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Spring 2009

ANTH. 00000 - Teaching Undergraduate Anthropology

GC:   W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 6402, 0 credits, Prof. Blim 
Meets biweekly, alternating with Professional Development; students do not register for credit.

ANTH. 00000 - Professional Development

GC:   W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 6402, 0 credits, Prof. TBA 
Meets biweekly, alternating with Teaching Undergrad Anthro; students do not register for credit.

ANTH. 70000 - Current Topics in Anthropology

GC:   F, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Lennihan, [95302]

ANTH. 70200 - Core Cultural Anthropology 2

GC:   F, 1:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Crehan, [95304]
Open to Level 1, CUNY Ph.D. Anthropology students only.

This course, like 70100 in the fall, is designed to introduce students to current issues, debates, and controversies in cultural anthropology. The course emphasizes the anthropological contribution to the study of such topics as globalization, development, neoliberalism, colonialism/postcolonialism, popular politics, crime, law, hegemony, resistance, diaspora, multiculturalism, history and memory. Students will demonstrate their mastery of course material by writing a mid-term paper and by taking an in-class written exam at the end of the semester.

ANTH. 70400 - Contemporary Anthro Theory

GC:   R, 4:15-7:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Blim/Verdery, [95306]
Open to Level 1, CUNY Ph.D. Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 70500 - Research Methods

GC:   M, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Sanford, [95308]
Open to CUNY Ph.D. Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 71500 - Black Atlantic:Magic/Sci/Relig

GC:   W, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Collins/Goncalves da Silva, [95309]

Increasingly, anthropologists and historians have come to recognize that modernity is a contested and contradictory configuration that emanates not simply from some securely metropolitan Europe, but from unequal exchanges across world regions. However, a supposedly more singular modernity has long been made real in both social scientific theory and geopolitical relations through claims about religion, science, and magic. In this seminar we examine one crucible of modernity—that space often referred to as the Black Atlantic—through ethnographic and historical considerations of these three overlapping fields of knowledge and practice. And we do so by working to build a dialogue between social scientific work from the Atlantic and recent rethinkings of secularism, belief, agency-based definitions of the human and the civilized, and the relationships between magico-religious epistemologies and liberal democratic politics put together in other world regions, principally Asia and the Middle East. Nonetheless, this seminar emanates from a quite specific position, namely a Brazilian engagement with a world of forced labor and commodity production that has somehow become an engine of modernity. This history of Atlantic exchanges, when examined through some of their most expressive knowledge practices and associated political economic formations in the South Atlantic and the Caribbean, may provoke novel insights into the closely related sphere of anthropology. The seminar is thus a political investigation of a somewhat iconoclastically defined world area and of a discipline. It is intended to push students and professors to produce new ways of formulating knowledge and evaluating evidence in relation to pressing contemporary debates.  Participants will therefore be encouraged to reflect critically on ethnographic and archival methods; on the historical conditions in the Atlantic that have done so much to generate, and make possible, ethnographic interpretation; and hence on their own preparation for, and ability, to engage through social scientific investigation that which takes form as the real and the practical today.

ANTH. 71900 - Marxian Political Economy

GC:   T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Harvey, [95312]
Cross listed with EES 79903.

ANTH 72300 - Ethnography of Space & Place

GC: W. 2:00-4:00PM, Rm. TBA, 3 cr., Prof. Setha Low [95957]
Open to CUNY PhD Anthropology students only.
Cross-listed with PSYCH 80103,EES 79903 & WSCP 81000.

ANTH. 72400 - Race, Class & Gender

GC:   R, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Davis, [95314]
Open to CUNY PhD Anthropology students only.

This course focuses on four axes of power: gender, race, and class. First we will examine the constructions of each and then move to examining how the categories complicates and intersects with the other. This means analyzing, for example, the color of gender, the gender of class, and the sexualities of race. In this course, we seek to increase our understanding of the inequities in our society and the consequences of those inequities for different communities and individuals within the nation. While this course will privilege anthropological perspectives, it will necessarily encompass an interdisciplinary approach.

Course Objectives
This course has been developed as a discussion/seminar that will rely on student participation.
After taking this course, students will be able to:
• Analyze and apply the concepts of gender, race, class, sexuality, privilege and intersectionality
• Assess and articulate the contributions of a range of scholars to feminist thought; and
• Develop and conduct an independent analytical research project.

ANTH. 73800 - Latin America: Race & Nation

GC:   W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Skurski, [95315]
Open to CUNY Ph.D. Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 77000 - Core Course: Linguistic Anthro

GC:   T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Makihara, [95317]
Open to CUNY PhD Anthropology students only. Cross listed with LING 79400.

ANTH. 79000 - Core Crse: Genetics/Human Bio

GC:   T, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Pechenkina, [95318]
NYCEP core.

ANTH. 80800 - Doctoral Dissertation Writing

GC:   F, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. GSUC6402.01, 0 credits, [95322]
Open to Level 3 CUNY PhD Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 81500 - Anthrohistory of the State

GC:   R, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Coronil, [95323]    

What is the state? How does it affect other realms of society and culture? Can one study any aspect of modern societies without also examining the state? How have the state and its effects been approached in specific studies? This course will explore these questions in order to prepare students to carry out research either about the state or in contexts affected by the state. While engaging strictly theoretical texts and seeking to develop theoretical frames, our focus will be on specific studies, mostly by anthropologists and historians. A major concern of this course is the relationship among political power, the production of subjects, and the control of nature.

ANTH. 81600 - Ideology & Space

GC:   T, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Smith, [95324]
Cross listed with EES 79903

ANTH. 82303 - Sem:Fld Meth/Proposal Writing

GC:   R, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Lennihan, [95326]
Open to CUNY Ph.D. Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 82500 - The Urban Revolution

GC:   W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Smith, [95327]
Cross listed with EES 79903

The question of revolution has dropped precipitously out of fashion, and yet the history of societies suggests that revolution happens with considerable frequency.  The focus of this course will be urban revolution insofar as the world’s population is now majority urban.  But the urban focus also comes from the work of Henri Lefebvre whose book, Urban Revolution, was recently translated into English.  That book raises the question of revolution in several different ways.  First, urban revolution for Lefebvre means the social transformation whereby cities have increasingly become the engines of social and economic change.  Second, Lefebvre suggest a much bolder argument whereby urbanization actually supersedes industrialization as the core of capital accumulation and the basis of the survival of capitalism.  Third, written in the aftermath of the 1960s uprisings, Lefebvre also thinks through some issues concerning social revolt in the city.  This course will take on a wide range of issues and topics as a way of opening up the question of what urban revolution might look like and what it maybe ought to look like. 

ANTH 84900 - Advanced Human Ecodynamics and Historical Ecology

GC: M. 11:45am-1:45 pm, Rm. TBA, 3 cr., Prof. Thomas McGovern [95958]
Open to CUNY Ph.D. Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 89000 - Seminar in Physical Anthro

GC:   F, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Raaum, [95330] 
NYCEP seminar

ANTH. 89100 - Primate Models/Human Evolution

GC:   F, 10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Swedell, [95332] 
NYCEP

This course focuses on scenarios of human evolution with a particular emphasis on those derived from studies of nonhuman primates and modern human foraging societies.  We will survey the literature and critically evaluate the various models and scenarios of hominin ecological and social evolution that have been proposed over the past several decades.  This will be a reading- and discussion-based course, with weekly reading assignments from the primary literature and grades based on participation in class discussions, in-class oral presentations, and written assignments.  To register for this course, you must have taken at least one course in biology or biological anthropology, as prior knowledge of evolutionary theory will be assumed.