Show The Graduate Center Menu
 
 

IPoRT Fellows


Darshanand H. Ramdass
IPoRT Fellow 2009-2012


Currently I am an Assistant Professor at St. Joseph’s College. I have just received approval to begin a research project investigating the role of learning strategies in homework completion and success in a statistics course. I also facilitate a wellness program at Wyckoff Hospital in Brooklyn. In addition, I am working with a team of doctors and staff to design an intervention study in the gastroenterology department. Courses that I teach include Introduction to Psychology, Research Methods, Senior Research Thesis, Internship mentor, History of Psychology and Systems, and Psychology of Personality

The experience I had as an IPoRT fellow was amazing. The three years I spent as a fellow were the best in my educational career. It afforded me an opportunity to work with an amazing team of researchers at the CREATE lab and learn more of the research process. Along with building on prior skills, I learned about research design in technology and science. Overall, the fellowship made me more confident in my ability to market my skills to potential employers in a range of settings from research to academic (private, non-profit, and government). Finally, I had the two best mentors in the world, namely, Dr, Zimmerman and Dr. Homer. I am truly humbled by their compassion and passion for what they do and their immense support during my fellowship year

Publications Supported by the IPoRT Fellowship


Ramdass, D. (2011). Enhancing mathematics skill and self-regulatory competency through observation and emulation. The International Journal of Research and Review, 7(1), 24-44.  

Ramdass, D., & Zimmerman, B. J. (2011).  Developing self-regulation skills: The important role of homework. Journal of Advanced Academics, 22, 194-218.

Ramdass, D., & Zimmerman, B. J. (2011). The effects of modeling and social feedback on middle school students’ math performance and accuracy judgments. The International Journal of Educational and Psychological Assessment, 7(1), 4-23.
 

Other Recent Publications


Ramdass, D. (2012). The role of cognitive apprenticeship in learning science in a virtual world. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 7(4), 985-992. DOI: 10.1007/s11422-012-9442-y

Ramdass, D., & Bembenutty, H. (2012). Exploring self-regulatory behaviors during music practice among South Asian American instrumental students. The International Journal of Research and Review, 9(1), 1-31.  

Webpage:  www.sjcny.edu/Directory/1115
 


 

Paul A. O'Keefe
IPoRT Fellow 2009-2011

Currently, I am a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University working with Carol S. Dweck. My research focuses on the pursuit of goals with particular attention to achievement motivation, self-regulation, interest, and lay theories.

During my time as an IPoRT Fellow, I worked on various projects that examined learning and motivation within the context of educational technology. One project examined how the mode of playing a math game affected motivation, performance, and learning. In particular, we examined individual, competitive, and collaborative modes of play. My other collaborations employed eye-tracking technology to examine visual patterns between design features in a computer simulation that contributed to the effective learning of chemistry concepts.

My experience as an IPoRT Fellow was very positive. It afforded me the opportunity to not only apply my expertise in a new domain, but also to learn about methodologies and content outside of my area of specialization. It was a very collaborative and productive experience.

Publications Supported by the IPoRT Fellowship


*Co-first author

*Plass, J., *O’Keefe, P. A., Homer, B. D., Case, J., Hayward, E., Stein., M., & Perlin, K. (2013). The impact of individual, competitive, and collaborative mathematics game play on learning, performance, and motivation. Journal of Educational Psychology.  doi: 10.1037/a0032688

O’Keefe, P. A., Lataurneau, S., Milne, C., Homer, B. D.,  Schwartz, R., & Plass, J. L. (under review). The impact of individual, competitive, and collaborative game play on performance and motivation.

Other Recent Publications


O’Keefe, P. A. (2013). Mindsets and self-evaluation: How beliefs about intelligence can create a preference for growth over defensiveness. In S. B. Kaufman (Ed.), Beyond Talent or Practice: The Complexity of Greatness. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

O’Keefe, P. A., Ben-Eliyahu, A., & Linnenbrink-Garcia, L. (2013). Shaping achievement goal orientations in a mastery-structured environment and concomitant changes in related contingencies of self-worth. Motivation and Emotion, 37(1), 50–64. doi: 10.1007/s11031-012-9293-6

Plante, I., O’Keefe, P. A., & Théorêt, M. (2013). The relation between achievement goal and expectancy-value theories in predicting achievement-related outcomes: A test of four theoretical conceptions. Motivation and Emotion, 37(1), 65–78. doi:10.1007/s11031-012-9282-9

Linnenbrink-Garcia, L., Middleton, M., Ciani, K. D., Easter, M. A., O’Keefe, P. A., & Zusho, A. (2012). Performance approach and avoidance goal orientations: Pressing theoretical and methodological concerns. Educational Psychologist, 47(4) 281-301. doi: 10.1080/00461520.2012.722515


Webpage people.stanford.edu/paokeefe




Florrie Ng
IPoRT Fellow 2008-2009


I am currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. The main focus of my research is on understanding parenting and children's achievement motivation.

As an IPoRT fellow I worked with the Consortium for Research and Evaluation of Advanced Technologies in Education (CREATE) at NYU. Projects I was involved with included the investigation and coding of classroom behaviors for Molecules and Minds, a project whose goal is to develop chemistry simulations that are effective for learners of different backgrounds and achievement levels, as well as a review of prior research on  educational games for the Games for Learning Institute. 
 

 

Publications Supported by the  IPoRT Fellowship


Plass, J. L., Milne, C., Homer, B. D., Schwartz, R. N., Hayward, E. O., Jordan, T., Verkuilen, J., Ng, F., Wang, Y., & Barrientos, J. (2012). Investigating the effectiveness of computer simulations for chemistry learning. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 49, 394-419.


Ng, F. F., Tamis-LeMonda, C. S., Godfrey, E. B., Hunter, C., & Yoshikawa, H. (2012). Dynamics of parents’ goals for children in ethnically diverse populations across the first three years of life. Social Development, 21, 821-848. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9507.2012.00664.x


Tamis-LeMonda, C. S., Sze, I., Ng, F. F., Kahana Kalman, R., & Yoshikawa, H. (2012). Cultural similarities and differences in maternal teaching during play with 4-year olds. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly.

 

Recent Publications


Ng, F. F., Pomerantz, E. M., & Deng, C. (2012). Why are Chinese parents more psychologically controlling than American parents? “My child is my report card.” Child Development.

Webpage: www.fed.cuhk.edu.hk/eps/people/ngfy.html

Darshanand H. Ramdass, (IPoRT Fellow 2009-2012)
Currently I am an Assistant Professor at St. Joseph’s College. I have just received approval to begin a research project investigating the role of learning strategies in homework completion and success in a statistics course. I also facilitate a wellness program at Wyckoff Hospital in Brooklyn. In addition, I am working with a team of doctors and staff to design an intervention study in the gastroenterology department. Courses that I teach include Introduction to Psychology, Research Methods, Senior Research Thesis, Internship mentor, History of Psychology and Systems, and Psychology of Personality
The experience I had as an IPoRT fellow was amazing. The three years I spent as a fellow were the best in my educational career. It afforded me an opportunity to work with an amazing team of researchers at the CREATE lab and learn more of the research process. Along with building on prior skills, I learned about research design in technology and science. Overall, the fellowship made me more confident in my ability to market my skills to potential employers in a range of settings from research to academic (private, non-profit, and government). Finally, I had the two best mentors in the world, namely, Dr, Zimmerman and Dr. Homer. I am truly humbled by their compassion and passion for what they do and their immense support during my fellowship year