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Fall 2011

ANTH. 00000 - Student Professional Development

GC: day & time TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Blim, Students do not register for this non-credit workshop.

ANTH. 70000 – Colloquia: Current Topics in Anthro

GC: F, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. C415A, 0 credits, [15829]

ANTH. 70100 - Cultural Anthropology

GC: T, 10:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Robotham, [15831]
Course open to CUNY GC Level 1 Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 70300 - History of Anthro Theory

GC: R, 4:15-7:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Blim/Skurski, [15833]
Course open to CUNY GC Level 1 Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 70500 - Research Methods

GC: W, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Bornstein, [15834]
Fulfills research requirement for Cultural Anthropology.

ANTH. 71100 - Reading Gramsci

GC: M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Crehan, [15835]

An introduction to the work of Antonio Gramsci, one of the most significant thinkers in twentieth century Marxism. The course will focus on the close reading of Gramsci’s own texts (primarily those from the prison notebooks), exploring Gramsci’s relevance for contemporary anthropologists, but will also locate Gramsci and his writings in their historical context. There will be a series of guest presentations by leading Gramsci scholars on specific aspects of his life and work.

ANTH. 72000 - Medical Anthropology

GC: T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Mullings, [15836]

This collaborative course will begin by reviewing the scope and history of the anthropological study of health, illness and healing in various social and cultural contexts. The course will address such topics as: non-biomedical systems of healing; gender and reproduction; the body; the anthropology of HIV/AIDS; gender and reproduction; intersectionality, health and illness; the politics of life and death; and the anthropology of science. Seminar participants are required to do the assigned readings and to write a research paper.

ANTH. 74200 - Ethnol/nog of Mediterranean

GC: F, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Blim/Shannon, [15838]
Fulfills area requirement for Cultural Anthropology.

This course explores issues in the study of the peoples and cultures of the Mediterranean region. We begin with an examination of how the Mediterranean region has been constructed as a culture area for anthropological and historical research, then engage in critical readings of texts on Mediterranean history, political economy, religion and popular culture, food, music, dance, and gender. Readings will draw on case studies from around the Mediterranean and will be supplemented by audio and visual materials when appropriate. Students will prepare weekly response papers as well as a critical annotated bibliography on a selected theme.

ANTH. 77900 - African American Lang/Culture

GC: M, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Spears, [15839]
Fulfills Linguistic Anthro core requirement. This section open to Anthropology students only; cross listed with LING 79800 & ASCP 81500.

This course provides students with a basic understanding of African American English in African American culture and how the study of the language fits into the study of language generally. The emphases will be on grammar and communicative practices and the difference between them and those associated with (1) other U.S. language varieties; and (2) creole languages of the Americas (e.g., Haitian Creole, Jamaican Patwa, and Guyanese Creolese). There will also be analyses of the language with respect to (1) its social, political, and economic contexts; (2) ideologies of dominance; (3) its more prominent speech genres; and (4) its use in educational contexts.

ANTH. 78900 - Phys Anth Professional Devel

GC: F, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Pontzer, [15843]

ANTH. 79000 - Core Course Primate Behavior

HC: T, 9:30am – 12:30 pm, Rm. 705N (Quant Lab), 3 credits, Prof. Swedell, [15841]
NYCEP core course; meets at Hunter.

ANTH. 79000 - Core Evolutionary Morphology

HC: R, 9:30 am- 12:30 pm, Rm. 705N (Quant Lab), 3 credits, Prof. Gilbert, [15840]
NYCEP core course; meets at Hunter.

ANTH. 79100 - Integrative Paleontology I

GC: W, 1:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Harcourt-Smith, [15842]
NYCEP core course; meets at Museum of Natural History.

ANTH. 79800 - Quant Meth in Phys Anthro

NYU: F, 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Raaum, [15844]
Course meets at NYU.

This course provides an introduction to methods of statistical modeling and analysis typically used in physical anthropology. Topics covered include data description, fundamentals of probability, correlation, hypothesis testing, power and sampling, likelihood, Bayesian inference, multivariate methods, and principal components analysis. Students are also introduced to the R statistical programming environment.

ANTH. 80500 - Meth Mod: Qual Data Analysis

GC: R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 1 credit, Prof. Low, [15847]
Course meets 11/17, 11/22, 12/1, 12/8 & 12/5.

This module is organized as an ongoing practicum for the intensive training of graduate students in ethnographic/qualitative data analysis of unstructured and semi structured interviews and field notes. Weekly meetings utilize student fieldwork experience and data collected as the basis for discussion and critique of different qualitative data methods and techniques. Topics will include: coding, content analysis, grounded theory forms of analysis, conversational analysis, other forms of data analysis and writing up of qualitative data for publication. Final paper is an analysis of the text(s) worked on. Grading will include class participation, presentations of analyses in class and the final analytic paper. This module can be taken pass/fail.

ANTH. 80500 - Meth Mod: Structured Intrvwng

GC: R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 1 credit, Prof. Low, [15846]
Course meets Thursdays from 10/13 through 11/10.

This module is organized as an ongoing practicum for the intensive training of graduate students in ethnographic interviewing with a focus on the collection and transcription of structured interviews. Emphasis will be on developing a more sophisticated understanding of interviewing as it relates to issues of reliability and validity and how the structured interview can be used to guide ethnographic fieldwork when a clear research question has been established. Topics will include: establishing a question, developing an interview schedule, how to probe within a structured interview, how to keep the interviewee on the question, issues of comparison, and a review of how race, class, sexual, and gender positions influence the structured interview process. Final paper is an analysis of the text(s) collected. Grading will include class participation, presentations of data in class and the final analytic paper. This module can be taken pass/fail.

ANTH. 80500 - Meth Mod:Unstructured Intrvwng

GC: R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 1 credit, Prof. Low, [15845]
Dates: 9/1/11, 9/22/11, 10/6/11, 10/13/11 (note that spacing of classes will allow time for data collection)

This module is organized as an ongoing practicum for the intensive training of graduate students in ethnographic interviewing with a focus on the collection and transcription of unstructured interviews. Emphasis will be on developing a more sophisticated understanding of interviewing as a communication act with ethical implications that have real life consequences. Topics will include: metacommunication strategies and blunders, techniques of recording, use of fieldnotes with interviewing, referential and indexical errors, problems with transcription, intersubjectivity, insider and outsider considerations, and ethical concerns in terms of power relations and context. Final paper is an analysis of the text(s) that have been collected. Grading will include class participation, presentations of data in class and the final analytic paper. This module can be taken pass/fail.

ANTH. 80800 - Doctoral Dissertation Writing

GC: F, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Skurski, [15848]
Course open to Level 3 Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 80900 - Phenomenology/Existentialsm

GC: W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Crapanzano, [15849]
Cross listed with C L 85000.

Download syllabus [pdf]

ANTH. 81200 - Secularism/Religion/Politics

GC: R, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Asad, [15850]
Instructor’s permission required.

Download syllabus [pdf]

ANTH. 81600 - Environment/Nature/Politics

GC: W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Smith, [15852]

ANTH. 82200 - Situating the Suburbs

GC: F, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Low, [15853]
Cross listed with EES 79903.

Contemporary anthropological studies of the city focus predominantly on the center, producing ethnographies of culturally significant places such as markets, housing projects, gardens, plazas, convention centers, waterfront developments, and homeless shelters that articulate macro and micro urban processes. These studies illuminate both the material and metaphorical power of spatial analysis for theorizing the city. One problem, however, is the perpetuation of an uneasy relationship between suburban and urban studies. The historical division between “rural” and “urban” exacerbates this tendency by sorting researchers into separate disciplinary and methodological camps. The anti-urban sentiment that pervades U.S. culture is often ignored in the assumption that the real centers of power are in the city, and therefore the suburban fringe does not need to be examined critically.

This course, however, contends that the shift to a spatial analysis of the city requires reconsidering this separation in that contradictions and conflicts at the center are often drawn more vividly at the edge. So we find that the extensive suburban “malling of America” is a spatial counterpart of economic restructuring and the de-industrialization of central cities; and the culturally diversity and racial tensions of the center are reflected in the segregation and socially homogeneity of the suburbs. Issues of real estate and land development, new forms of private governance and home ownership, changing patterns of local politics, contested gender roles and transformed social relations are particularly intriguing, mirroring changes in social values that accompany rapid globalization and neoliberal transformations. Understanding these processes and their historical and cultural context provide an important perspective on the central city from the vantage point of the suburb, one that is often overlooked.

This seminar explores these processes through the lens of space, race, class and gender relations. It is a new seminar, and therefore we will focus on ethnographies and geographical analyses of suburbs and cities in the United States as a prototype of suburb development. Students, however, will be asked to select case studies from outside the U.S. for comparative purposes, and will present their findings in class as well as in a comparative final paper. Theoretical readings that accompany the ethnographies will include a wide range of interdisciplinary work drawn from geography, anthropology, and sociology. At least two novels and two films will be included to add to the ethnographic portrayal of suburban America.

ANTH. 83300 - Adv Field Meth in Archaeology

GC: M, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. McGovern [15854]

ANTH. 85100 - Archaeology of Religion/Ritual

GC: W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Pugh, [15855]

This course explores archaeological and other materially-based approaches to religion and ritual. We will consider ritual practitioners, the sacred landscape, architecture, paraphernalia, images, mortuary ritual, archaeoastronomy, sacrifice, and other phenomena. Our exploration of material religion will be framed in the work of theorists such as Durkheim, Marx, Douglas, Levi-Strauss, Marx, Turner, and Geertz. The ultimate goal is a greater appreciation of religious objects and their contexts from use to discard.