of such canonical works as Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, George Eliot’s Middlemarch, Wilkie Collins’ The Moonstone, Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the d’Urbervilles, Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, Albert Camus’ The Stranger and Richard Powers’ The Echo Maker. Requirements: an oral report and a term paper.


ENGL 87300 Ontologies of Vibration: Sound Studies
Prof. Eric Lott Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [27391]

If, as Henri Lefebvre wrote, “sovereignty implies ‘space,’” how does sound produce space and intervene in the power relations that define it? Who has the right at any given moment to legislate and regulate sound? How does it take up the everyday soundscape of its location—clipped speech, screeching industry, the sound of the street, crickets chirping—and give it significant form? Sound as exclusionary, and as a mode of self-possession: music and music-making take up space—organize and announce new collectivities, confer rights, produce obstructions and transgressions, the latter also known as “noise.” The cultural history of sound might be written by observing who at any given moment has the right to say “you are hurting my ears,” as Carlo Rotella has written of urban blues. This seminar will investigate a wide range of issues arising from the last few decades in sound studies. We’ll survey some of the most provocative theoretical work on sound, soundscapes, and music’s relation to space, politics, and the body, including thinkers such as John Cage, Ralph Ellison, Amiri Baraka, Roland Barthes, Jacques Attali, Wayne Koestenbaum, Christopher Small, Alexandra Vazquez, Suzanne Cusick, David Suisman, Douglas Kahn, Jose Esteban Munoz, and Fred Moten. Theoretical readings will be paired with apposite musical and sonic examples, from John Philip Sousa to punk, sonic warfare to sonic booms. We may delve into certain classics of pop music scholarship—Greil Marcus’s Mystery Train (1975), Tricia Rose’s Black Noise (1994), Tim Lawrence’s Love Saves the Day (2004). We will examine lived, contested spaces of sound, whole vibrational ontologies, from bustling “urban crisis” New York to racially segmented pop capital Los Angeles, Sunbelt soul studios and “Chicago School” blues lounges and house dance floors—collective, and therefore spatial, world-making (and –breaking) interventions performed by American musics.


ENGL 80600 Memoir/Illness/Graphic/Grief
Prof. Nancy K. Miller Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [27394]

“Considering how common illness is, how tremendous the spiritual change that it brings, how astonishing, when the lights of health go down, the undiscovered countries that are then disclosed…it becomes strange indeed that illness has not taken its place with love and battle and jealousy among the prime themes of literature.” Virginia Woolf’s On Being Ill is the first literary work we will read, even if contemporary nonfiction and fiction have long since belied Woolf’s lament. Illness occupies a prominent place in postwar culture, and the seminar will explore the stories of what happens when “the lights of health go down” through a wide range of literary and visual representations of bodily and mental suffering, including AIDS, cancer, depression, and mourning. Among the writers and artists: Roland Barthes, Simone de Beauvoir, Lucy Grealy, Audre Lorde, Paul Monette, Oliver Sacks, Eve Sedgwick, and Susan Sontag; graphic narratives by Bobby Baker, David B., Miriam Engelberg, David Small, and Nicola Streeten. The work of the course: weekly responses, one oral presentation, a final paper.


ENGL 87100 The Rise of the Novel
Prof. David Richter Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27397]

During the "long eighteenth century" (1660-1830), most of the major innovations in both subject matter and narrative technique take shape. At its beginning the art of fiction often involves the close imitation of true narratives, while at its end fictional narrative both competes with and contributes to the writing of historical narrative. Throughout the period, form (in the sense of aesthetic ideology) exerts intense pressure upon content, while content (the social and sexual conflicts of the period, along with the growing force of nationality) exerts a counterpressure upon literary form. We shall read some of these most important canonical texts within and against the culture that formed them, a culture that took its own shape, at least in part, from the rise of the novel. In addition to exploring the narratives of the eighteenth century, we will also explore another set of narratives, the works of literary history in which scholars from the past sixty years have attempted to explain the origins of the English novel. Ian Watt's The Rise of the Novel (1957) was the master narrative against which recent literary historiographers have staged their own counter-histories, including Michael McKeon, Ralph Rader, Lennard Davis, Catherine Gallagher, Nancy Armstrong, and Margaret Doody. Requirements for 4 credits: one oral report on recent criticism of the primary text for the day plus a research paper; for 2 credits: oral report and full participation.


ENGL 84200 Freedom and Necessity: Philosophical and Literary Positions 1750-1820
Prof. Alexander Schlutz Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27399

During the long eighteenth century, the philosophical and literary debate over the freedom of the human will pits necessitarians against libertarians, empiricists and materialists against idealists and transcendentalists. It marks the Enlightenment and Romanticism equally and allows for an assessment of the continuities and discontinuities between the two periods. The problem of human freedom is also a driving force of Immanuel Kant's critical project, which hinges on Kant's positioning of the power of aesthetic judgment as the bridge between the empirical laws of nature and the moral laws of human freedom. Via Kant's Critique of Judgment, where the questions of human freedom and morality become aesthetic questions, the centrality of art and aesthetics in the Romantic period emerges on the background of the eighteenth-century debate over the freedom of the will. We will discuss the philosophical positions of David Hume, William Godwin, and Immanuel Kant in order to examine the development of the debate over the course of the second half of the eighteenth century and to gain a better understanding of its turn to aesthetics in the Romantic period. To investigate how this aesthetic turn manifests itself in literary practice, we will focus on the texts of P.B. Shelley and Friedrich Schiller, two authors whose texts are deeply informed by the philosophical debates of their time. For both Shelley and Schiller questions of freedom and necessity are of particular importance, and their texts probe the role art and poetry might play in the moral improvement of humankind in paradigmatic fashion.


FREN 86200 Textes et Théories du Théâtre au Vingtième Siècle
Prof. David Jones Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [27722]

Ubu Roi marque une rupture avec le théâtre du dix-neuvième siècle, et la lecture de cette pièce sera notre point de départ pour une exploration des mouvements et innovations dans le théâtre au vingtième siècle. On parlera des sujets et des auteurs suivants : le surréalisme (Vitrac, Cocteau), le théâtre de la cruauté (Artaud), l’existentialisme (Sartre), le théâtre dit de « l’absurde » (Genet, Beckett), et l’influence de la critique poststructuraliste (déconstruction, féminisme, postcolonialisme) sur le théâtre (Duras, Gatti, Cixous, Tremblay, Césaire). Liste facultative de lectures: Artaud : Le Théâtre et son double Beckett : En Attendant Godot; Pas moi Césaire : Une Tempête Cixous : L’Histoire terrible mais inachevée de Norodom Sihanouk, roi du Cambodge Cocteau : Orphée Duras : India Song Gatti : La Vie imaginaire de l’éboueur Auguste G. Genet : Les Bonnes; Les Nègres Jarry : Ubu Roi Sartre : Huis clos Tremblay : Les Belles sœurs Vitrac : Victor ou les enfants au pouvoir.


FREN 79140 Crowds in North Africa
Prof. Andrea Khalil Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [27720]

Yasmina Khadra, Assia Djebar, Anouar Benmalek). We will look at literature in light of predominant crowd theories including European theory (Le Bon and Canetti) as well as theorists specifically concerned with North Africa (e.g. Ibn Khaldoun, Pierre Bourdieu, Edmund Burke). We will consider the notion of ‘group feeling’ as a concept with deep roots in the region’s cultural history and how this concept has manifested in literatures of national liberation and post-colonial resistance movements. Course expectations: Students will read on average one book per week, whether a theory text or a novel. In addition to the weekly readings and classroom discussions, each student will be asked to give a presentation either on one of the novels or on a crowd event and present a theoretical analysis of the event/novel engaging one or more of the assigned theoretical texts. Before turning in their research paper students will submit a proposal, first draft and final draft. For students taking the course for 4 credits, the final paper will be 25 pages and for 2 credits the final paper will be 10 pages. The class will be conducted in English and the texts are available in English. A significant number of these texts exist in French (many are written originally in French) and French original versions can be used. Goals: After having taken this course students will have an in depth knowledge of several North African novels and authors. Students will not only gain an understanding of various crowd theories but also learn how to apply them critically to the interpretation of literary texts as well as political and social events in North Africa. For any questions write to: andrea.khalil@qc.cuny.edu.Preliminary reading list: • Anouar Benmalek, Abduction. • Gustave Le Bon. La psychologie des foules/ The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind. • Pierre Bourdieu. ‘The Social Space and the Genesis of Groups’ in Theory and Society 14: 723-44. • Edmund Burke III. ‘Understanding Arab Protest Movements.’ in Arab Studies Quarterly 8: 333–45. • Elias Canetti, Crowds and Power/Pouvoir et puissance. • Assia Djebar, Le blanc d’Algérie/Algerian White. • Assia Djebar, Les enfants du nouveau monde/Children of the New World. • Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri. Multitude: War and Democracy in the Age of Empire. • Yasmina Khadra, La part du mort/Dead Man’s Share. • Ibn Khaldoun,The Muqqadimah. (Translation by F. Rosenthal, Princeton UP). • Kateb Yacine, Nedjma.


FREN 87000 Feminist Theories
Prof. Domna Stanton Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [27725]

This course will examine the various strains of feminist thought since the l970s, and strains within feminist theoretical positions. Beginning with conflicts around postructuralism and postmodernism, we will then analyze the women's studies/ gender studiesissue; the paradigm shift that writing of women of color represented; the sex wars; écriture féminine; the essentialist debates; Foucault and feminism; postcolonial and transnational feminisms; women's rights as human rights; material feminisms, class and social inequalities; and queer, transgender and ze. We will also consider the necessary but often problematic connections between advocacy and activism to theoretical work (praxis); and the future of feminist theories and their relation to other oppositional practices. The course will end with a brief presentation of some of the theories we did not discuss: ecocriticism, disability studies, the posthuman. Work for the course: Whether the course is taken for 2, 3, or 4 credits, all students will be reponsible for doing the readings closely and for engaging consistently in class discussion. a Students who take the course for 2 credits will present in class a critical reading of one theoretical text, a reading that will also be submitted in writing (c 5-7 pp); these students will also take the final exam. b Students who take the course for 3 credits, will do all of the above and in addition, they will do a 10-page paper on a topic they select, in consultation with the instructor. They will also submit a thesis statement, a bibliography and an outline (the schedule will be indicated on the syllabus). c Students who take the course for 4 credits will do all of the above, but instead of a 10-page paper, they will do a 20-25 page paper on a topic they select, after consultation with the instructor; they will also submit a thesis statement, a bibliography and an outline (the scheduled will be indicated on the syllabus). All readings and the syllabus for the course will be posted on Blackboard by January 26, 2015 at the latest. Goals of the course: to be become conversant in the various theoretical strains in feminist thought from 1970s to today. to develop a capacity to read feminist theoretical texts critically to write analyses and critiques of theoretical texts (for the final exam; for their class presentations; and either in the 10 -page paper (3 credits) or the 20-25 page paper (4 credits). Please address all questions to domna stanton (dstanton112@yahoo.com).


SPAN 85000 Lorca, Buñuel, Dalí: Literature, Cinema. Image
Prof. Paul-Julian Smith Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [27180]

This course, which is taught in Spanish, treats the drama of Federico García Lorca, selected silent and Spanish-language films of Buñuel, and fine art works by Dalí. It involves close reading of these texts and analysis of the voluminous and contradictory body of criticism on them. The course addresses such themes as tradition and modernity; the city and the country; and the biopic in film and television. The question of intermediality, or the relation between different media, will be examined in its historical and theoretical dimensions. The course will graded by final paper (50%), midterm exam (25%), and final presentation, weekly postings to course website and oral contribution to class (25%).


SPAN 87100 Music’s Letter: Latin American Literature and Musical Thought
Prof. Lucia Fiol-Matta Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [27184]

This course considers a variety of Latin American prose works from the perspective of musical thinking and the "acoustic turn" of the last decade or so, examining a distinct literary corpus in dialogue with the musical, broadly understood. Philosophy and narrative in multiple traditions have been concerned with the musical in its various forms as a form of thought (Mallarmé, Nietzsche, Mann), but the topic of music and acoustic thinking in Latin American literature remains relatively understudied, even though it is a critically important aspect of literature's engagement with a sensorium and indispensable to any consideration of aisthesis. Sub-topics include nation, modernity and modernism, poetics, sense, music's relationship to the political, music as a form of either high or pop culture and the implications of this partition, and subcultures. We will examine anthropological texts, such as Lydia Cabrera's El Monte and treatises by Fernando Ortiz, alongside ethnomusicological works such as Alejo Carpentier's Music in Cuba, to properly literary texts that thematize the presence of the musical: from twentieth century greats Jorge Luis Borges, Manuel Puig, José María Arguedas, and Guillermo Cabrera Infante, to contemporary works by writers such as Margo Glantz, Andrés Caicedo, Marcelo Cohen, Antonio José Ponte, and Alberto Fuguet.


SPAN 87100 Mexican Narcoimaginaries: State, Politics, and Literary Representations of the Drug Trade
Prof. Oswaldo Zavala Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [27182]

A proliferation of narconarratives has emerged in Mexico in the last two decades. Most of these literary representations of the drug trade tend to focus on a mythology of criminality that often erases the constitutive role of the State in organized crime. The present course will explore the political dimension of what is known as narco. We will trace the recent history of literature as it either reifies or resists hegemonic discourses on drug trafficking. For such a purpose we will examine novels, short stories and poetry published in the 1990s and 2000s by a diversity of authors such as Víctor Hugo Rascón Banda, Roberto Bolaño, Daniel Sada, César López Cuadras and Miguel Ángel Chávez Díaz de León, among others. We will analyze their narconarratives through an interdisciplinary theoretical framework drawing from the works of Pierre Bourdieu, Alain Badiou, Michel Foucault, Jacques Rancière, Carl Schmitt, Ernesto Laclau, Chantal Mouffe, Antonio Gramsci, and Antoine Compagnon, among others. We will incorporate as well the most updated work by key sociologists, journalists and literary critics studying the phenomenon of the drug trade, including Luis Astorga, Fernando Escalante Gonzalbo, Miguel Ángel Granados Chapa, Carlos Montemayor, Charles Bowden, Terrence Poppa and Gary Webb. Beyond the recurrent mythical aspects of narconarratives, we will approach the intersection of literature, State power, hegemonic discourses and the geopolitics of organized crime. This course will be conducted in Spanish.


HIST 72600 Deviance and Colonialism
Prof. Satadru Sen Mondays 6:30-8:30 [27246]

A signature characteristic of the modern world is the concern with normalcy and deviance, or rather, the accelerated production of norms and deviations, their diffusion through society, and their policing by a growing network of disciplining institutions. The concept of privacy was invented only to be made public immediately, as Foucault suggested. In this course we shall examine how these processes were affected by the simultaneous encounter between Europe and the colonized world, where the private and the public were both shaken by the intrusion of colonizers, but the universality of Foucauldian modernity broke down. We shall proceed from the understanding that there were, broadly speaking, three dimensions to deviance in colonialism. In one, the colonized world was a treasure-house of deviance, undergoing discovery. In another, the norms of the colonizers showed themselves to be highly unstable, as Europeans were compelled to negotiate culturally, politically and sexually with their new subjects, and discovered in their new tropical settings unforeseen fears and possibilities of falling out of race, class and gender. In the third, the indigenous elites of colonized societies hijacked the categories of normalcy and deviance, used them to articulate their own visions of modernity, authority, resistance and hegemony, and argued fiercely amongst themselves – and with Europeans – about the nature of the Self that might inherit the postcolonial world. The particular focus of the class will be the phenomena of racial degeneracy and regeneration, from mid-nineteenth-century ideas of collective depravity, through their partial replacement by scientific and aesthetic visions of ‘individual’ delinquency, to anti-colonial schemes of national health that intersected with European fascism. Following preliminary readings, students will be encouraged to identity and explore their own areas of deviance.


HIST 72800 Introduction to the History of the Emotions
Prof. Megan Vaughan Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [27251]

This course is designed to introduce students to what is now a large (and in some instances well funded) ‘sub-field’. We’ll begin by tracing the development of the historiography and mapping the dominant theoretical approaches to the historical study of the emotions. We will then look at how these approaches have been applied to specific historical events and processes and with what results. The second half of the course will include the use of source materials which we will examine and analyse together. Students will be encouraged to find their own source materials for this purpose. We’ll ask how far the ‘history of the emotions’ has been genuinely innovative and whether we think it will have a lasting impact. Where does the field go from here? Though focused on historical debates, by its nature this course is interdisciplinary. Introductory reading: ‘AHR Conversation: The Historical Study of Emotions’, American Historical Review (December 2012): 1486-1531 Dixon, Thomas, ‘Emotion: History of a Keyword in Crisis’, Emotion Review, 4,4 (2012), 338-344 Frevert, Ute, Emotions in History: Lost and Found (Budapest, 2011) Susan Matt and Peter Stearns eds, Doing Emotions History (University of Illinois, 2014) Barbara Rosenwein, Emotional Communities In the Middle Ages (Ithaca, 2006) William Reddy, The Navigation of Feeling: a Framework for the History of the Emotions (Cambridge, 2001) Peter Stearns and Carol Stearns, ‘Emotionology: Clarifying the History of Emotions and Emotional Standards’, AHR, 90 (1985), 813-36 Catherine Lutz and Geoffrey White, ‘The Anthropology of the Emotions’, Annual Review of Anthropology, 15 (1986), 405-36


LING 79600/SPAN 80000 The Politics of Language: Ethnic, National, and Geographic Perspectives
Prof. José del Valle Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [27178]

In this seminar (conducted in English), we will focus on the theoretical foundations and disciplinary arrangements that have resulted in different articulations of language and politics. First, we will review the emergence after World War II of classical approaches to language policy and planning (LPP) and their development in contexts associated with nation-building and minority rights. We will then discuss the less institutionalized field of critical linguistics, which, in parallel to the development of critical theory, has broadened the spectrum of phenomena where the political nature of language manifests itself. The seminar will examine three major topics: linguistic nationalism, the linguistic rights of ethnic minorities, and the politics of language in global perspective. The readings will include, among others, Einar Haugen’s The Ecology of Language, Joshua Fishman’s Reversing Language Shift, Benedict Anderson’s Imagined Communities, Eric Hobsbawm’s Nations and Nationalism Since 1780, Robert Phillipson’s Linguistic Imperialism, John Joseph’s Language and Identity and Language and Politics, Monica Heller’s Paths to Post-Nationalism, and Jan Blommaert’s The Sociolinguistics of Globalization.


MUS 84200 Seminar in Theory/Analysis: Topic Theory: Analytical and Critical Issues
Prof. Kofi Agawu Thursdays 2:00-5:00 [27439]

Topic theory is the outcome of a collective research enterprise in which notions of topic (“subjects of musical discourse,” according to Leonard Ratner, the originator of modern topic theory) shape the interpretation of individual works. Rejecting the ostensible neutrality of musical material, topic theorists seek out sedimentations of style, history, pedagogy, convention and affect in music’s sounding forms and speculate on their piece-specific disposition. This seminar will explore some of the analytical and critical issues raised by topic theory. We will inquire into the ontology of topics, sketch a provisional topical universe, perform close readings of selected works, and reflect on more abstract semiotic issues. Readings will be drawn from writings by Ratner, Allanbrook, Hatten, Sisman, Monelle and Mirka, among others. A substantial final essay on an aspect of topic theory will be expected of all participants.


PHIL 77900/PSC 80302 Social Ontology and Democracy
Prof. Carol Gould Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27170]

Despite a large literature on social ontology and an even wider one on democratic theory, there has been little attention to the ways that social ontology can illuminate the hard questions concerning the justification of democracy and its manifold deficiencies in practice. Going beyond existing individualist interpretations of democracy in terms of interests or rights, as well as older communitarian approaches, this seminar will work towards constructing a relational, interactive, and cooperative account of democracy, drawing on analytic, continental, and feminist perspectives. We will bring to bear social ontological work on joint commitment (Gilbert), shared intention (Bratman), the “we-mode” (Tuomela), and collective intentionality (Searle); theories of recognition (Honneth), plurality (Arendt, Levinas), and the critique of “atomic” individualism (Taylor); feminist conceptions of relational autonomy (Nedelsky, Stoljar) and intersectional identities (e.g., Meyers); the social connections model of shared responsibility (Young); group agency and deliberative rationality (Pettit); and the conceptions of individuals-in-relations and positive freedom (Gould). The specific issues we will address include the following: • Can joint action and group agency be explained in individualist terms? What are the implications for understanding democratic institutions and communities, as well as corporate and other nongovernmental actors? • The social justifications for democracy and for political obligation (Gould, Gilbert). • The significance of recent network notions for understanding democratic solidarity and transnational social movements. • The analysis of domination, oppression, and other forms of one-sided recognition within democracies (Young). • Diverse understandings of democracy, e.g., African consultative models (Wiredu). • Group rights—a human right to democracy; cultural rights within democracies and the interpretation of groups in collective or aggregative terms; processes of constitution of social groups and the self-determination of nations. • The problem of collective responsibility: Can individuals, even dissenting ones, be held accountable for the wrongdoing of their governments? Can nation-states as a whole be responsible for such wrongdoing? • The role of historical context in the genesis of democratic norms, and whether norms are essentially constitutive of group action. • The “democratic personality”—The implications of a relational approach for understanding dispositions to empathy and receptivity as they bear on notions of active citizenry and democratic participation. Seminar members will be encouraged to relate the course materials to their ongoing research projects through oral presentations and analytical term papers, and will be expected to be active participants in the class discussions.


PHIL 77000 Psychoanalytic Theories of Agency, Character, and Mind
Prof. Elliot Jurist Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27165]
In this course, we will explore psychoanalytic ideas about the mind, beginning with Freud (the topographical model and the structural model), and then turning to modifications in ego psychology, object relations, relational theory, attachment theory and mentalization theory. We will focus on irrationality as a normal feature of how the mind works and also on the potential insight that comes from understanding pathologies of the mind, reading autobiographical texts about struggling not to lose one’s mind, losing one’s mind, and regaining one’s mind. We will also examine the importance of character types/personality in understanding the mind, with readings from Freud, Reich, Fenichel, Balint, Shapiro, Kernberg, Blatt, and Fonagy. Finally, we will focus on enhanced agency (and perhaps well-being) as the aim of psychoanalytic therapy, integrating theory with clinical accounts and empirical research about autobiographical memories and narratives.


PHIL 76200 History of Aesthetics: Hegel to Nietzsche
Prof. Douglas Lackey Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [27172]

The modern history of aesthetics begins with Hume and Kant, with Hume studying the features of sensibility as they sharpen over time, and Kant seeking universal principles within sensibility that distinguish aesthetic judgments from subjective preferences. American aesthetics, post- World War II, took up where Hume and Kant left off, with Arnold Isenberg treading in Hume’s footsteps, and Frank Sibley and others exploring aesthetic properties in the Kantian vein. But there is one excruciating flaw in the subject- oriented aesthetics of Hume and Kant: it is entirely consistent with the non-existence of art. If art had never begun, hardly a word of Kant’s Critique of Judgment would need to be changed. The post-Kantian romantics would have none of this. Schelling gave art the central role in his metaphysics; Schopenhauer wrote powerfully about metaphysics and music; Hegel in the 1820’s produced four sets of lectures commenting on every period of art history and every genre of art. Nietzsche’s first book focused on Aeschylus and his second book on Wagner. For all these philosophers, the idea that the function of art is to produce pleasurable or exciting sensations was laughable. For all of them the artist was a seer and pioneer, a creator second only to God, an exemplary manifestation of the creative will to power. (Lest this seem extreme, or old fashioned, recall that Nelson Goodman, a philosopher not given much to hysteria, calls artists “worldmakers.”) This course will introduce the student to the great arc of 19th century aesthetic thinking, the philosophers who took art seriously. These texts are in many ways keys to deep currents in 19th century thought. For each philosopher, the background metaphysics will be sketched in, followed by a deeper plunge into the philosophy of art. All texts will be in English translations.


PHIL 77700 Critical Philosophy of Race
Profs. Linda Alcoff and Frank Kirkland Thursdays 11:45-1:45 [27177]

Philosophically critical race theory can be mapped out in 3 stages.
 
1)    Prior to 1985, philosophical discussions about race were conducted primarily along normative lines addressing whether and, if so, how moral or ethical salience should be granted to race and to government policy reliant on it in order to allow, legitimately, for differential treatment amongst racial groups of citizens. Generally Bernard Boxill’s Blacks and Social Justice (1984, 1992) was and still remains the standard bearer for those discussions.
 
2)    Between 1985 and 2000, however, philosophical discussions about race hinged on the question of whether or not race is a “real” or “objective” property and what metaphysical commitments fall from that. In short, they contributed to the idea that the metaphysics of race underwrites the political morality of race, such that any question of race’s moral import rests first on resolving the question of whether race is real or not. They increasingly and predominantly focused on whether race was real as essentialist or socially constructed prior to any discussion of either its moral pertinence/impertinence to racial integration, racial identity or to racial nationalism or its legitimacy/illegitimacy in the framing of public policy acknowledging differential treatment along racial lines. Generally Kwame Anthony Appiah’s In My Father’s House: Africa in the Philosophy of Culture (1992) and [with Amy Gutmann] Color Conscious [1997] have been the standard bearer on this front.
 
3)    Since 2000, philosophical discussions have, for the most part, settled on race as a social construction. But what is important to the debate now is whether (1) race as a social construction invokes some sort of “ought” claim, some set of normative expectations which racially can be met satisfactorily in social interaction. Or whether (2) race as a social construction is set in the normatively default position as “white supremacy” through a “racial contract.” Under (2), normative expectations in (1) regarding race can never truly or effectively have purchase, since “white supremacy” would drape over all things politically, socially, historically and philosophically. Or (1) is modified on pragmatic or strategic grounds all racial demands, such as calls for “black identity and  unity,” which Tommie Shelby’s We Who are Dark (2004) confirms. Generally, however, Charles Mills’ The Racial Contract (1998) has been the standard bearer on this front.
 
The gist of this course is to convey and respond to the arguments and issues raised in the last two stages. Works from the fields of Africana and Latin American philosophies (including besides those listed, Douglass, DuBois, Bolivar, Martí, Mariátegui, Vasconcelos, Anzaldua, Gooding-Williams, Taylor) will be drawn upon to address whether matters concerning race have normative significance or not and whether such matters are the stuff of so-called ideal or non-ideal theorizing. Although the syllabus will give the specific direction of the course, it will still attest to the idea that a normative commitment to a certain kind of racialism (not all kinds, not any kind) will be on the table.


PSC 71901 Contemporary Political Theory
Prof. Robyn Marasco Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [27720]
Our seminar will proceed as close readings of whole books, under the assumption that political theory is best digested in non-excerpted form and that a different group of interpretive muscles are flexed when we linger on a work in its (exhaustive) entirety.  After Rawls, we will turn to The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, Anti-Oedipus, The History of Sexuality, Black Marxism, and Gender Trouble.  This course will be especially useful for students preparing for their comprehensive exams in political theory.


PSC 80301 Transcendence and Public Life
Prof. Susan Buck-Morss Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27213]

This seminar will question the modernist premise of
immanence as the organizing frame of political life. In our global era,
ethical and moral practice may demand more. Political theology meets its challenge in theological politics. Beginning with Theodor W. Adorno¹s lectures on modern moral philosophy (post-Kant), we will consider the continuities of
Christian belief in Western history (Kantorowicz), and Karl Marx¹s secularization of the theological goal. Walter Benjamin¹s early writings will provide a bridge to
Philo of Alexandria¹s 1st-century allegoresis of Jewish Scripture as
Platonic philosophy. We will discover Islam¹s cosmopolitan enhancement of
Aristotlelianism and the Jesuit¹s anti-colonial debt to Andalusian
Judaism. As contemporary examples of theological politics and/as moral practice, we will consider Mahatma Gandhi, Cornel West, Enrique Dussel, and Waed Hallaq. As hermeneutical strategies against theological politics (Carl Schmitt, Salim Sayyid), we will read the Muslima author Jerusha Tanner Lamptey, the late writing of Walter Benjamin, and Talal Asad on the Islamic state.



PSC 80405 Psychoanalysis and Political Thought
Prof. Jack Jacobs Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [27219]

This seminar will be devoted to exploring and debating the hotly contested relationship(s) between psychoanalytic ideas (and of approaches derived from or engaged in dialogue with psychoanalysis) on the one hand
and political theory on the other.  We will focus particular attention this semester on a range of attempts, made over an extended period of time, to link Marxist approaches with psychoanalytic insights, and will attempt to assess the degree to which each of these attempts does – or does not – remain compelling.  Accent will be placed on close reading of classic texts chosen from among the works of such writers as Freud, Jung, Reich, Fromm, Marcuse, Adler, Fanon, Lacan and Althusser.  Students will be encouraged to actively participate, to lead specific class sessions, and to explore their own interests by writing research papers on relevant topics.


PSYC 79200 Current Issues in Psychology
Prof. Susan Saegert Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27632]
This course is the first of two theory courses designed to prepare doctoral students to understand and be able to deploy theoretical positions across the social sciences.   This course focuses on the psychological level of analysis. The theories explored lend themselves to accounts of psychology that can mesh with other levels of analysis.  The course also covers some of the historically important thinkers in environmental and critical social/personality psychology.

 
PSYC 80103 The Study of Lives
Prof. Jason Van Ora Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27651]

A course in the study of lives invites students to grapple with the uniqueness, challenges, and wisdoms of the individual person.  A number of readings spanning both the social sciences and humanities will introduce students to the following central ideas within this interdisciplinary field of study:

1)     Individual lives must be studied and understood within their larger social, cultural, and political contexts.  The study of one person often includes many, many others.

2)     One can study lives for the purpose of addressing a variety of research questions, illuminating the ways in which findings from large-scale research studies particularize within the life stories of individual persons, embracing individual complexity and distinctiveness, and learning more about the particular time and place within which an individual lived.

3)     The study of lives utilizes a variety of methods, which include interviewing, archival analyses, naturalistic and participant observation, and the narrative analysis of memoirs, biographies, and other life histories.


PSYC 80103/U ED 75200 Structural Violence and Radical Possibilities: Designing Critical Educational Studies
Prof. Michelle Fine Mondays 4:15-6:15 [27199]
    Drawing on critical theory (critical race, feminist, post-colonial, queer and critical disability studies) and educational justice movements on the ground, this course will be organized to study the history, and document the present enactments of neoliberal "blues" -- the circuits of dispossession through which current educational policy undermines equity and justice, and also chronicle sites of radical possibility (drawing from Jean Anyon) in and around educational praxis in schools and out, community organizing, labor/solidarity justice and mobilizations for broadened access to higher education.  Students will conduct archival work on historic sites of educational protest and possibility (e.g. freedom schools; literacy campaigns in Cuba) as well as mini-ethnographies at contemporary sites of "radical possibilities" -

Students will draw from urban education, psychology, Africana studies, women/gender studies, public health and the law school.

 
PSYC 80260 Gender and Sexuality Theory
Prof. Deborah Tolman Wednesdays 9:30-11:30 [27678]

In this course, we will read deeply across classic gender and sexuality theories, with an emphasis on feminist and queer theories (Foucault, Butler, Halberstam) as well as an array of theories from psychology and other social sciences that fall outside of critical theory (such as Pfaus, Bancroft and Bailey).  We will also cover some of the most innovative and current theory (including the work of Diamond, C. Fine and McRobbie). Focus will be on developing an understanding of theory and its application. We will interrogate a set of studies (i.e., Fahs, McClelland, Dowsett) in which these theories are utilized.  Readings are both books and articles/book chapters.  Students will be asked to participate in and lead discussions, suggest and present additional readings that enable class discussion of theory, and write a series of short papers.

SOC 84600 Social and Political Subjectivity from Wilhelm Reich to Bernard Stiegler
Prof. Stanley Aronowitz Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [27352]

The problem of social and political subjectivity in contemporary society has occupied increasing attention for the last century. Contrary to expectations the prevailing system of power,  technologically advanced capitalism, has weathered constant storms of wars and depressions that many observers and political activists expected would create systemic crisis and social transformation.  Rather than ascribing capitalism’s survival to the perfidy of the leadership class,tyhis course explores theories and practices that attempt to describe the contours of subjectivity in the context of   social relations. Among the readings:

Reich- “What is Class Consciousness”;  The Mass Psychology of Fascism
Antonio Gramsci- Selections from the Prison Notebooks; Cultural Writings;
Henri Lefebvre- Critique of Everyday Life Volume 3
Deleuze and Guattari- Anti-Oedipus
Guattari- Chaos Philosophy
Maurizio Lazzarato- Signs and Machines
Bernard Stiegler- Symbolic Misery


SOC 85405 Social Change
Prof. Roslyn Bologh Mondays 6:30-8:30 [27350]

The rise of the Occupy Movement and the enormous success of Thomas Picketty’s book, Capital, the cross-disciplinary, international, academic and lay interest and acclaim it has garnered, speak to the significance of political economy.  Political economy causes social changes that have major consequences for social life -- including education, urban life, family life, the environment, immigration, ethnic and race relations, labor relations, and gender relations as well as international relations – also for suicide rates, marriage and divorce rates, single parent rates, rates of morbidity and mortality (including longevity) and more. Part of the appeal of Picketty’s book lies in his emphatic rejection of the narrow economic approach to questions of political economy that he encountered in the U.S. and his espousal, in its stead, of a more comprehensive, sociological, cultural and historical perspective – employing sources as unorthodox as Jane Austen’s novels! What are the changes that have occurred in political economy since the 1970s? How should sociologists, and social scientists more broadly, analyze these changes (sometimes conceived as globalization, financial capitalism, monopoly capitalism, neo-liberalism or post-industrial high tech and service economy) and their consequences for social life today and in the coming years?  We will examine different analytic perspectives to see which one(s) seem most compelling.

 
THEA 70600 History of Theatrical Theory
Prof. Peter Eckersall Mondays 4:15-6:15 [27091]

This course will introduce students to theatrical theory as a research discipline and will examine theories that have influenced contemporary theatre and performance studies. We will begin with a general discussion of what constitutes theory and then proceed modularly to examine such key theatrical and performance concepts as representation, mimesis, dramaturgy, and audience response. A modular structure will allow us to follow and create ongoing dialogues about these concepts as they have evolved. The second objective of the course will be met through, again, a modular approach to the presentation and discussion of such influential critical and cultural theories as formalism and structuralism, semiotics, post-structuralism, deconstruction, feminism, and cultural theory, as well as other disciplinary approaches—coming from, for instance, anthropology, sociology, and psychology—that have transformed theatre and performance.  In addition to the readings, video documentation of performances is suggested for some of the topics and students are invited to bring their own examples of relevant dramatic texts and theatre and performance works into the discussion.


THEA 85600 Studies in Theatre Aesthetics: Mediatized Performance
Prof. Edward Miller Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27098]

This course explores theories and practices of mediatized performance by focusing upon the interlinking of media and theatre in a staged event. We examine the work of directors, choreographers, and artists whose work incorporates and makes visible or audible the use of media, such as William Forsythe, Merce Cunningham, Gob Squad, Ivo von Hove, Elevator Repair Service,  Builders Association, Robert LePage, and the Wooster Group. Key questions include: How integral and apparent is the use of technology to the composition and the aesthetics of the performance? Does the use of projected imagery or remixed sounds serve to enlarge or contain the dimensions of theatrical space? How do instances of mediatized performance transmit and frame the body and voice of the performer? In order to address these concerns we read key texts in performance and media theory by Steve Dixon, Matthew Causey, Josephine Machon, Rebecca Schneider, Steven Connor, DJ Spooky, Peggy Phelan, Philip Auslander, Paul Sanden, Christof Migone, Jonathan Sterne, Jay Bolter, Eduardo Navas, and Lisa Gitelman. The second half of the course focuses on three distinctive mediatized realms: postwar radio drama (including work of Beckett and Artaud), contemporary dance theatre and its use of videated images, and the current digitization of performing arts archives and its ramifications for research, performance history, and the “repertoire.” Student work for the course includes presenting a session’s reading and leading discussion, an abstract that is designed for submission, and a term paper of 15-20 pages. The final class is structured like a conference in which students summarize their research findings.


THEA 86000 Theatre and Society: Rootless Cosmopolitans: Yiddish Theatre and the Aesthetics of Diaspora
Prof. Debra Caplan Thursdays 2:00-4:00 [27099]

How have the experiences of migration, exile, and dislocation intersected with theatre history, aesthetics, and practice? In this course, we will investigate how theatre is produced and how it functions in diasporic contexts, with a particular focus on the history of the Yiddish stage. This seminar is intended both as a historical survey of Yiddish theatre history and as an introduction to diaspora studies for the theatre historian. Readings in diaspora theory across the disciplines (including anthropology, sociology, history, political science, comparative literature, geography, theatre history, performance studies, and musicology) are paired with plays that exemplify particular diasporic traits, themes, or aesthetic sensibilities, with a special focus on Yiddish theatre as a paradigmatic case study. Topics include diaspora aesthetics, multilingualism, double consciousness, theatre of the subaltern, hybridity, nostalgia, adaptation, and diasporic performance in the digital age and readings include plays by Avrom Goldfaden, Jacob Gordin, Peretz Hirschbein, Y.L. Peretz, Alter Kacyzne, Sh. Ansky, H. Leivick, and Dovid Pinsky. We will consider the international, cross-cultural success of plays like The Dybbuk and The Golem alongside historiographic questions about the location of diasporic performance traditions in theatre history. Requirements: Weekly reading assignments, research proposal, oral presentation, 15-20 page research paper. 

This seminar is designed primarily for Political Science graduate students preparing a concentration in political theory, but it is also open to students in Philosophy, Anthropology, Sociology, Women’s Studies, and related fields.  This course provides a rigorous introduction to major works of political theory since the 1971 publication of John Rawls’s A Theory of Justice.  We will launch our study with a close reading of this pivotal work in its entirety and pose questions about why the publication of this book has been claimed as a moment of “revival” for political philosophy.  Was philosophical thinking about politics dead or dormant before Rawls?  How, precisely, does Rawls bring political philosophy back to life?  What are the basic features and elements of Rawlsian justice?  What does the book tell us about its historical context and condition of possibility?

Our seminar will proceed as close readings of whole books, under the assumption that political theory is best digested in non-excerpted form and that a different group of interpretive muscles are flexed when we linger on a work in its (exhaustive) entirety.  After Rawls, we will turn to The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, Anti-Oedipus, The History of Sexuality, Black Marxism, and Gender Trouble.  This course will be especially useful for students preparing for their comprehensive exams in political theory.

 

This seminar is designed primarily for Political Science graduate students preparing a concentration in political theory, but it is also open to students in Philosophy, Anthropology, Sociology, Women’s Studies, and related fields.  This course provides a rigorous introduction to major works of political theory since the 1971 publication of John Rawls’s A Theory of Justice.  We will launch our study with a close reading of this pivotal work in its entirety and pose questions about why the publication of this book has been claimed as a moment of “revival” for political philosophy.  Was philosophical thinking about politics dead or dormant before Rawls?  How, precisely, does Rawls bring political philosophy back to life?  What are the basic features and elements of Rawlsian justice?  What does the book tell us about its historical context and condition of possibility?

Our seminar will proceed as close readings of whole books, under the assumption that political theory is best digested in non-excerpted form and that a different group of interpretive muscles are flexed when we linger on a work in its (exhaustive) entirety.  After Rawls, we will turn to The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere, Anti-Oedipus, The History of Sexuality, Black Marxism, and Gender Trouble.  This course will be especially useful for students preparing for their comprehensive exams in political theory.


PSC 80301 Transcendence and Public Life
Prof. Susan Buck-Morss Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27213]

This seminar will question the modernist premise of immanence as the organizing frame of political life. In our global era, ethical and moral practice may demand more. Political theology meets its challenge in theological politics. Beginning with Theodor W. Adorno¹s lectures on modern moral philosophy (post-Kant), we will consider the continuities of Christian belief in Western history (Kantorowicz), and Karl Marx¹s secularization of the theological goal. Walter Benjamin¹s early writings will provide a bridge to Philo of Alexandria¹s 1st-century allegoresis of Jewish Scripture as Platonic philosophy. We will discover Islam¹s cosmopolitan enhancement of Aristotlelianism and the Jesuit¹s anti-colonial debt to Andalusian Judaism. As contemporary examples of theological politics and/as moral practice, we will consider Mahatma Gandhi, Cornel West, Enrique Dussel, and Waed Hallaq. As hermeneutical strategies against theological politics (Carl Schmitt, Salim Sayyid), we will read the Muslima author Jerusha Tanner Lamptey, the late writing of Walter Benjamin, and Talal Asad on the Islamic state.


PSC 80405 Psychoanalysis and Political Thought
Prof. Jack Jacobs Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [27219]

This seminar will be devoted to exploring and debating the hotly contested relationship(s) between psychoanalytic ideas (and of approaches derived from or engaged in dialogue with psychoanalysis) on the one hand and political theory on the other.  We will focus particular attention this semester on a range of attempts, made over an extended period of time, to link Marxist approaches with psychoanalytic insights, and will attempt to assess the degree to which each of these attempts does – or does not – remain compelling.  Accent will be placed on close reading of classic texts chosen from among the works of such writers as Freud, Jung, Reich, Fromm, Marcuse, Adler, Fanon, Lacan and Althusser.  Students will be encouraged to actively participate, to lead specific class sessions, and to explore their own interests by writing research papers on relevant topics.


PSYC 792000 PSYC 79200 Ecological and Contextual Theories in Psychology
Prof. Susan Saegert Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27632]

This course is the first of two theory courses designed to prepare doctoral students to understand and be able to deploy theoretical positions across the social sciences.   This course focuses on the psychological level of analysis. The theories explored lend themselves to accounts of psychology that can mesh with other levels of analysis.  The course also covers some of the historically important thinkers in environmental and critical social/personality psychology.


PSYC 80103 The Study of Lives
Prof. Jason Van Ora Mondays 2:00-4:00 [27651]

A course in the study of lives invites students to grapple with the uniqueness, challenges, and wisdoms of the individual person.  A number of readings spanning both the social sciences and humanities will introduce students to the following central ideas within this interdisciplinary field of study:
1)     Individual lives must be studied and understood within their larger social, cultural, and political contexts.  The study of one person often includes many, many others.
2)     One can study lives for the purpose of addressing a variety of research questions, illuminating the ways in which findings from large-scale research studies particularize within the life stories of individual persons, embracing individual complexity and distinctiveness, and learning more about the particular time and place within which an individual lived.
3)     The study of lives utilizes a variety of methods, which include interviewing, archival analyses, naturalistic and participant observation, and the narrative analysis of memoirs, biographies, and other life histories.


PSYC 80103/U ED 75200 Structural Violence and Radical Possibility: Designing Critical Educational Studies
Prof. Michelle Fine Mondays 4:15-6:15 [27199]

Drawing on critical theory (critical race, feminist, post-colonial, queer and critical disability studies) and educational justice movements on the ground, this course will be organized to study the history, and document the present enactments of neoliberal "blues" -- the circuits of dispossession through which current educational policy undermines equity and justice, and also chronicle sites of radical possibility (drawing from Jean Anyon) in and around educational praxis in schools and out, community organizing, labor/solidarity justice and mobilizations for broadened access to higher education. Students will conduct archival work on historic sites of educational protest and possibility (e.g. freedom schools; literacy campaigns in Cuba) as well as mini-ethnographies at contemporary sites of "radical possibilities" Students will draw from urban education, psychology, Africana studies, women/gender studies, public health and the law school.


PSYC 80260 Gender and Sexuality Theory
Prof. Deborah Tolman Wednesdays 9:30-11:30 [27678]

In this course, we will read deeply across classic gender and sexuality theories, with an emphasis on feminist and queer theories (Foucault, Butler, Halberstam) as well as an array of theories from psychology and other social sciences that fall outside of critical theory (such as Pfaus, Bancroft and Bailey).  We will also cover some of the most innovative and current theory (including the work of Diamond, C. Fine and McRobbie). Focus will be on developing an understanding of theory and its application. We will interrogate a set of studies (i.e., Fahs, McClelland, Dowsett) in which these theories are utilized.  Readings are both books and articles/book chapters.  Students will be asked to participate in and lead discussions, suggest and present additional readings that enable class discussion of theory, and write a series of short papers.


SOC 84600 Social and Political Subjectivity from Wilhelm Reich to Bernard Stiegler
Prof. Stanley Aronowitz Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [27352]

The problem of social and political subjectivity in contemporary society has occupied increasing attention for the last century. Contrary to expectations the prevailing system of power, technologically advanced capitalism, has weathered constant storms of wars and depressions that many observers and political activists expected would create systemic crisis and social transformation. Rather than ascribing capitalism’s survival to the perfidy of the leadership class,this course explores theories and practices that attempt to describe the contours of subjectivity in the context of social relations. Among the readings: Reich- “What is Class Consciousness”; The Mass Psychology of Fascism Antonio Gramsci- Selections from the Prison Notebooks; Cultural Writings; Henri Lefebvre- Critique of Everyday Life Volume 3 Deleuze and Guattari- Anti-Oedipus Guattari- Chaos Philosophy Maurizio Lazzarato- Signs and Machines Bernard Stiegler- Symbolic Misery.


SOC 85405 Social Change
Prof. Roslyn Bologh Mondays 6:30-8:30 [27350]

The rise of the Occupy Movement and the enormous success of Thomas Picketty’s book, Capital, the cross-disciplinary, international, academic and lay interest and acclaim it has garnered, speak to the significance of political economy. Political economy causes social changes that have major consequences for social life -- including education, urban life, family life, the environment, immigration, ethnic and race relations, labor relations, and gender relations as well as international relations – also for suicide rates, marriage and divorce rates, single parent rates, rates of morbidity and mortality (including longevity) and more. Part of the appeal of Picketty’s book lies in his emphatic rejection of the narrow economic approach to questions of political economy that he encountered in the U.S. and his espousal, in its stead, of a more comprehensive, sociological, cultural and historical perspective – employing sources as unorthodox as Jane Austen’s novels! What are the changes that have occurred in political economy since the 1970s? How should sociologists, and social scientists more broadly, analyze these changes (sometimes conceived as globalization, financial capitalism, monopoly capitalism, neo-liberalism or post-industrial high tech and service economy) and their consequences for social life today and in the coming years? We will examine different analytic perspectives to see which one(s) seem most compelling.


THEA 70600 History of Theatrical Theory
Prof. Peter Eckersall Mondays 4:15-6:15 [27091]

This course will introduce students to theatrical theory as a research discipline and will examine theories that have influenced contemporary theatre and performance studies. We will begin with a general discussion of what constitutes theory and then proceed modularly to examine such key theatrical and performance concepts as representation, mimesis, dramaturgy, and audience response. A modular structure will allow us to follow and create ongoing dialogues about these concepts as they have evolved. The second objective of the course will be met through, again, a modular approach to the presentation and discussion of such influential critical and cultural theories as formalism and structuralism, semiotics, post-structuralism, deconstruction, feminism, and cultural theory, as well as other disciplinary approaches—coming from, for instance, anthropology, sociology, and psychology—that have transformed theatre and performance. In addition to the readings, video documentation of performances is suggested for some of the topics and students are invited to bring their own examples of relevant dramatic texts and theatre and performance works into the discussion.


THEA 85600 Studies in Theatre Aesthetics: Mediatized Performance
Prof. Edward Miller Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [27098]

This course explores theories and practices of mediatized performance by focusing upon the interlinking of media and theatre in a staged event. We examine the work of directors, choreographers, and artists whose work incorporates and makes visible or audible the use of media, such as William Forsythe, Merce Cunningham, Gob Squad, Ivo von Hove, Elevator Repair Service, Builders Association, Robert LePage, and the Wooster Group. Key questions include: How integral and apparent is the use of technology to the composition and the aesthetics of the performance? Does the use of projected imagery or remixed sounds serve to enlarge or contain the dimensions of theatrical space? How do instances of mediatized performance transmit and frame the body and voice of the performer? In order to address these concerns we read key texts in performance and media theory by Steve Dixon, Matthew Causey, Josephine Machon, Rebecca Schneider, Steven Connor, DJ Spooky, Peggy Phelan, Philip Auslander, Paul Sanden, Christof Migone, Jonathan Sterne, Jay Bolter, Eduardo Navas, and Lisa Gitelman. The second half of the course focuses on three distinctive mediatized realms: postwar radio drama (including work of Beckett and Artaud), contemporary dance theatre and its use of videated images, and the current digitization of performing arts archives and its ramifications for research, performance history, and the “repertoire.” Student work for the course includes presenting a session’s reading and leading discussion, an abstract that is designed for submission, and a term paper of 15-20 pages. The final class is structured like a conference in which students summarize their research findings.


THEA 86000 Theatre and Society: Rootless Cosmopolitans: Yiddish Theatre and the Aesthetics of Diaspora
Prof. Debra Caplan Thursdays 2:00-4:00 [27099]

How have the experiences of migration, exile, and dislocation intersected with theatre history, aesthetics, and practice? In this course, we will investigate how theatre is produced and how it functions in diasporic contexts, with a particular focus on the history of the Yiddish stage. This seminar is intended both as a historical survey of Yiddish theatre history and as an introduction to diaspora studies for the theatre historian. Readings in diaspora theory across the disciplines (including anthropology, sociology, history, political science, comparative literature, geography, theatre history, performance studies, and musicology) are paired with plays that exemplify particular diasporic traits, themes, or aesthetic sensibilities, with a special focus on Yiddish theatre as a paradigmatic case study. Topics include diaspora aesthetics, multilingualism, double consciousness, theatre of the subaltern, hybridity, nostalgia, adaptation, and diasporic performance in the digital age and readings include plays by Avrom Goldfaden, Jacob Gordin, Peretz Hirschbein, Y.L. Peretz, Alter Kacyzne, Sh. Ansky, H. Leivick, and Dovid Pinsky. We will consider the international, cross-cultural success of plays like The Dybbuk and The Golem alongside historiographic questions about the location of diasporic performance traditions in theatre history. Requirements: Weekly reading assignments, research proposal, oral presentation, 15-20 page research paper.