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Art History: Student Honors, Awards, Publications, and Other Activities: 2012

Leslie Anne Anderson is the recipient of a Fulbright Grant to Denmark, an American-Scandinavian Foundation Fellowship, and the Einar and Eva Lund Haugen Memorial Scholarship from the Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study for the 2012-2013 academic year. Anderson served as the 2011-2012 Kress Interpretive Fellow at the Indianapolis Museum of Art and she published “Painting Instruction: C. W. Eckersberg and Artistic Labor in the Danish Golden Age” in Athanor XXIX. 
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Anastasia Aukemann was awarded the Luce/ACLS Dissertation Fellowship in American Art.
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Sarah Bane will be an Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow at the Newark Museum in 2012-2013.
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Raffaele Bedarida has lectured at MoMA, the Guggenheim Museum, and Parsons. He coedited a book with Daniele Astrologo Abadal, Prima che il Gallo Canti (Allemandi, 2011), and published three articles: “Tra ufficialità e censura: Corrado Cagli, 1937-1940,” in Arte, critica e istituzioni in Italia fra le due guerre, ed. Davide Lacagnina (Edizioni di passaggio, 2011); “New Decade, New Italy: Afro and the Image of Italy in the US between Reconstruction and Economic Miracle,” in Afro Basaldella. The American Period, ed. Gabriella Belli (Mondadori / Electa, 2012); “Operation Renaissance: Italian Art at MoMA, 1940-1949” in Oxford Art Journal, 35/2 (June 2012). Raffaele has received a  2012-2013 Graduate Center Dissertation Fellowship.
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Tara Burk’s dissertation examines the relationship between public art and spatial politics during the urban upheaval of New York City in the 1980s and 1990s. During the 2011-2012 academic year Tara presented papers at the Southeastern College Art Conference, the Cornell University Graduate Student Conference, the College Art Association Annual Meeting, and the IFA-Frick Symposium on the History of Art. This spring, Tara taught an undergraduate course on Feminist Art Since 1970 at Rosemont College and organized an event entitled “Queer Collaborations: A Conversation between Cheryl Dunye and Sarah Schulman.” During the 2012-2013 academic year Tara will work on her dissertation as a graduate fellow at the Center for Place, Culture and Politics at the Graduate Center.

Tara Burk was also an organizer, with Jarrett Earnest, of a conversation hosted by the Ph.D. Program in Art History between Cheryl Dunye and Sarah Schulman, moderated by David Gerstner. Dunye is an award-winning filmmaker who consistently addresses race and sexuality in her films. She is particularly well known for her mock documentary, The Watermelon Woman (1996), for which she (with Zoe Leonard) created the photo-based “The Fae Richards Archive,” about a fictional black film star from the early days of cinema. More recently, Dunye co-wrote the films The Owls (2010) and Mommy is Coming (2012) with Sarah Schulman—a noted queer activist, author and distinguished professor of humanities at the College of Staten Island, CUNY. To a full audience, Dunye and Schulman discussed the tribulations of producing and distributing their low-budget, independent films in a heterosexist global film market. Gerstner, a professor of film studies at the Graduate Center, provided a scholarly framework and discussed the impact of identity politics and the history of cinema on Dunye and Schulman’s collaborative practice. The event was sponsored with a grant from the John Rewald Endowment of the Ph.D. Program in Art History at The Graduate Center.

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Arden Decker-Parks was awarded a 2011-12 Fulbright scholarship in Art and Architectural History.
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"Pedagogy, Provocation and Paradox: Denmark's Kunstnernes Studieskole," written by Kerry Greaves, will appear in a special issue (October 2012) on education and nationalism of The Journal for Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism. It deals with alternative art education in Copenhagen in the late 19th century and the break of modernists with the Royal Academy. The paper of the same title was awarded the best graduate student paper given at the 2011 Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study conference.
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Lee Hallman will be an Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow at the Museum of Modern Art in 2012-13.
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In Fall 2011 Margaret Laster completed a 13-month residency at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington DC as the inaugural Fellow for the Lunder Consortium for Whistler Studies, a scholarly collaboration of the Freer and Sackler, Colby College Museum of Art, and the University of Glasgow. The symposium she proposed and developed, “Palaces of Art: Whistler and the Art Worlds of Aestheticism,” was held at the Freer in October 2011, and included participants from Europe, the United States, and Japan. In Winter/Spring 2012, she was Leon Levy Fellow at the Center for the History of Collecting at the Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library.   This past year she gave Fellows' talks at the Freer Gallery and the Frick Collection, and was an invited speaker at the Delaware Art Museum.
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Paul Ranogajec presented a paper in May 2011 titled "The Neo-Georgian and Beaux-Arts Urbanism in New York City," at Re-Appraising the Neo-Georgian 1880-1980, a conference at the Paul Mellon Centre in London. Plans are under way to include a revised version of this paper in a volume on Neo-Georgian architecture by a British publisher in 2013. Paul completed entries on Louis Bourgeois, Mary Cassatt, and Eva Hesse for a forthcoming encyclopedia on American women's history. In January his review of Alice Friedman's book American Glamour and the Evolution of Modern Architecture appeared in Planning Perspectives. In the fall he taught 16th-Century Italian Art at York College. Much progress was made this year on his dissertation, which he'll complete this summer.
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Britany Salsbury was awarded a fellowship from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to participate in the 2012 Summer Institute in Technical Art History at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University. She published a book review of Anna Sigrídur Arnar’s The Book as Instrument: Stéphane Mallarmé, The Artist's Book, and the Transformation of Print Culture in the Winter 2012 issue of Art in Print. In 2012-13 she will be an Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
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Beth Saunders received the 2012-13 Marian and Andrew Heiskell Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize in Modern Italian Studies from the American Academy in Rome, as well as a Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship from the Metropolitan Museum of Art (declined), and a Graduate Center Dissertation Fellowship. She served as cochair of the panel "The Subject Speaks? Reading into the Photograph" at Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC) in Savannah, Georgia, in November 2011, and presented dissertation research at the Developing Room Symposium "Photography and Its Origins" at Rutgers on April 27, 2012. Her review of Tanya Sheehan's book Doctored: The Medicine of Photography in Nineteenth Century America will be published in the July issue of Photography and Culture. During the 2011-12 academic year, Beth also served as part-time faculty at the Rhode Island School of Design and an adjunct lecturer at Rhode Island College.
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Janna Schoenberger began working as a core faculty member at Amsterdam University College in Amsterdam, Netherlands, in August 2011. Her article "Deadpan at Work in Almerisa: Rineke Dijkstra's Transcultural Photographic Series" was published in Crossing Boundaries and Transforming Identities: New Perspectives in Netherlandic Studies (Nodus Pulikationen, 2011). She presented "Ludic Conceptualism: Bas Jan Ader, a Dutchman Playing Abroad" at CAA in February 2012. 
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Gillian Sneed presented a paper titled "Manifestations of Queer: Queer Temporality, Desire, and Disidentification in the Performance Art of Sharon Hayes" at Southeastern College Art Conference (SECAC) in Savannah, Georgia, in November 2011. She was selected to cochair a panel titled "Dance is Hard to See: Moving Bodies and Visual Art Practice" at SECAC in Durham, N.C., in November 2012.
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Alise Tifentale has recently published a book, The Photograph as a Work of Art in Latvia, 1960–1969 (Neputns, 2011). The book summarizes an extensive archival research on the emergence of photography as a form of unofficial art in Latvia under the Soviet occupation. Research focuses on twelve photographers and artists who met at the recently established Riga Camera Club (1962) and soon gained a reputation of creative avant-garde throughout the Soviet Union. Among the major aspirations of these artists was striving for international recognition despite the Iron Curtain. They succeeded to maintain contact with outside world, partly protected by the amateur status of photographic art in the Soviet hierarchy of art media.

Submitted on: JUL 30, 2012

Category: Art History, Students Honors, Awards, and Publications