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Kandice Chuh
Position: Professor of English, Graduate Center
Phone: 212-817-8321
Office Hours: By appointment
Degrees/Diplomas: Ph.D. University of Washington
Research Interests: 20th century U.S. literatures and American studies; Asian American and comparative ethnic literary studies; minority discourse; critical/queer theory and critical race studies; disciplinarity and difference; globalization and global feminisms; aesthetics and cultural studies
Specialization: African American Literature and Literary Theory|Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist/Queer Theory|Literature after 1945|Poetics and Aesthetic Theory|Postcolonial, Transnational, and Global Literature and Theory

WORK IN PROGRESS
The Difference Aesthetics Makes: U.S. Minority Discourse Post-Identity.  Book length study of aesthetic theory and U.S. minority discourse with a particular emphasis on questions of post-identity subjectivity.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS
Authored book:

Imagine Otherwise: on Asian Americanist Critique (Duke University Press 2003).  215pp. 
Winner, 2004 American Studies Association Lora Romero Best First Book Publication Award.

Edited collections:
Orientations: Mapping Studies in the Asian Diaspora, with Karen Shimakawa (Duke University Press 2001).  376pp.

Special issue of The Journal of Asian American Studies, “On Korean ‘Comfort Women.’”  vol. 6, no. 1 (February 2003)

Essays:
“Of Hemispheres and Other Spheres: Navigating Karen Tei Yamashita’s Literary Worlds.”

American Literary History, vol. 18, no. 3 (2006):618-637.  Reprinted in Hemispheric
American Studies, edited by Robert Levine and Caroline Levander (Rutgers UP, 2007).

“Edward Said in Counterpoint.”  Amerasia Journal  31, 1 (2005):22-23.

“Discomforting Knowledge, Or, Korean ‘comfort women’ and Asian Americanist Critical Practice,” The Journal of Asian American Studies, vol. 6, no. 1 (February 2003), 5-23.

"Transnationalism and Its Pasts," Public Culture, vol. 9, no. 1 (1996): 93-112.

“Asian American Literatures and American Cultural Studies.” In Contemporary Approaches to American Culture.  Ed. Jonathan Auerbach and Nguyen Lien.  (Hanoi, Vietnam: University of Social Sciences and Humanities, 2001), 165-90.