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Spring 2010

ANTH. 00000 - Teaching Undergraduate Anthropology

GC: W, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 6402, 0 credits, Prof. Blim.
Students do not register for this biweekly workshop.

ANTH. 70000 - Colloquium: Topics in Cultural Anthropology

GC: F, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, [10009]

ANTH. 70200 - Cultural Anthropology II

GC: W, 10:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Crehan [10010]
Course open to level 1 Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 70400 - Contemporary Anthropological Theory

GC: R, 4:15-7:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Blim/Verdery [10011]
Course open to level 1 Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 71700 - Anthropology of Violence

GC: F, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Bornstein [10012]

ANTH. 72300 - Anthropology of Space and Place

GC: F, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Low [10013]
Cross listed with EES 79903. This section open to Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 72500 - Anthropology for the Public

GC: T, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Profs. Mullings/Davis [10014]

This seminar explores the role of anthropological knowledge in shaping public debate and social policy through research, practice and engagement. Seminar participants will interrogate the domains of theoretical, applied and advocacy/activist anthropology, consider classical and recent writing on the role of the public intellectual and review current debates in anthropology. We will then investigate examples of the use of anthropology in reframing and influencing public discussion, policy and advocacy. The seminar will also assess writing styles and other communication techniques (e.g.visual images) appropriate for reaching non-academic audiences; uses of traditional media, digital media and other forms of information dissemination; performance; and community collaboration in research. Seminar participants may meet the requirements for the course through a variety of projects including: exploring an anthropological approach to a topic of interest to the public; working with a community or grassroots organization on research of interest to the organization; writing an article in a format accessible to non-academic audiences; as well as a traditional research paper.

ANTH. 73300 – The Caribbean in the Atlantic World

GC: W, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Skurski [10015]
This section open to Anthropology students only.

The region of the Caribbean has played a fundamental role in the emergence of the modern world. As a crucible of modern social and cultural transformations, this region has been at the center of competing imperial formations and contending globalizing forces. As the site of the devastation of indigenous populations, the importation of African slaves, the establishment of plantation systems, the only successful slave revolution, and the immigration of diverse populations, it has been marked by widely divergent forms of political response and of cultural identity, ranging from ethnic to nationalist, from dictatorial to revolutionary. Processes of cultural creativity and transformation have marked the Caribbean, as reflected in arenas such as literature, the visual arts and music. Yet the Caribbean has only recently been studied as a site of theoretical significance, central in the definition and the critique of disciplinary formations and conceptual categories, including concepts of race, class, and civilization.This course examines major themes in the formation of the Caribbean as well as currents of social thought that have defined its study. Drawing on an Atlantic studies perspective, it explores the processes that have connected the making of the Caribbean, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. While the course focuses on the Spanish speaking Caribbean, it emphasizes intersections and movements across the region and the Atlantic. The course will integrate the study of political change, cultural transformations, and reflections on the geopolitics of empires. Music and popular religion will provide an important perspective through which to understand these processes as well as the views of non-elites. Authors will include Caribbean thinkers as well as analysts of the Caribbean and the Atlantic world, such as Martí, Ortiz, CLR James, Fanon, Cesaire, Kincaid,Flores, Guilbault, Moore, Ortiz, Sublette, Los Van Van, Davis, de la Fuente, Dubois, Mintz, Price, Matory, Harrison, Holt, Scott, Torres, Trouillot, Turits, Wade, and Yelvington. Students will write comments on the readings as well as a final paper, which may be either a literature review essay or a research paper.

ANTH. 78900 – Professional Development in Physical Anthropology

GC: F, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Harcourt-Smith [10016]

ANTH. 79000 - Core Course in Physical Anthropology

GC: F, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Harcourt-Smith [10910]
Course open to Anthropology students only. Fulfills physical Anthropology subfield requirement.

ANTH. 79100 - Integrated Paleoanthropology II

NYU: T, 2:00-5:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Plummer [10017]

ANTH. 80600 - Studies in Anthropology

GC: M, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Creed [10906]
Permission of instructor required.

ANTH. 80700 - Reading Marx's Capital

GC: M, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. C415A, 3 credits, Prof. Harvey [10018]
Cross listed with EES 79903.

ANTH. 80800 - Doctoral Dissertation Writing

GC: F, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 0 credits, Prof. Skurski [10019]
Open to Level 3 Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 81000 - Seminar: Decolonization

GC: T, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Wilder [10020]

ANTH. 81300 - Social Theory and Literature

GC: Meeting day and time TBA. Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Harvey [10909]
Permission of instructor required.

ANTH. 81500 - Producing Anthropological Works: Methods through Studies of Nature, the State, and Commodification

GC: R, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Coronil [10021]

Academic disciplines are knowledge formations constantly transformed not just by each other, but by the changing historical conditions of their production. Among the social sciences, anthropology has been particularly receptive both to the influence of other disciplines (e.g. history and linguistics) and to the changing waves of a wide range of intellectual currents (such as liberalism, marxism, structuralism, cultural studies, postcolonial studies, and feminism). Treating as its focus the creative moments of anthropology’s trans/formation, this course seeks to prepare students in anthropological methods, understood as techniques intertwined with theoretical approaches,  by examining texts that instantiate current practices and significant shifts in the field.

The seminar is at once practical and theoretical. It addresses questions of method by examining how texts—articles and monographs—have been produced. Since one of the premises of this course is that academic knowledge is at its best when it subordinates disciplinary matters to substantive issues, it focuses on disciplinary methods by exploring central  questions concerning the interrelations among the state, nature, and commodification. The course is thus designed for students interested in these questions as well as in methods and frameworks to study them.

The course is intended for students at any stage of their studies. It is structured as a workshop; students will be required to read texts carefully, prepare comments for class, and produce a text related to their interests—a paper, research proposal, a review of the literature, a chapter of a dissertation or an article for publication.

ANTH. 82303 – Proposal Writing

GC: W, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Maskovsky [10022]
Open to Anthropology students only

This seminar helps graduate students to prepare fieldwork grant applications and dissertation proposals. Topics addressed include defining researchable questions, designing an effective fieldwork plan, IRB protocols, research proposal evaluation criteria, peer-review processes, and other theoretical and methodological topics that are relevant to the task of proposal writing. (Please note that some knowledge of the techniques of collecting, coding, analyzing and interpreting ethnographic and historical evidence is presupposed.)

The seminar is organized as an intensive workshop, and each student is provided with numerous opportunities to prepare draft proposals and to present them for discussion and review.  Before the semester begins, each student must complete a proposal writing exercise, the content of which becomes the first draft of a grant application.  He or she then makes incremental revisions to this draft until a proposal is ready for submission to a major funder.  The goal of the workshop is for each student to produce two fieldwork grant applications by the semester’s end.  

For maximum benefit, participants need to be open to constructive criticism and to the possibility of rethinking parts of their own research projects while also maintaining a supportive and non-competitive, yet rigorous approach to the review of other people’s proposals.  Download proposal writing exercise.

ANTH. 82500 - Urban Revolution

GC: T, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Smith [10023]
Cross listed with EES 79903.

ANTH. 83700 - Lithic Analysis

HC: F, 5:30-7:30p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Parry [11050]
Open to Anthropology students only.

ANTH. 84100 - World of the Vikings

H: M, 5:35-7:25 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. McGovern [10907]
Open to Anthropology students only.

Download syllabus

ANTH. 84200 - Quantitative Methods

H: M, 5:30-7:20 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Johnson [10024]
Note: Fulfills Research Methods course requirement.

ANTH. 84900 - Historic Ecology & Human Ecodynamics

H: R, 5:35-7:25 p.m., Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. McGovern [10908]
Course open to Anthropology students only.

Download syllabus

PSYC 80102 Methods Module: Unstructured and Structured Interviewing

GC: R. 2:00-4:00p.m., Rm.TBA, 2 credits, Prof. Low
NOTE: offered 1/28/10-3/11/10

PSYC 80101 Methods Module: Ethnographic/Qualitative Data Analysis

GC: R. 2:00-4:00, p.m., Rm. TBA, 1 credit, Prof. Low
NOTE: Offered 3/18, 25; 4/8, 29; and 5/13/2010.