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Spring 2000 - Physical Anthropology Seminar

Seminar in Physical Anthropology

New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology

NYCEP Colloquia Spring 2000


Selected Fridays, 2-4pm, Rm. 6417 GC
This year's Seminar Topic is Primate Conservation.

 

  • February 4
    Andrew Burrell, NYU
    The role of economic development projects in primate conservation

     

  • February 18
    Danielle Whittaker, CUNY
    Movin' monkeys: Captive breeding, rehabilitation, reintroduction, and translocation as tools in primate conservation

     

  • March 10
    Rachel Dvoskin, NYU
    Ethical considerations in primate conservation and research

     

  • March 24
    advanced students discussing dissertation research:
    Kieran McNulty, CUNY
    Morphometric and Phylogenetic analyses of hominoid facial morphology
    Wendy Dirks, NYU
    The relationship of life history variables to dental development in catarrhines
    Chris Robinson, NYU
    The functional morphology of the mandible in hominoids
    Varsha C. Pilbrow, NYU
    What discrete dental characters, if any, can be used to differentiate and diagnose the four genera of extant hominoids? A dental variation study

     

  • March 31
    various students
    Problems and pitfalls of dissertation writing--workshop for students only.

     

  • April 2
    Marc Moniz, CUNY
    Systematic questions in conservation research, and Systematics Agenda 2000

     

  • April 28
    Prof. Andrew Hill, YALE
    From Equatorius to Homo: Paleoanthropological Research in the Tugen Hills, Kenya

     

  • May 5
    Paula Lee, CUNY
    The role of primate communication in conservation studies

     

  • May 12
    advanced students discussing dissertation research:
    Larissa Swedell, COLUMBIA
    Social behavior of female hamadryas baboons
    Rebeca Araya, NYU
    Social and genetic structure in two New World primates:
    what's love got to do with it?
    Elena Cunningham, CUNY
    Pithecia foraging decisions

     

  • May 19
    Prof. Simon Bearder, Oxford Brookes University
    How to study primates at night - a guide to field methods
    (NOTE: this seminar will take place in Rm. C198)