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Courses

Core Course

CTCP 71088 Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices
Prof. John Brenkman Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [30090]

**Permission is required to register for the core course. To register, please contact the Coordinator at criticaltheory@gc.cuny.edu. Priority will be given to students enrolled in the Critical Theory Certificate Program. **

Elective Courses

ANTH 80900/CL 80100 Reflections on Psychoanalysis
Prof. Vincent Crapanzano Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [30022]

ANTH 80700/EES 79903/PSYC 80103 The Politics of Public Space
Prof. Setha Low Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [30020]

ART 74000 The Islamic City From the Pre-Modern to the Globalization: Current Debates, Theories and the Art and Architecture of the Cities in the Middle East
Prof. Nebahat Avcioglu Mondays 6:30-8:30 [30041]

ART 76020 Hidden Temporal Structures in European Art and Exhibitions: 1930 to 1970
Prof. Romy Golan Mondays 2:00-4:00 [30031]

ART 86030 Social Matters: Architecture and the Welfare State
Prof. Marta Gutman Mondays 9:30-11:30 [30035]

CLAS 71800 Conceptions of History
Prof. Adam Becker Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [30080]

CL 80100 Television Without Borders: Transnational Perspectives on Prestige Serial Drama
Prof. Giancarlo Lombardi Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [30085]

CL 89200/FREN 87000 History of Literary Theory and Criticism
Prof. Bettina Lerner Thursdays 6:30-8:30 [30087]

CL 80100/HIST 72300/PSC 71901 After Theory
Prof. Richard Wolin Mondays 4:15-6:15 [30088]

CL 80100/ENG 88000 Feminism, Autobiography, Theory: Women Writing
Prof. Nancy Miller Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [30094]

ENGL 73100.The Curriculum of Counterinsurgency: Revolutions, Empires, Universities
Prof. Siraj Ahmed Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [30320]

ENGL 86500 Postcolonial Poetics: Body, Archive, Memory
Prof. Meena Alexander Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [30319]]

ENGL 85400 Decolonizing Thought: On Indigeneity, Race, and Modernity
Prof. Kandice Chuh Mondays 11:45-1:45 [30316]

ENGL 80600 Human Rights in Theory and Practice
Prof. Feisal Mohamed Thursdays 11:45-1:45 [30311]

ENGL 85400 Towards a Negative Aesthetics in U.S. Latina/o Literatures
Prof. Richard Perez Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [30318]

ENGL 84500 Disability Studies and Nineteenth Century Literature
Prof. Talia Schaffer Wednesdays 11:45-1:45 [30304]

ENGL 84200 Romantic Concepts of Nature
Prof. Alexander Schlutz Mondays 2:00-4:00 [30313]

ENGL 85500 Postcolonial African Narrative
Prof. Barbara Webb Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [30314]

ENGL 84200 Romantic Autobiography
Prof. Joshua Wilner Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [30299]

EES 79903/PSYC 80103/U ED 75200 Comparative Participatory Democracy and Social Movements
Prof. Celina Su Thursdays 11:45-1:45 [30652]

FREN 81000 Materiaux/Materialite du genre au Moyen Age
Prof. Francesca Sautman Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [30319]

SPAN 86400 Narrativa mexicana del siglo XX: modernidad, nación y guerra
Prof. Oswaldo Zavala Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [30381]

SPAN 87100 Subjectivity, TV Miniseries, and the 40th Anniversary of the Coup d’état in Chile
Prof. Silvia Dapia Mondays 6:30-8:30 [30378]

SPAN 87300 The Politics of Language & Cultures During the Spanish “Transición”
Prof. José del Valle Fridays 2:00-4:00 [30390]

SPAN 87400 Latin America Critical Theory
Prof. Fernando Degiovanni Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [30380]

HIST 71500 Spaces and Identities in France and the Francophone World since 1750
Prof. David Troyansky Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [30332]

HIST 78400 Knowledge is Power: The State and its Sciences in the Age of Enlightenment
Prof. Barbara Naddeo Mondays 2:00-4:00 [30334]

MUS 83100 Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Music and Mobilities
Prof. Jane Sugarman Wednesdays 10:00-1:00 [30189]

MUS 87000 Seminar in Music History: Critical Approaches to Musicology: Hermeneutics and Reception Theory
Prof. Anne Stone Mondays 2:00-5:00 [30195]

PHIL 77800 Classics in the Philosophy of Art
Prof. Noel Carroll Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [30213]

PHIL 78600 Understanding Locke’s Essay
Prof. Jessica Gordon-Roth Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [30223]

PHIL 76100 Philosophical Method in Late Plato
Prof. Nickolas Pappas Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [30216]

PHIL 77700 Rereading Marx
Prof. Graham Priest Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [30215]

PHIL 77500 Ethics
Prof. Steven Ross Wednesdays 11:45-1:45 [30219]

PHIL 76200 Eudaimonism
Prof. Iakovos Vasiliou Mondays 2:00-4:00 [30211]

PSC 82001 Post-Democracy
Prof. Susan Buck-Morss Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [30246]

PSC 72001 Machiavelli
Prof. Benedetto Fontana Thursdays 6:30-8:30 [30249]

PSC 82001 The Politics of Death and Dying
Prof. Nichole Shippen Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [30242]

PSYC 80103 Study of Lives
Prof. Jason Van Ora, Mondays 4:15-6:15 [30647]

PSYC 80103 Queer Psychology
Prof. Kevin Nadal Wednesdays 9:30-11:30 [30650]

PSYC 80103 Just Places: Experience, Documentation, Analysis
Prof. David Chapin Thursdays 2:00-4:00 [30653]

PSYC 79102 Environmental Social Science II: Ecological and Contextual Conceptions of Psychology
Prof. Susan Saegert Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [30630]

SOC 84700 Marx’s Grundrisse
Prof. Stanley Aronowitz Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [30359]

SOC 74600 Political Economy and Social Life
Prof. Roslyn Bologh Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [30795]

SOC 80000 Feminist Texts and Theories
Prof. Hester Eisenstein Mondays 2:00-4:00 [30735]

SOC 76900 Media and Popular Culture Analysis
Prof. Erica Childs Mondays 2:00-4:00 [30355]

THEA 80300 Seminar in Theatre Theory and Criticism: What About Time? The Provocative Conjunctions of Theatre and Temporality
Prof. Maurya Wickstrom Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [30368]

THEA 81500 Film Theory: French Cinema and French Thought in the Twentieth Century
Prof. David Gerstner Fridays 11:45-3:45 [30370]
 
CTCP 71088 Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices
Prof. John Brenkman Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [30090]

Starting from the tension between Marx and Weber, the seminar will explore debates and developments that inform contemporary theory, focused around salient conflicts in social theory, philosophy, and aesthetics. (1) How do conflicting paradigms of society as system (Luhmann), as norm-governed institutions (Habermas), as symbolic-institutional habitus and practices (Bourdieu), or as actor-networks (Latour) bear on interdisciplinary research? (2) How does the encounter between philosophy and cultural studies illuminate or obscure the political purport of cultural analysis (Žižek, Sloterdijk, Habermas, Laclau, Butler)? (3) How to conceptualize the artwork (or literary text) in its difference from other objects and practices, its immersion in institutions and social networks, its hermeneutical instability and variability, its relation to prevailing forms of “communication” (Heidegger, Deleuze, Luhmann, Harman, and others)?
 
In the course of addressing these three blocs of critical theory, we will reflect on such fundamental concerns as the “linguistic turn” and the “affective turn”; alternative conceptions of “critique” as normative, utopian, or dialectical as well as rejections of critique as a model; the longstanding difference regarding the task of theory to change the world or to interpret it in various ways; and what is meant by “world” in the age of globalization.
 
Texts: Garth and Mills (eds.), From Max Weber; Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, What Is Philosophy?; Martin Heidegger, Poetry, Language, Thought; Pierre Bourdieu and Roger Chartier, The Sociologist and the Historian; Judith Butler, Ernesto Laclau, and Slavoj Žižek, Contingency, Hegemony, Universality; Slavoj Žižek, In Defense of Lost Causes; Peter Sloterdijk, In the World Interior of Capital. Excerpts and essays by Marx, Jürgen Habermas, Niklas Luhmann, Bruno Latour, Seyla Benhabib, Brian Massumi, Graham Harman, and others.


ANTH 80900/CL 80100 Reflections on Psychoanalysis
Prof. Vincent Crapanzano Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [30022]

This seminar attempts to gain a critical perspective on psychoanalysis as both a therapeutic practice and a theory of interpretation that reflects prevailing notions of the psyche through close readings of texts by Freud, Winicott, and Lacan. Emphasis will be placed on the underlying epistemological assumptions of psychoanalytic hermeneutics, on the discursive transactions that it presumes and figures in terms of transference and counter-transference, and on its notions of time, truth, and revelation. Special attention will be given to the rhetoric of the unconscious, to trauma (as a mode of psychic punctuation), and on the application of psychoanalytic interpretation to literary texts, rituals, and other cultural phenomena. Readings will include Freud’s Interpretation of Dreams, several of his case histories, and various metapsychological essays (e.g. “The Unconscious,” Beyond the Pleasure Principle, “The Uncanny,” and Civilization and its Discontents; Winnicott’s Playing and Reality and Holding and Interpretation: A Fragment of Analysis; and selections from Lacan’s Écrits and Seminars (Notably “The Function and Field of Speech and Language in Psychoanalysis,” Four Fundamental Concepts of Psychoanalysis, and The Ethics of Psychoanalysis). As a starting point we will read several chapters of Foucault’s Wrong-Doing/Truth Telling: The Function of Avowal in Justice. 
 
 
ANTH 80700/EES 79903/PSYC 80103 The Politics of Public Space
Prof. Setha Low Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [30020]

This course begins with an exploration of what it means for space to be public particularly in the urban environment.  Course readings cover the economic, social, political and cultural ideas of what public and publicness means and the ways that this “publicness” is worked out spatially.  A variety of public spaces—parks, plazas, libraries, streets, sidewalks, and beaches—where publicness is produced and contested are examined, and students will select public spaces to study as part of the learning process.

This course also reviews the ways in which political expression and negotiation among constituencies occur in the public space. It considers the concepts of the "right to the city" and social justice as political ideals for public space and current trends such as privatization, surveillance, and securitization as expressions of conflict.

The course organization is based on the major concepts and processes evident in public space with a focus on how they have been understood theoretically and ethnographically.  Students will be asked to direct the discussion for the individual weeks and to bring their research questions and findings to class each week for ongoing discussion.


ART 74000 The Islamic City From the Pre-Modern to the Globalization: Current Debates, Theories and the Art and Architecture of the Cities in the Middle East
Prof. Nebahat Avcioglu Mondays 6:30-8:30 [30041]

The concept of the city is as important as it is difficult to define. A rigorous definition of the Islamic city has also proven uneasy to establish among historians and theoreticians,
since it elides any essentialist characterization, even that of the reductive “non-western” city proposed by the Orientalists. Yet, the legacy of the early twentieth century orientalist discourse about the Middle Eastern cities is still around us. From disillusioned architects and urban planners to tourism branding agencies and exhibition trends the concept of “the Islamic City” is mobilized to deal with the anomie caused by industrialization and globalization. This course proposes a critical historical review of the concept of the city pointing to the debates, theories and controversies that have framed and interpret it. We will probe essentialist tendencies and study social processes and cultural forces through art, architecture, biennials, literature and legal documents to understand the city in its own terms. Proceeding in a chronological order, we will discuss early urban developments under Muslim rule, whether in pre-existing cities or newly
established settlements, exploring what cultural, political, social and religious elements shaped them. By focusing on specific city types such as the classical city, traditional city, imperial city, modern city, (post)colonial city and global city, we will examine a variety of interpretive paradigms employed by scholars, artists and architects in order to reify or reject the validity of the category of the Islamic City. Looking at specific sites –from Baghdad, Cairo, Jerusalem, Damascus, to Istanbul, Medina, Tehran and Dubai, among others –we will try to understand the workings of cities and what have come to define their historical and contemporary character and narrative. Structured along these lines, the course will consider relevance of the concept of the Islamic City for the study of cities in the Muslim world today.

 
ART 76020 Hidden Temporal Structures in European Art and Exhibitions: 1930 to 1970
Prof. Romy Golan Mondays 2:00-4:00 [30031]

Part lecture, part seminar, this class will investigate hidden temporal structures in French, Italian, British and German art from 1930 to 1970. Art by its nature escapes linear time. It folds time over on itself, creating and exposing new historical patterns. Art, compounding the distortions of memory, writes alternative histories. The course will analyze the disturbances of Nachleben (afterlife), the palimpsest, the outmoded, the flashback and the eclipse in their charged political and historical contexts.
Works and exhibitions considered will include: Kurt Schwitter’s later Merzbau; 1930s exhibitions from the Pressa exhibition in Dresden to the Mostra della Rivoluzione Fascista in Rome to National Socialist exhibitions in Berlin; museology as a form of postwar reconstruction; image constellations from Aby Warbug’s Mnemosyne to the Dadaistischer Handatlas to André Malraux’s Musée Imaginaire to Gerhard Richter’s Atlas; urban dérives from André Breton’s Nadja to Asger Jorn and Guy Debord’s Mémoires to Bruno Munari and Ugo Mulas’ Campo Urbano; Max Ernst’s collage novels; Edoardo Paolozzi and Richard Hamilton in the Independent Group; the photo-paintings of European Pop; light rooms from the Bauhaus to the Zero Group to Arte Programmata.

 
ART 86030 Social Matters: Architecture and the Welfare State
Prof. Marta Gutman Mondays 9:30-11:30 [30035]

Following World War II, the western democracies embraced bold, wide-ranging programs for reform, broadly defined under the rubric, the “welfare state.” In Europe and the United States, governments made modern architecture and urbanism--the constructed environment--central to the political project of the welfare state (itself closely allied with Cold War liberalism). If improving everyday life and redistributing wealth stood out as goals, at least in Western Europe, so, too did other less exalted ideals in state-sponsored projects, erected at home and abroad. Expect in this seminar to study public housing, new towns, schools, playgrounds, and other sites, where use mattered in the developed and developing world. Special attention will be given to women, families and children, in the main ignored in the studies of this topic, to architecture and social theory, and to the intersection of political power, expertise and the construction of the self.
 
Key texts include Architecture and the Welfare State, edited by Mark Swenarton, Tom Avermaete, and Dirk van den Heuvel, Use Matters: An Alternative History of the Architecture,
and Governing the Soul: The Shaping of the Private Self by Nikolas Rose.


CLAS 71800 Conceptions of History
Prof. Adam Becker Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [30080]

Tradition is a term commonly used in several fields within the social sciences and the humanities, but it appears perhaps most commonly in reference to the "Classical tradition" or to the various "religious traditions." The identification of traditions is an important discursive act in the social world and it helps to constitute the academic disciplines, but it can also contribute to the closing off of certain kinds of analysis, redering what is deemed "tradition" as unchanging or sui generis. In this seminar we will examine a variety of ways of conceiving of tradition among standard works of social sicence, literary criticism, and philosophy. This is not a course on any one specific tradition or traditions. Rather, our goal is to evaluate different approaches to the idea of tradition itself and in doing so address, among other things, institutional continuity, literary reception, and cultural memory. Readings will include Karl Marx, T.S. Eliot, Mikhail Bakhtin, Eric Auerbach, Edward Shils, Eric Hobsbawm, Alisdair MacIntyre, and Talal Asad.


CL 80100 Television Without Borders: Transnational Perspectives on Prestige Serial Drama
Prof. Giancarlo Lombardi Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [30085]
Television has enjoyed a creative resurgence in the US, virtually depleting and replacing the once thriving independent film industry. At the same time, the advent of digital platforms such as Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime has facilitated the local distribution of foreign serial drama, granting access to productions that were once imagined as strictly bound to a national target of viewers. In Europe, the recent merger of BSkyB, Sky Italia, and Sky Deutschland has led to the restructuring of a media conglomerate that promoted the simultaneous airing of prestige European serial drama across several countries, including the US. The launch of Netflix in 50 countries has not only led to increasing worldwide distribution of American serial drama, but also to the company’s growing investment in the creation of local original series, to be distributed simultaneously all over the world.
 
This course proposes a comparative approach to television drama, through the specific study of prestige serial drama, namely TV series usually connoted by high production values, naturalistic performance style, narrative complexity, stylistic integrity, and committed viewer engagement. Our investigation will be guided by the narratological concerns raised by Jason Mittell in Complex Television, and inflected by the application of theoretical tenets until now largely associated with the study of comparative literature. While maintaining its firm footing in the specific critical tools associated to the study of television, this course grafts onto the study of television questions raised in Pascale Casanova’s World Republic of Letters, investigating serial drama in its global positioning and in its nationalistic investments, identifying its national aesthetics and its political dependencies, its loci of assimilation and its forms of rebellion against dominant paradigms dictated by Hollywood. Pierre Bourdieu’s understanding of power and capital in his study of sites of force(s) and struggle(s) in the field of cultural production, Benedict Anderson’s definition of imagined communities, and Arjun Appadurai’s investigation of imagination as social force in identity creation will all contribute to our reading of a diverse group of television series, analyzed through questions of genre, themes, and format. For the purpose of limiting what is already an incredibly vast field of inquiry, comedies will not be taken into consideration.
 
Series discussed in this course will include Generation War (Germany), The Bridge (Sweden-Denmark & US-Mexico), The Tunnel (France-UK), In Treatment (Israel, US, & Italy), Hatufim (Israel), Borgen (Denmark), Les Revenants (France), Ainsi-soient-ils (France), Gomorrah (Italy), Deutschland 83 (Germany-US), Jordskott (Sweden), Top of the Lake (New Zealand), Salamander (Belgium), Cordon (Belgium), Black Mirror (UK), Broadchurch (UK), Mad Men, Damages, House of Cards, Homeland, The Affair, The Good Wife, The Walking Dead, Breaking Bad, The Sopranos, The Americans, True Detective, American Horror Story. Guest lectures by Professors Ying Zhu and Paul Julian Smith will discuss Chinese and Latin-American serial drama.

 
CL 89200/FREN 87000 History of Literary Theory and Criticism
Prof. Bettina Lerner Thursdays 6:30-8:30 [30087]

This course offers students an overview of the development and key elements of literary criticism from the late eighteenth century until the present day. We will first examine Enlightenment and nineteenth-century discourses about literature in the context of the emergence of a semi-autonomous cultural field. As we move forward into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, we will turn our attention to various critical paradigms including psychoanalysis, structuralism, semiotics, deconstruction, feminism, and post-colonialism. We will look at how these various approaches seek to redefine the relationships between aesthetics and politics, authority and authorship, subjectivity and textuality, historicity and materialism, high culture and mass entertainment. Readings will include Kant, Staël, Sainte-Beuve, Eliot, Marx, Nietzsche, Arnold, Freud, Adorno, Benjamin, Barthes, Derrida, Blanchot, Foucault, Kristeva, Cixous, Bourdieu, Rancière, Said, Mbembe, Casanova.

 
CL 80100/HIST 72300/PSC 71901 After Theory
Prof. Richard Wolin Mondays 4:15-6:15 [30088]

"Theory" has become historical. During the 1980s Theory’s cryptic messages and provisos coursed through departments of comparative literature and humanities promising, if always obliquely, a qualitative transformation of our conventional and retrograde intellectual and practical habitudes. Theory traded on the fading aura of 1960s radicalism, implying that, whereas the soixante-huitards ('68ers) had foundered, it would write the next chapter in the Book of Revolution. Its heightened awareness of past failures, nourished by a skepticism vis-à-vis metanarratives, seemingly enhanced its prospects of success.      
But, when all is said and done, how might one, going forward, define "success"? When the entirety of a tradition is presumptively jettisoned or consigned to desuetude, it is difficult to know exactly where to begin – or to re-begin. Derrida implied that once the demons of logocentrism had been vanquished, life and thought would be permanently and positively transformed. However, both he and his acolytes refrained from pointing out that the thinker who had coined the term "logocentrism" was the well nigh unreadable, proto-fascist German Lebensphilosoph Ludwig Klages (cf. Geist als Widersacher der Seele; 3 vols. 1929-32).
In The History of Sexuality, Foucault, mistrusting the allure of collective action, or, in Hannah Arendt's words, "people acting in concert," recommended that we pursue "a different economy of bodies and pleasures," going so far as to invoke - in what can only be described as a prototypical instance of "Orientalism" - the Kama Sutra (sic) by way of illustration. However, in retrospect, this prescription seemed merely to dovetail with the "culture of narcissism" (cf. Christopher Lasch) that succeeded the demise of the contestatory spirit of the 1960s – as such, grist for the mill of an apolitical "lifestyle" or "identity" politics. In other words: an "apolitical politics."
 Circa 1971, Foucault had internalized the deleterious linkage between "knowledge" and "domination" – or, "power-knowledge" – to the point where he was prepared to abandon both "writing" and "discourse" tout court, having concluded that both were merely expressions of hegemony. If we accept the Nietzschean claim that “truth” is little more than an efflux or manifestation of “power” (as Foucault suggests: “truth isn’t a reward for free spirits . . . it is produced by multiple forms of constraint. It induces regular effects of power. Each society has its regime of truth”), and if all norms are “normalizing,” what, then, is the basis of contestation and critique? Has the concept of emancipation remained meaningful, or must it, too, be cynically consigned to the rubbish heap of lost illusions?
 The story of French Theory coincides with the reception of Nietzsche and Heidegger's thought in France during the 1950s and 1960s. Here, Deleuze's 1962 book on Nietzsche as well as Foucault's essay, "Nietzsche, Genealogy, and History" (1971) signify important way stations. Deconstruction, for its part, takes its inspiration from Heidegger's appeal in Being and Time for a "destruction of the history of Western ontology." At the outset, we will focus on pivotal German and French texts in order to secure a solid philosophical grounding in Theory's conceptual intricacies. Thereby, in a post-enlightenment spirit, the obscure shall be rendered clear - or, at least, clearer.
 Marx once said: "We recognize only one science, the science of history." What, then, might it mean to historicize poststructuralism?
Prospective Book/Reading List:
o   Nietzsche, "On Truth and Lies in an Extra-Moral Sense"
o   Nietzsche, Genealogy of Morals
o   Heidegger, "Letter on Humanism"
o   Heidegger, Being and Time (selections)
o   Derrida, "Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences"
o   Derrida, "Signature, Event, Context"
o   Foucault, Discipline and Punish
o   Foucault, History of Sexuality
o   Deleuze, What is Philosophy?
o   Cusset, French Theory
o   Historicizing Postmodernism
o   Habermas, Philosophical Discourse of Modernity


CL 80100/ENG 88000 Feminism, Autobiography, Theory: Women Writing
Prof. Nancy Miller Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [30094]

Feminist theorizing has long been entangled with autobiographical practices. In this seminar, we will explore texts from different literary genres that all deploy what we might call a “feminist I.” Memoir, testimony, poetry, essay, or fiction, in each instance the “I” bears witness to circumstances and desires that are not simply singular, but also transpersonal and collective. Through what literary strategies do these writers make connections between “I” and “we,” story and life, aesthetics and politics?
 
Readings include: Adichie, Beauvoir, Bechdel, Cixous, Dangarembga, Delbo, Feinberg, Gay, Hartman, Kristeva, Lorde, Menchu, Rankine, Rich, Satrapi, and, as always, Woolf.
 
Work for the course: weekly written responses, one in-class presentation, final paper.

 
ENGL 73100.The Curriculum of Counterinsurgency: Revolutions, Empires, Universities.
Prof. Siraj Ahmed Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [30320]

Students will be asked to post one question each week and to write a final paper. In order to place recent debates about ‘the crisis of the humanities’ and ‘the university in ruins’ into a broader historical and geopolitical perspective, this course will study the Enlightenment origins and colonial development of both institutions. It will focus on four interrelated topics:
(1) The revolutions of the long eighteenth century (English, American, French, and Haitian) and, more specifically, the political and intellectual legacies—counter-revolutionary as well as revolutionary—we have inherited from them. We will play particular attention to the distinction between constituent and constituted power—the fundamental conflict at the heart of every modern revolution—that was first articulated by the Abbé Sieyès in 1789 but would become seminal for twentieth-century critical thought. Possible excerpts from Arendt, On Revolution; James, The Black Jacobins; Negri, Insurgencies: Constituent Power and the Modern State; Badiou, ‘What is a Thermidorean?’ in Metapolitics; Agamben, ‘Potentiality and Law’ in Homo Sacer; Hardt and Negri, ‘Potentialities of a Constituent Power’ in Labor of Dionysus and ‘Constituting the Common’ in Declaration.
 
(2) The relationship of these revolutions to the Enlightenment models of education, particularly literary education,that would shape the modern university. We will study, at varying levels of depth, the bourgeois public sphere and the new practice of criticism that was designed to regulate it, as well as the intertwined development of biopolitics and the human sciences. Possible excerpts from Habermas, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere; Graff, Professing Literature: An Institutional History; Derrida, The Eyes of the University and ‘The University without Condition’; Foucault, “Society Must Be Defended”; Rancière, The Ignorant Schoolmaster.
 
(3) The imperial dissemination of Enlightenment by means of colonial education. Even the most honored principles of modern politics and knowledge take on a different appearance in the colonies. Here we will study the work of Subaltern Studies (and like-minded) scholars. Possible excerpts from Guha, Dominance without Hegemony; Chatterjee, Lineages of Political Society and The Politics of the Governed; Kaviraj, The Imaginary Institution of India and The Invention of Private Life; Scott, Conscripts of Modernity: The Tragedy of Colonial Enlightenment; Seth, Subject Lessons.
(4) The place of postcolonial theory—and perhaps of the contemporary humanities more broadly—within the historical trajectory our class will have mapped to this point. Where do they unwittingly extend their own colonial genealogy and where do they instead interrupt it in nuanced ways? Until we understand the university’s global longue durée, we may not be in position even to evaluate the academic humanities today. Possible excerpts from Gramsci, The Southern Question; Fanon, ‘On National Culture’; Cabral, ‘The Weapon of Theory’; Freire, The Pedagogy of the Oppressed; Said, Humanism and Democratic Criticism; Spivak, ‘What’s Left of Theory?.’


ENGL 86500 Postcolonial Poetics: Body, Archive, Memory
Prof. Meena Alexander Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [30319]

Using a range of texts -- poetry, fiction, theory -- we will explore questions of embodiment, affect, gender, sexuality and the search for voice in the face of racial violence, spatial dislocation and  temporal ruptures. How might we connect archival knowledge in its sometimes ruined materiality with the intensely personal task of textual self-construction? We will think about cultural memory and the archive it generates; the function of art in a time of difficulty; acts of autobiographical meaning –making ; radical untranslatability. We will trace South-South connections (Wright, Manto); sexuality, trauma and race in contemporary American women poets (Cha, Rankine); exile, diaspora, fractured identities (Naipaul, Rushdie); Indian Ocean cosmopolitanisms (Gandhi, Ghosh, Ananda Devi). We will read Fanon’s `Colonial Wars and Mental Disorders’, Djebar’s `Forbidden Gaze, Severed Sound’ and Mahasveta Devi’s short stories as well as selections from Dalit writers. We will have readings from theorists such as Appadurai, Debord, Derrida, Glissant, Guha, Lowe, Merleau-Ponty, Moten, Spivak, Stoler and others. This course will be run as a seminar with weekly readings and student presentations and a final research paper. Books for purchase will be on order at Book Culture, 536 W 112 St (between Broadway and Amsterdam): Theresa Cha,  Dictee;  Mahasveta Devi, Imaginary Maps; Assia Djebar, Women of Algiers in Their Apartment; Frantz Fanon, Wretched of the Earth; Amitav Ghosh, Antique Land; V.S.Naipaul, Enigma of Arrival; Claudia Rankine, Citizen;  Salman Rushdie, Satanic Verses.  Other materials will be uploaded into the course dropbox.

 
ENGL 85400 Decolonizing Thought: On Indigeneity, Race, and Modernity
Prof. Kandice Chuh Mondays 11:45-1:45 [30316]

This seminar takes as its point of departure the critiques and theorizations of the ongoingness of coloniality as another, more appropriate name for modernity.  How do such insights transform the understanding and deployment of such concepts key to cultural studies as nation, race, sexuality, gender, sovereignty, postcoloniality, and justice?  What are the possibilities for and obstacles to advancing decolonial thinking through aesthetic craft and pedagogic/intellectual/curricular practice?  What are the stakes in such projects?  Relying especially on the critical/creative work of Native American, American Indian, and First Nations discourses, we will devote the semester to becoming critically conversant with, and/or deepening our engagements with, decolonization as a theoretical, political, aesthetic, and economic construct and condition.  Among others, students should expect to encounter work by William Apess, Joanne Barker, Jodi Byrd, Glen Coulthard, Louise Erdrich, Mishuana Goeman, Alyosha Goldstein, J. Kehaulani Kauanui, Lisa Lowe, Walter Mignolo, Mark Rifkin, Leslie Marmon Silko, Audra Simpson, Gerald Vizenor, Robert Warrior, Sarah Winnemucca, and Sylvia Wynter. 
Two shorter writings and a longer project constitute the formal requirements of the course for students enrolled for 4 credits; students enrolled for 2 credits would submit only the two shorter writings to meet these requirements.  Everyone is expected to participate fully in the life of what will be a discussion-driven class.

 
ENGL 80600 Human Rights in Theory and Practice
Prof. Feisal Mohamed Thursdays 11:45-1:45 [30311]

Most of us would accept that human rights exist, but what is their foundation? On what grounds to we hold these rights? Does they still exist if we have no forum in which to seek remedy for their violation?

This course will proceed from philosophical debates on the nature of rights, pausing especially on Marxian critiques of “the rights of man” and charges of inherent Western bias. We will also look at the historical development of the concept of human rights, from Locke, to Mill, to Nuremberg, to the recent development of an individual petition process for violations of social and economic rights. The “practice” in the course title signals the ways in which we will seek to inform our critical practices, studying relevant literary criticism, and also to wonder how the theoretical questions we engage should impact real-world scenarios. Toward the latter end, we will seek to draw on the resources of the city, as site of the UN headquarters and major hub of NGO activity.

Assignments will include a seminar presentation and research paper of 16 pages. Students will have the option of coordinating this research with a human-rights organization.

Preliminary list of readings: Judith Butler and Domna Stanton, “The Humanities in Human Rights, special issue of PMLA (2006); Eleni Coundouriotis, The People’s Right to the Novel (2014); Coundouriotis and Lauren M.E. Goodlad, “Comparative Human Rights: Literature, Art, Politics,” special issue of Journal of Human Rights (2010); Lynn Hunt, Inventing Human Rights: A History (2008); Samuel Moyn, The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History (2012) and Christian Human Rights (2015); Thomas Pogge, Worlds Poverty and Human Rights (2008); Kay Schaffer and Sidonie Smith, Human Rights and Narrated Lives (2004); Joseph R. Slaughter, Human Rights, Inc. (2007); Daniel J. Whelan, Indivisible Human Rights: A History (2010).



ENGL 85400 Towards a Negative Aesthetics in U.S. Latina/o Literatures
Prof. Richard Perez Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [30318]

For the last two centuries, Latino/as in the U.S. have forged a literary tradition predicated on complex rearticulations of American sensibilities through generative and revisionary forms of negativity. In this course we will consider, using Adorno as a theoretical springboard, how Latino/a writers employ the negative to split and recombine languages, creolize racial identities, reimagine borders, and queer exile; and in so doing alter our notion of what constitutes aesthetic production, experience, and judgment. This literary sensibility runs counter, for instance, to Whitmanian flourishes of optimism or the ideological insistence on positivity that often veils the violence of colonial and market practices. Thus, we will examine how the formation of U.S. Latino/a literary aesthetics complicates what Marcuse calls given realities through a restless and critical imaginary attuned to the potential of the negative, a potential found, paradoxically, in privation, rage, failure, conflict, and confusion. In addition, we will explore the ways in which this negative potential aspires towards something revolutionary and utopic calling for sentient shifts both in our aesthetics and in our politics. 
Primary texts include: Down These Mean Streets by Piri Thomas; The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz; The Second Death of Unica Aveyano by Ernesto Mestre-Reed; Across a Hundred Mountains by Reyna Grande; and Try to Remember by Iris Gomez.  
Theoretical works will include selected readings from Theodor Adorno, Herbert Marcuse, Emmanuel Levinas, Frantz Fanon, Giles Deleuze, Michael Taussig, Juan Flores, Judith Butler, Gloria Anzaldua, Rey Chow, Fred Moten, Silvio Torres-Saillant, Chela Sandoval, Jose David Saldivar, Shoshana Felman, Lisa Sanchez Gonzalez, Doris Sommer, Lyn Di Iorio Sandin, Jose Esteban Munoz, Mary Pat Brady, Laura Lomas, and Sianne Ngai.

 
ENGL 84500 Disability Studies and Nineteenth Century Literature
Prof. Talia Schaffer Wednesdays 11:45-1:45 [30304]

This course investigates the burgeoning field of disability theory, with special attention to the Victorian period as an era with interestingly different ideas about minds, social relations, and bodies – formulations that may help us to fresh understandings of disability today. What did disability mean in a period with profoundly other ideas about cognition, physical capacity, and social relations? We will start with some of the formative disability studies theoretical and critical texts, by Lennard Davis, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, Alison Kafer, Tobin Siebers, Robert McRuer, Martha Stoddard Holmes, and Ato Quayson, looking at the invention of the normate, the social model versus the medical model, the way disability challenges normative ideas of identity, and the way disability studies intersects with both queer theory and feminism. The course will focus on recent disability studies work in particularly interesting fields: neurodiversity (particularly around autism), sensory issues (including blindness and Deaf culture), and social conditions (including the built environment and the gaze). 
These case studies will be paired with major nineteenth-century texts in which disabled subjects have crucial roles. Choices may include novels by Charlotte Bronte: Jane Eyre (paired with the recent collection, The Madwoman and the Blindman) and Villette; novels by Charlotte Yonge, The Heir of Redclyffe, and The Clever Woman of the Family; novels by Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady and The Wings of the Dove; novels by Charles Dickens, Bleak House and Our Mutual Friend; and novels by George Eliot, The Mill on the Floss and Daniel Deronda. We may also (or instead) examine two noncanonical but enduringly popular and influential texts, John Halifax Gentleman, or The History of Sir Richard Calmady. These novels will be chosen both to give a sense of the alterity of Victorian conceptualizations of disability and the range of thought within each author's oeuvre, as idealistic earlier works that focus on ecstatic nursing relations often give way to later novels that explore the costliness of caregiving and the stress of chronic conditions.
Finally, this course will ask a major question: can the philosophy of ethics of care be employed as a literary-critical methodology? We will be reading care ethicists including Nel Noddings, Eva Feder Kittay, and Virginia Held. We will ask what care means, what the responsibilities of the carer and cared-for might be respectively, how a care community (or doulia) can be formed, and how care leads us to think differently about gender and social roles. Care is performative (one need not feel or know anything to do it) and in this way it might provide an interesting alternative to sympathy as a motive for social relations. Care is also generic (one can care regardless of one's identity), so that carers can include neighbors, retired military men, cousins, toddlers – a way of regarding social relations and characters that radically reassess their values. How, we will ask, might we read Victorian fictional communities differently if we read them from a standpoint of care relations?


ENGL 84200 Romantic Concepts of Nature
Prof. Alexander Schlutz Mondays 2:00-4:00 [30313]

Since the rise of ecocriticism and green Romanticism it has become commonplace to present Romantic writers as anticipating contemporary environmentalist concerns and to (re)mobilize for contemporary ecological debates the Romantic critique of nascent processes of industrialization and a Cartesian, mechanical, view of the natural world. At the same time, ecologists and environmental writers perceive the “romanticization” of nature – the projection of imaginary, aesthetic and cultural constructs onto a material world fundamentally alien to them – as one of the main obstacles to a fruitful understanding of our relationship to the environment. Hence, in the contemporary discussion, one can see the Romantics both being lauded for writing against the objectification of nature, and being critiqued for neglecting the difference between the products of the writer’s consciousness and affect, and the material Other he or she confronts. To find answers to such conflicting assessments, we will interrogate the concepts of nature of several poets and philosophers in the Romantic period in England and Germany. We will examine central philosophical texts of Spinoza and Kant and discuss the poetry and philosophical positions of William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Clare, and Friedrich von Hardenberg (Novalis). One of our goals will be to examine the answers these Romantic writers give to questions about the place of human beings in the natural world and the relationship of mind and matter, central philosophical questions they indeed share with contemporary environmentalist thinkers.
 

ENGL 85500 Postcolonial African Narrative
Prof. Barbara Webb Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [30314]
This course is a study of narratives by contemporary African writers from the 1980s to the present.  In his recent book, Globalectics: Theory and Politics of Knowing (2012), the postcolonial writer, cultural critic and activist, Ngugi wa Thiong’o calls for “the liberation of literature from the straitjackets of nationalism” and defines the concept of globalectics as “a way to thinking and relating to the world…in the era of globalism and globalization” that recognizes multiple centers of knowledge production and multiple forms of modernity.  We will begin by examining how writers such as Nuruddin Farah and Ben Okri foreshadow the shift in perspectives of a younger generation of writers who came of age in the late 20th century.  We will discuss how these younger writers transform colonial and postcolonial discourse about nationalism and cultural identities, experiment with formal techniques, and maintain a strong critique of ethnic and class conflict, gender and sexual politics, and human rights abuses. We will exam how they negotiate the complex and often treacherous spaces of economic and cultural globalization, migration and transculturation. Our readings will include novels, essays, and autobiographical writings. In addition we will read selections by cultural and literary critics and theorists, such as Arjun Appadurai, Frantz Fanon, Simon Gikandi, Achille Mbembe, and Obioma Nnaemeka among others. Comparative and cross-disciplinary perspectives are welcome. Our primary texts will include:  Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, Globalectics, Binyavanga Wainaina, One Day I will Write About This Place: A Memoir, Nuruddin Farah, Maps, Yvonne Vera, The Stone Virgins, Ben Okri, The Famished Road, Helon Habila, Oil on Water, Zoe Wicomb, David’s Story,  Phaswane Mpe, Welcome to Our Hillbrow, Chimamanda Adichie, Purple Hibiscus, and Chris Abani, GraceLand
 
Requirements:  Oral presentations and a research paper (15-20 pages). This course will be conducted as a seminar with class discussions of assigned readings and oral presentations each week. 


ENGL 84200 Romantic Autobiography
Prof. Joshua Wilner Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [30299]
As The Prelude was first approaching completion, Wordsworth wrote in a letter to a friend: “[It is] a thing unprecedented in literary history that a man should talk so much about himself…If, when the work is finished, it appears to the judicious to have redundancies, they shall be lopped off, if possible; but this is very difficult to do...The fault lies too deep and is in the first conception.”
Whether or not Wordsworth was right in judging his undertaking unprecedented, his identification of a fault embedded in its conception speaks to what is both generative and unsettling in the gesture by which autobiography, and Romantic autobiography in particular, puts the writing subject in a position of self-authorization. In this course we will be exploring the varied ways in which this founding tension plays out in a range of Romantic autobiographical writings, including Rousseau’s Confessions, Wordsworth’s Prelude, Dorothy Wordsworth’s Grasmere Journal, Keats’s “Fall of Hyperion,” Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (particularly the “Author’s Introduction”), and De Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium Eater. Critical readings in de Man, Johnson and others.


EES 79903/PSYC 80103/U ED 75200 Comparative Participatory Democracy and Social Movements
Prof. Celina Su Thursdays 11:45-1:45 [30652]
This seminar takes a look at what ordinary citizens do to shape public programs and engage in politics— in ways other than voting. We explore the notion that popular participation can make democratic governance more legitimate, fair, and effective. Is participatory democracy— alternatively called bottom-up participation, maximal democracy, or direct democracy— really better? Specifically, we will examine forms and functions of civil society from a comparative perspective by looking at specific examples of (1) participatory institutions (neighborhood councils, urban budgeting, school governance, etc.), (2) participation in non-governmental organizations and development projects, and (3) social movements around the world (landless people’s movements, transnational networks, mothers of political dissidents who have “disappeared,” AIDS protest groups, etc.). Sometimes, these three categories blur into one another. We will mostly focus on case studies in “Global South” middle-income countries like Brazil, Argentina, India, China, and South Africa. How much should ordinary citizens participate in policymaking, and how? Under what circumstances? What sorts of policies do we, should we get as a result? When do stakeholders forward a social justice agenda, and do they end up reifying a neoliberal logic, or abiding by the very criteria they wished to resist in the first place? What does the larger ecosystem of citizen input look like, and what can it look like.


FREN 81000 Materiaux/Materialite du genre au Moyen Age
Prof. Francesca Sautman Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [30319]
L La construction du genre [gender]—la mise en place de l’ordre sexe/genre—ne s’effectue pas dans un texte médiéval par le seul moyen de déclarations sur le sujet, ni même par les actions des protagonistes dans un récit. Objets et substances participent dynamiquement à cette construction et constituent en quelque sorte les matériaux du genre, ou sa base matérielle—sa matérialité. La peau, le parchemin, le sang, les larmes; les armes et les outils ; les objets domestiques, y compris les ustensiles de cuisine ; les textiles et les techniques qui  les produisent, d’autres objets encore sont autant de supports à la fabrication du genre et à son expression textuelle. En combinant les enseignements des études du genre et la théorisation de la culture matérielle et de la circulation des biens de consommation—en particulier, le concept que tout objet, et même tout matériau, a une/son histoire-- le cours envisage les lieux textuels ou genre et matérialité se rejoignent. Nos textes du Moyen Age comprennent des textes canoniques et d’autres moins : plusieurs lais de Marie de France, Perceval (le Conte du Graal)  de Chrétien de Troyes, les textes composant la légende de Tristan et Yseut (il n’en existe aucun texte unique complet), quelques fabliaux et contes, les Jeux à vendre de Christine de Pizan et la tradition des Adevineaux amoureux, des textes de Villon, puis de Coquillart et Molinet pour les rhétoriqueurs... Les approches critiques réunissent, entre autres, les travaux de Judith Butler, E. Jane Burns, Peggy McCracken, Karma Lochrie, avec ceux d’Arjun Appadurai et Igor Kopytoff. Le cours est donné en français mais la plupart des lectures critiques sont en anglais.
[Course is given in French but students in Programs other than French are absolutely welcome : as long as they can follow discussions in class in French, they can participate, present orally, and do all written work in English. Most critical and theoretical works assigned are in English.]a construction du genre [gender]—la mise en place de l’ordre sexe/genre—ne s’effectue pas dans un texte médiéval par le seul moyen de déclarations sur le sujet, ni même par les actions des protagonistes dans un récit. Objets et substances participent dynamiquement à cette construction et constituent en quelque sorte les matériaux du genre, ou sa base matérielle—sa matérialité. La peau, le parchemin, le sang, les larmes; les armes et les outils ; les objets domestiques, y compris les ustensiles de cuisine ; les textiles et les techniques qui  les produisent, d’autres objets encore sont autant de supports à la fabrication du genre et à son expression textuelle. En combinant les enseignements des études du genre et la théorisation de la culture matérielle et de la circulation des biens de consommation—en particulier, le concept que tout objet, et même tout matériau, a une/son histoire-- le cours envisage les lieux textuels ou genre et matérialité se rejoignent. Nos textes du Moyen Age comprennent des textes canoniques et d’autres moins : plusieurs lais de Marie de France, Perceval (le Conte du Graal)  de Chrétien de Troyes, les textes composant la légende de Tristan et Yseut (il n’en existe aucun texte unique complet), quelques fabliaux et contes, les Jeux à vendre de Christine de Pizan et la tradition des Adevineaux amoureux, des textes de Villon, puis de Coquillart et Molinet pour les rhétoriqueurs... Les approches critiques réunissent, entre autres, les travaux de Judith Butler, E. Jane Burns, Peggy McCracken, Karma Lochrie, avec ceux d’Arjun Appadurai et Igor Kopytoff. Le cours est donné en français mais la plupart des lectures critiques sont en anglais.
[Course is given in French but students in Programs other than French are absolutely welcome : as long as they can follow discussions in class in French, they can participate, present orally, and do all written work in English. Most critical and theoretical works assigned are in English.]


SPAN 86400 Narrativa mexicana del siglo XX: modernidad, nación y guerra
Prof. Oswaldo Zavala Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [30381]
 En este seminario se estudiarán textos fundacionales de la modernidad literaria mexicana en el siglo XX. Se pensará la modernidad literaria en tanto discurso de conocimiento en tensión con formaciones de estado y nación (Foucault), como efecto de relaciones de poder, hegemonía y capital simbólico en el campo literario (Bourdieu) y como intervención intelectual contrahegemónica (Rancière, Badiou, Žižek). Se analizará también la relación histórica entre el Estado y la tradición literaria como una dialéctica de mediación y resistencia. Finalmente, se cuestionará la función política de las representaciones literarias y su impacto general en los campos de producción cultural. Se incluirán, entre otras, lecturas de Mariano Azuela, Martín Luis Guzmán, Nelly Campobello, Juan Rulfo, Carlos Fuentes, José Revueltas, Jorge Ibargüengoitia, José Agustín, Elena Poniatowska, Daniel Sada, Roberto Bolaño y Juan Villoro.  El curso se impartirá en español.

 
SPAN 87100  Subjectivity, TV Miniseries, and the 40th Anniversary of the Coup d’état in Chile
Prof. Silvia Dapia Mondays 6:30-8:30 [30378]

 During the commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the coup d’état in Chile in September 2013, television played a crucial role. A remarkable plethora of programs emerged ranging from documentaries series such as “Chile, las imágenes perdidas” (Chile’s Forbidden Images), which featured never-before-seen footage of dozens of episodes of repression during the years of dictatorship, to docudramas such as “Ecos del desierto”(Echoes of the Desert), the first major commercial TV series to deal with the slaughter of the “Caravan of Death” in a fictional way and thus offering a glimpse into the military world, which, to my knowledge, has not been explored before. This new tradition of successful TV programs dealing with Pinochet’s dictatorship and thus consciously seeking to contribute to collective memory was inaugurated by “Los 80” (The Eighties). It was produced by Andrés Wood and ran over seven seasons (from 2008 to 2014). This new television trend was continued by “Los Archivos del Cardenal” (The Cardinal’s Files), which ran over two seasons (2011; 2014) and was based on cases that were represented by the Vicaría de la Solidaridad, Chile’s most active human rights organization during the 1970s and 1980s.  This course explores the notion(s) of subjectivity underlying two of these television series, “Ecos del desierto” and the first twelve-episode season of “Los Archivos del Cardenal.”  Some of the questions that we intend to discuss are as follows: How do these TV series portray one’s sense of subjectivity when confronted with terror, oppression, and torture? If, according to some philosophers and theorists subjectivity implies a process of enslavement of our fluid selves, how do we distinguish between the enslavement allegedly in-built in the process of becoming a subject and the enslavement inherent in a subjectivity paralyzed by terror and cruelty? What elements of subjectivity are the targets of oppression?  How does human rights talk become constitutive of subjective positions? Why can certain subjectivities so enthusiastically embrace and act for repressive regimes? How can one create new, corporeal, gendered and oppositional subjectivities that challenge hegemonic forms of subjectivity? Do our attempts to forge new subjectivities necessarily occur through the very ideological framework that we choose to challenge?  Among the theorists of subjectivity that we shall engage with to frame our discussions are Alain Badiou, Judith Butler, Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe, León Rozitchner, and Slavoj Žižek. This course will be taught in Spanish.
 
 
SPAN 87300 The Politics of Language & Cultures During the Spanish “Transición”
Prof. José del Valle Fridays 2:00-4:00 [30390]
 En el otoño de 2014, saltaba a los medios españoles la noticia de que la casa editorial española Planeta había presionado al ensayista Gregorio Morán para que eliminara un capítulo de diez páginas de un manuscrito de más de ochocientas por el cual la editorial le había entregado ya un adelanto. Morán se negó y el libro, íntegro, vio finalmente la luz en Akal, bajo el título El cura y los mandarines. Historia no oficial del Bosque de los Letrados. Cultura y política en España, 1962-1996. El capítulo dichoso contenía una severa crítica a figuras centrales en la gestión de la Real Academia Española durante dicho periodo. Planeta – se decía – temía que la RAE, en venganza, retirara su histórico acuerdo con la editorial, privándola así de los pingües beneficios de la venta de los textos normativos del idioma.
Este episodio evoca varios de los procesos que se abordarán en este seminario. Por un lado, el percance se produce en un contexto marcado por la alteración del mapa político español desde el 15 de Mayo de 2011, cuando multitudes ciudadanas ocuparon las principales plazas del país. Se daba inicio a un nuevo ciclo de acontecimientos en el cual la politización ciudadana, la emergencia de nuevos movimientos sociales y de un nuevo partido político, Podemos, así como la renovada pulsión independentista de un amplio sector del nacionalismo catalán trasformaban profundamente el vocabulario político de las tres últimas décadas de cultura democrática y los valores que se le asociaban. Por otro lado, en dicha escena se dan cita las políticas de la lengua que representa la RAE, los compromisos del entramado editorial español y la mercantilización de la cultura desde múltiples espacios sociales. En tal espacio, sintagmas tales como “derecho a decidir”, “régimen del 78” o “Cultura de la Transición” se incorporan al discurso de reflexión crítica sobre el pasado reciente del país y cuestionan con particular efecto los consensos que en materia política, económica y cultural han venido sirviendo como base de un (siempre disputado) imaginario nacional.
El seminario examinará los arreglos lingüísticos y culturales que caracterizaron el dispositivo-periodo  denominado "La Transición" y el desarrollo de los cuestionamientos actuales de tales arreglos. Para ello trabajaremos desde varios archivos diferentes. Uno de tipo histórico y arqueológico, a través del cual analizaremos los procesos de acuñación lingüística sucedidos tras la muerte de Franco conducentes a la fundación de las que llamaremos "lenguas del consenso democrático" y al borrado cultural de los distintos estadios intermedios de dicha fundación y de las muchas voces ciudadanas que se les opusieron. Otro de tipo contemporáneo, donde atenderemos a los cambios semánticos que, a partir de la crisis de 2008, se han producido en los marcos políticos hegemónicos heredados de los años setenta. Finalmente, atenderemos al archivo de los discursos metalingüísticos generados en torno al dispositivo institucional de las lenguas (academias, oficinas de normalización lingüística, congresos) como zona en la que explorar modelos concretos (y, con frecuencia, enfrentados) de comunidad y democracia a lo largo del periodo estudiado.
A partir de las aportaciones de la historia conceptual, la socio-lingüística, la glotopolítica, la teoría estética y los estudios culturales, y mediante la lectura de teóricos como, por un lado, Laclau, Mouffe, Rancière, Klemperer, Bourdieu, Koselleck o Benjamin y, por otro, Talbot Taylor, John Joseph, Tony Crowley, Deborah Cameron o Kathryn Woolard, en este seminario se discutirán las articulaciones entre política, historia y lenguaje; entre sujetos colectivos y vocabularios comunes; entre instituciones, memoria y discurso; o entre cambio semántico y temporalidad. Para ello utilizaremos toda suerte de materiales, desde el Boletín Oficial del Estado y actas de congresos de la lengua hasta las páginas de contactos de una revista underground, pasando por novelas, documentales, nuevas tecnologías, graffiti, cartelería política, películas, artículos de periódicos, diccionarios y gramáticas, manifestaciones, monumentos memoriales y ceremonias de abdicación. El curso se impartirá en español.
 
 
SPAN 87400 Latin America Critical Theory
Prof. Fernando Degiovanni Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [30380]
This seminar will discuss groundbreaking texts produced by Latin American cultural analysts in the last thirty years. In what will be an inquiry into the politics of academic knowledge in the global theoretical marketplace, we will map the genealogical lines and epistemological crossroads that played a crucial role in the emergence of a number of scholarly discourses about Latin America—notions of modernity, colonialism, globalization, and the popular will be pivotal in this course. We will also examine issues and disputes that helped unleash disciplinary shifts vis-à-vis other theoretical and critical paradigms produced in the U.S. and Europe.  The reading list will include texts by Ángel Rama, Antonio Cornejo Polar, Julio Ramos, Néstor García Canclini, Walter Mignolo, Beatriz Sarlo, Román de la Campa, John Beverley, and Josefina Ludmer. This course will be taught in Spanish.


HIST 71500 Spaces and Identities in France and the Francophone World since 1750 Prof. David Troyansky Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [30332]
 A well-known French slogan refers to France as “one and indivisible.”  However, historians know well the various ways in which France has been quite divisible.  We will explore those ways by looking particularly at the theme of spaces and identities.  We will pay attention to the history of the French landscape, the variety of divisions that are associated with the scholarship on history and memory, ideas of neighborhood in Paris in the eighteenth century, provincial cities and their surroundings in the nineteenth, and a variety of locations and “communities” in France and the Francophone world in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  The first two thirds of the course will involve common and collective readings in the scholarly literature; the last third will involve student research and presentations on particular spaces and identities.


HIST 78400 Knowledge is Power: The State and its Sciences in the Age of Enlightenment
Prof. Barbara Naddeo Mondays 2:00-4:00 [30334]
If age-old, the well-known aphorism "knowledge is power" was a watchword of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, an age in European history which has traditionally been hailed for its development and codification of the methods and disciplines of the modern sciences. If usually studied as the product of the culture and sociability of the age, the emergence of the modern sciences in Europe was also inextricably tied to the new political culture of the territorial state, which itself sought to sponsor, cultivate and harness the findings of the sciences to its own political ends. As a result, the age of the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment was perhaps the first age of "big science," big-picture theories and large-scale projects which sought to transform the terrain and peoples of Europe's territorial states and their empires. At the same time, "big science" equally transformed the political culture of the state, the jurisdiction of its administration, and, no less, the rights and duties of its citizens. This dualistic trend is perhaps best illustrated by the advent of the human sciences, which more than a set of discourses was also tied to the new institutional culture and political practices of the emergent nation-state in Europe. What were the political ramifications of "big sciences" for the state, its subjects and citizens in the age of Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment? This class will provide the answer to that enduring question with its case studies of the major figures and projects of the new human sciences at the cusp of modernity.


MUS 83100 Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Music and Mobilities
Prof. Jane Sugarman Wednesdays 10:00-1:00 [30189]
In recent years the notion of "Mobilities" has been advanced as a new scholarly paradigm:  one that both integrates and challenges earlier emphases on issues such as migration, diaspora, transnationalism, border studies, globalization, and "global flows."  In this course we will investigate recent literature on "Mobilities" in the context of older and recent writings that target specific aspects of movement or stasis.  Our main concern will be the relationship of music to movements of people—migrants and transmigrants, refugees, NGO workers, tourists, business personnel, military troops—as they interact with institutions and infrastructures that facilitate or hinder their movement.  But we may also consider other domains of mobility such as the global circulation of media products, musical practices, and music technologies; or the role that music plays in social mobility or political mobilization.  The course will be structured as a workshop, in which student (and instructor) interest will shape the topics considered and literature consulted.  Permission of instructor required.
 
 
MUS 87000 Seminar in Music History: Critical Approaches to Musicology: Hermeneutics and Reception Theory
Prof. Anne Stone Mondays 2:00-5:00 [30195]
Hermeneutics, briefly, is the study of the conditions under which interpretation can take place, especially across a temporal span between artwork and receiver; reception theory focuses on how the reader or audience shapes the meaning of a work. These theories, which by now form part of the “history” of literary theory, have informed critical theory of the last half-century, and they give rise to a cluster of questions about how we understand music: does the musical work have a fixed meaning that we must uncover? Does a piece of music have as many meanings as it has listeners, and are all hearings equally valid? How do these philosophical questions impinge upon what we do as scholars? In this seminar we will read, and read about, some central texts in these closely-related critical disciplines, and examine ways musicologists have sought to incorporate them into recent scholarship. We will devote roughly equal time to considering theory and methodological questions on the one hand, and pieces of music from a wide span of history on the other. Literary readings will include works by and about Hans-Georg Gadamer, Hans Robert Jauss, Wolfgang Iser, Roland Barthes, E.D. Hirsch, and Stanley Fish, as well as some later critics of their work; musicology readings will include Carolyn Abbate, Karol Berger, Edward Cone, Bertold Hoeckner, Leo Treitler, and others. Music to be considered will take us from, at least, Machaut to Schoenberg. Requirements include weekly response papers, and a short final paper (10 pages) that explores how one might analyze a composer or composition of the student’s choice through the lens of one of these methodologies.


PHIL 77800 Classics in the Philosophy of Art
Prof. Noel Carroll Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [30213]
This course focuses upon in-depth readings in the history of the philosophy of art in the west including texts by Plato, Aristotle, Francis Hutcheson, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Tolstoy and Clive Bell. The aim of the course is to supply the student with a basic working knowledge of the history of aesthetics in the west.  The course does not presuppose prior course work in philosophy.  The course is a seminar; so students are encouraged to participate in class discussion which will contribute to their grade.  Students will also be required to write a final paper.

 
PHIL 78600 Understanding Locke’s Essay
Prof. Jessica Gordon-Roth Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [30223]

John Locke’s Essay Concerning Human Understanding was the single most widely read academic text in English for a full fifty years after its publication, and Locke's answers to important and currently debated philosophical issues are still cogent today. In fact, John Locke is known as the father of modern empiricism, and Locke’s thoughts on persons paved the way to current theories of personal identity. In this course we will read Locke’s magnum opus, and we will explore not only Locke’s thoughts on nativism and personal identity, but also the role of language, the limits of knowledge, the dangers of enthusiasm, and the debate over substance dualism. Along the way, we will question whether Locke is rightly called an “empiricist,” and the extent to which Locke is committed to the corpuscular hypothesis. The central objective of this course is to deepen and broaden our understanding of Locke’s metaphysical and ontological commitments, within the framework of his epistemic modesty, while gaining a better appreciation for Locke’s influence on current philosophical debates.
 
PHIL 76100 Philosophical Method in Late Plato
Prof. Nickolas Pappas Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [30216]

The Socratic method is a familiar sight in Plato’s dialogues.  Socrates cross-examines an interlocutor, discovers contradictions in what had been that interlocutor’s deeply held beliefs, and often leads the person he’s talking to into a fuller understanding of a philosophical concept and a definition of its terms.

But as he continued to write, Plato made philosophy do more than it had ever dreamt of. Instead of whittling down the scope of philosophy in his later works, or defending positions he’d developed long before, he explored the new things that philosophy could say and do. The Phaedrus and Menexenus picture philosophers composing rhetoric, while the Sophist and Statesman lay out a new system for defining terms (division and collection) and test how widely it can be applied. We find etymology in Plato’s Cratylus, science in the Timaeus, and history in the Critias (as well as in Menexenus and Timaeus).

This survey of the dialogues that are thought to be among Plato’s later works will foreground the picture implicit in them of philosophy as methodologically unformed, ready to become more academic in one respect, more popular in another, more empirical in another way. As far as Plato was concerned, What philosophy is had not yet found its final answer.


PHIL 77700 Rereading Marx
Prof. Graham Priest Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [30215]

Now that the tumultuous events of the twentieth century are passing into history, the time is appropriate to go back and read what Marx said, as opposed to what people claimed he said. In this course we will read a significant part of Marx' corpus, starting with his earliest writings, through to his last works, The aim will be to determine what is to be learned from it at the start of the twenty-first century.

 
PHIL 77500 Ethics
Prof. Steven Ross Wednesdays 11:45-1:45 [30219]

A general introduction to major arguments, the major strategies, in moral theory. The course divides moral theory into kinds of justification stories, and approaches them in that light. To that end, we begin with varieties of non cognitivism and intuitionism, then move to utilitarianism, Kant's Kantianism, Aristotle, and then contemporary Kantianism. The material, as familiar as it may be, is terrific, and for all the variety, there is a kind of unity in the way these are different answers to a series of closely related problems, central among them being "What exactly is going on (if anything) in virtue of which a moral judgment is right, or justified?"


PHIL 76200 Eudaimonism
Prof. Iakovos Vasiliou Mondays 2:00-4:00 [30211]

Eudaimonist is a label attached to almost all of the ethical theories of the ancient Greeks. In Eudaimonist Theories eudaimonia ("happiness") is the "highest good", meaning that it is that for the sake of which we do all that we do. Gregory Vlastos, one of the foremost Plato scholars of the twentieth century, says that once Socrates staked out the "Principle of Eudaimonism" – in his description, that happiness is desired by all human beings as the ultimate end of all of their rational actions – it becomes foundational for almost all subsequent ancient ethical theories.

In this seminar I want to take a critical look at what eudaimonism is and at how eudaimonia functions, particularly in Plato and Aristotle.  What exactly makes one ethical theory eudaimonist and another not?  While it is well known that Plato, Aristotle, the Epicureans, and Stoics all have different views about what eudaimonia is, it is much more rarely asked whether eudaimonia plays different roles in their different ethical theories, so that we find not only distinct conceptions of eudaimonia, but also distinct forms of eudaimonism.  In addition to Plato and Aristotle, we shall consider the views of the Epicureans, Stoics, and some contemporary neo-Aristotelian positions, such as those of Hursthouse and Foot, which tie the human virtues to happiness.

Readings will include selections from Plato's Gorgias, Meno, Republic, Euthydemus, Lysis, and Philebus, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, the Epicureans, Stoics, and contemporary philosophers.  There will be significant engagement with secondary literature to see how scholars have understood ancient eudaimonism. While there is no official prerequisite, some acquaintance with ancient ethics will be helpful.


PSC 82001 Post-Democracy
Prof. Susan Buck-Morss Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [30246]

In a US election year, this seminar considers the question: Are We “Post-Democracy”? Is national democracy a viable political form 200 years after its one-time revolutionary role? Can party politics deliver representation of, by, and for “the people”? Is it possible to believe in democracy when, after electing a 2-term Black President, a social movement is required to insist that Black Lives Matter? Is “bringing democracy to Europe” a viable project, when victories in democratic elections have not changed the course of economic austerity, and the identity of Europe is challenged by half a million refugees? Does global capitalism vitiate popular rule? Does neo-liberalism undermine it?  Given vast migrations of human beings, and given our interconnectedness ecologically, economically, and technologically, how should “the people” be defined? Is state sovereignty democracy’s friend or foe? Has the democratic goal of national liberation failed the post-colonial world? What are the potentials of social media, anarchist practices, and trans-local solidarities for redefining democracy? We will consider new political movements (Arab Spring, Syriza/Indignados, OWS, Black Lives Matter) and read recent works in political theory (W. Brown, D. McKesson, K. Ross, J. Rancière, R. Rorty, N. Loraux, J .Derrida, G. Wilder) that are relevant to this set of questions.
 
 
Partial Reading List
 
Wendy Brown, Undoing the Demos. Neoliberalism’s Stealth Revolution (2015).
Kristin Ross, Communal Luxury
Jacques Rancière, Hatred of Democracy
Jeffrey Green, The Eyes of the People: Democracy in an Age of Spectatorship
Nicole Loraux, The Divided City
Agamben, Civil War
DeRay McKesson, blog
Jacques Derrida, “Declarations of Independence”
Rorty and Mendietta, The Unsustainable American State
“Last Words from Richard Rorty” Progressive June 2007: www.progressive.org/mag_postel10607
Mendietta, on drones. The Terminator. Together with Rawls on 50 years after Hiroshima and Nagasaki
Daniel Allen, Talking to Strangers: Anxieties of Citizenship
David Palumbo-Liu, “Universalisms and Minority Culture,” Differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies 7, no. 1 (1995): 188 Can the Demos be Global? But compare with: Matthieu Fintz, “A Reform for the Poor without Them? The Fate of the Egyptian Health Reform programme in 2005 see Http://www.cedejeg.org.php?article134&lang=fr.
Erik Swyngedouw. 2010. “Apocalypse Forever” Post-Political Populism and the Spectre of Climate Change.” Theory, Culture & Society  (27) (2-3): 213-232.
Erik Swyngedouw, 2011. “Interrogating Post-Democratization: Reclaiming Egalitarian Political Spaces.” Political Geography  30 (7): 370-380.

 
PSC 72001 Machiavelli
Prof. Benedetto Fontana Thursdays 6:30-8:30 [30249]

This course will focus on Machiavelli and his interpreters. It will engage his thought through a close reading of his major political works, The Prince, the Discourses and The Art of War, as well as some of his minor works, The Life of Castruccio Castracani, A Provision for Infantry, Discourse on Remodeling the Government of Florence, the Tercets on Ambition and On Fortune. There is no need to underline the importance of such a course for a student of politics and of political theory. That he has had a broad and profound influence on political thought cannot be denied. He has been called teacher of evil, founder of modernity, partisan of republicanism, defender of tyranny, discoverer of a new science of politics, amoral realist and impassioned idealist. The very ambiguity (and popularity) of the term “Machiavellian” testifies to the range and depth of this influence. In addition, the course will examine different interpretations, or different ways of reading, Machiavelli—such as reason of state, republican, democratic, Straussian, rhetorical and revolutionary. In effect, the course will offer a reading of several of Machiavelli’s writings, and it will at the same time delve into the various approaches to, and interpretations of, his politics and thought.
 
 
PSC 82001 The Politics of Death and Dying
Prof. Nichole Shippen Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [30242]

This course examines what death and dying mean in a selection of political theory and literary texts, and considers how death itself contests and disrupts more traditional understandings of political theoretical concepts. Using political theory as our guide, we will explore how the respective and related theories derived from political, critical, feminist, post-colonial, and afro-pessimism theorize the significance of death and dying for informing the human condition and the meaning of the political theoretical concepts of reciprocity, interdependence, autonomy, freedom, equality, and justice. Our thinking will be intersectional and dialectical in order to consider how gender, sexuality, race, class, and ability inform the politics of death and dying. Judith Butler has persuasively argued that “Part of the very problem of contemporary political life is that not everyone counts as a subject” (2009, 31). Therefore, we will also analyze the political-economic and cultural conditions which most contribute to civil, social, and premature death. In this sense, the politics of death primarily refers to the various ways that conditions of inequality and alterity distort and ultimately shorten lives.  The class is guided by a Hegelian framework, specifically the master/slave dialectic and the question of reciprocity by way of incorporating the theoretical insights of Orlando Patterson’s original concept of “social death,” Jared Sexton’s “social death,” Judith Butler’s concept of “precarious life,” and Achille Mbembe’s “necropolitics” and considering how interdependence and relationality function when distorted by extreme conditions of inequality.


PSYC 80103 Study of Lives
Prof. Jason Van Ora, Mondays 4:15-6:15 [30647]

The Study of Lives invites students to grapple with the uniqueness, challenges, and wisdoms of the individual person.  In addition to reading some seminal life studies, including those of people who contend with various forms of injustice and struggle, we will also reflect on the theories, methodologies, interpretive strategies, and ethical issues connected with the study of lives.  We will focus much of our energies this semester on the "doing" of the work as students sketch the life of another person and draw on these sketches to address a research question of interest.  Throughout the course, we will consider how the study of lives fits with, enhances, and is distinctive from a variety of other conceptual and methodological frameworks that students are engaging within their own research. 

 
PSYC 80103 Queer Psychology
Prof. Kevin Nadal Wednesdays 9:30-11:30 [30650]

This course will provide an overview of the major issues surrounding sexual orientation and gender identity in the field of psychology. The course will review historical and contemporary contexts of heterosexism and genderism, particularly for individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ). Using lectures, discussions, self-reflection activities, and other media
tools, students will also learn about culturally competent skills in working with these populations.
 

PSYC 80103 Just Places: Experience, Documentation, Analysis
Prof. David Chapin Thursdays 2:00-4:00 [30653]

A focus on “Just Places” means a focus on places of justice or places where something is happening that challenges the oligarchy; meaning that we will be going to actual places, spending time there and experiencing them.  We will want to ask for each place something of “What is this place and how did it get to be what it is?”  This will require thoughtful analysis of both the current circumstances as well as archival or other historical digging.   In other words, we will do something of a case study for each of the places that we choose.
 
This seminar is directed towards [and, in fact, needs] participants who will bring different perspectives and different skills.  Graduate students in Environmental Psychology, yes and Critical Social Personality Psychology, yes; but also students in architecture, geography, sociology, anthropology, yes…  We will visit, observe, do video documentary, write, make a website… 
 
The plan for the fall semester is to visit places generally in alternating weeks with in-GC session; and we may want a few field trips on days other than when the seminar is scheduled to meet.  
 

PSYC 79102 Environmental Social Science II: Ecological and Contextual Conceptions of Psychology
Prof. Susan Saegert Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [30630]

This course is the first of two theory courses designed to prepare doctoral students to understand and be able to deploy theoretical positions across the social sciences.   This course focuses on the psychological level of analysis. The theories explored lend themselves to accounts of psychology that can mesh with other levels of analysis.  The course also covers some of the historically important thinkers in environmental and critical social/personality psychology.
 

SOC 84700 Marx’s Grundrisse      
Prof. Stanley Aronowitz Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [30359]

A decade before the publication of Capital, Marx completed a draft of the study. The draft went well beyond the final version which was almost entirely a critique of the categories of political economy. The Grundrisse(rough draft) has important sections that anticipate the later work, including the second and third volumes of Capital.  The Grundrisse, however, which was first translated into English in 1973 covers more ground: an elaborate chapter on money; considerations in the history of human societies that depart from the three stages model enunciated in the German Ideology; significant contributions to the theory of work and labor; a remarkable fragment on the effects of automation on work; a major critique of contemporary theories of surplus value and profit; reflections on poverty and much more.
 
The entire course will be devoted to this single book and its reception. We will read major sections closely, and consider some of the commentaries on it by Negri, Rosdolsky and Stiegler. Prior familiarity with The German Ideology and the Economic and Philosophical Notebooks of 1844 by Marx and Engels is helpful but not required.

        
SOC 74600 Political Economy and Social Life
Prof. Roslyn Bologh Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [30795]

What kinds of changes have been occurring and what kinds of changes are likely to occur in social life over the next five or ten years? Political economy has major consequences for social life -- including inequality, education, urban life, family life, the environment, immigration, ethnic and race relations, labor relations, and gender relations as well as international relations – also for suicide rates, marriage and divorce rates, single parent rates, rates of morbidity and mortality (including longevity) – also for what is called personality structure, character and culture. Thomas Piketty’s book, Capital In the Twenty-First Century, harkens back to Capital written in the nineteenth century by Karl Marx. Piketty argues that twenty-first century capitalism is going to look a lot like nineteenth century capitalism in terms of class inequality. Faculty and students at Harvard have created an interdisciplinary Program in the Study of Capitalism. How can we, as social scientists, analyze political economy and its consequences for social life today and in the coming years? We will compare different analytic perspectives to see which one(s) seem most compelling. We will examine important changes in political economy and explore how these changes were reflected in and changed life in a particular locale, such as New York City. How do researchers and writers link their analyses and descriptions of social life to a larger historical, political economic context, and what difference does that make? 
 
One objective of the course: first draft of a publishable paper on any aspect of social life, but with a political economic framework, context or theoretical analysis, or first draft of a publishable paper that directly engages some issue of political economy.


SOC 80000 Feminist Texts and Theories
Prof. Hester Eisenstein Mondays 2:00-4:00 [30735]

In this course students will consider significant classic and modern texts in the feminist tradition.  The course will cover a series of feminist theories from the 19th to the 21st centuries, including Marxist, radical and liberal perspectives, and ranging from Black, Third World, lesbian and ecofeminist formulations to postmodern/poststructuralist views that question the existence of woman as a category. We will look at issues of race, class, sexuality, and disability in relation to feminist and womanist positions. The class will include readings by Clara Zetkin, Simone de Beauvoir, bell hooks, Chandra Mohanty, and Judith Butler, among others. Students will be expected to be prepared to discuss the readings each week, and to write a weekly short zap or response paper.  The final project for the class will be a 20-25 page research paper, but can also be a film, a video, or a political statement and analysis.   


SOC 76900 Media and Popular Culture Analysis
Prof. Erica Childs Mondays 2:00-4:00 [30355]

This course will explore the myriad of theoretical approaches and methods used to analyze the content, structure, and contexts of media and popular culture in society.  In particular we will explore how cultural meanings convey specific ideologies of gender, race, class, sexuality, nation, and other ideological dimensions.  We will focus on three inter-related dimensions of cultural analysis including the production and political economy of culture, the reading of cultural texts (film, TV, video games, news coverage music, social media, etc.), and the audience reception of those texts (including social media responses).   Students will produce an original research paper employing one of the theoretical frameworks and methodologies of cultural analysis for publication.


THEA 80300 Seminar in Theatre Theory and Criticism: What About Time? The Provocative Conjunctions of Theatre and Temporality
Prof. Maurya Wickstrom Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [30368]

This course will explore the myriad of theoretical approaches and methods used to analyze the content, structure, and contexts of media and popular culture in society.  In particular we will explore how cultural meanings convey specific ideologies of gender, race, class, sexuality, nation, and other ideological dimensions.  We will focus on three inter-related dimensions of cultural analysis including the production and political economy of culture, the reading of cultural texts (film, TV, video games, news coverage music, social media, etc.), and the audience reception of those texts (including social media responses).   Students will produce an original research paper employing one of the theoretical frameworks and methodologies of cultural analysis for publication. Students not enrolled in the Theatre department must contact Prof. Jean Graham-Jones (jgraham-jones@gc.cuny.edu) for permission to register for this class.

 
THEA 81500 Film Theory: French Cinema and French Thought in the Twentieth Century
Prof. David Gerstner Fridays 11:45-3:45 [30370]

To what extent did twentieth-century French intellectual discourse intersect with French film theory, criticism, and filmmaking? By pairing the writings of specific and relevant philosophers with French film critics/filmmakers, the course explores the conceptual relationship between philosophy and cinema. Concerns over theories of language, ritual, phenomenology, existentialism, psychoanalysis, and ideology melded in complex ways with discussions focused on film form, content, and the cinema-as-apparatus. This intellectual and creative dynamic emerges during a critical historical period in which critics and artists rigorously worked through the broad implications of the cinema. By studying the connections between these ideas (and, at times, their overlap) we will put into perspective the way ideas about cinema took hold in France. In doing so, we will screen films that put to the test a mix of philosophical discourse with film theory/making. Furthermore, by grounding these theories and film practices within a historical context (war, art movements, “Americanization,” political protest, colonization) we will consider the rapidly changing French culture that unfolded during the twentieth century and the cinema that recorded these transformations. A preliminary list of readings include selections from Bergson, Freud, Husserl, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, De Beauvoir, Lacan, Wittingstein, Lévi-Strauss, Fanon, Althusser, Cixous, Mulvey, Irigary, and Deleuze; film criticisms and theories include those by Delluc, Dulac, Epstein, Clair, Renoir, Moussinac, Bazin, Morin, Genet, Mitry, Truffaut, Godard, Metz, and Aumont.  Possible filmmakers include Gance, Delluc, Dulac, Epstein, Clair, Renoir, Buñuel, Carné, Grémillon, Rouch, Genet, Marker, Varda, Demy, Resnais, Godard, Pialat, Pontecorvo, Denis, Breillat, and Honoré. Required texts include: Course Reader (selected readings), Alan Williams’ Republic of Images, and Richard Abel’s French Film Theory and Criticism, Volumes One and Two. These books will be available on library reserve.