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Program Events

Events


Tuesday, September 30, 2014: "The Impact of Foods and Cuisine on Culture in France and the Francophone World," an online forum by the Henri Peyre Institute. To participate, click here to register for the Institute's online forum. Additional information on this and other Henri Peyre Institute activities is available on their website.

Monday, October 6, 2014: "Désidentification-Réembrayage-Bricolage, ou d’une poétique contemporaine," a lecture by Jérôme Game, Poet and Professor of Philosophy and Film Studies at the American University of Paris. 6pm. Room 4116 (Comparative Literature/Spanish Lounge).

Wednesday, October 15, 2014: "La Beauté de la haine, des guerres de religion à Céline," a lecture by Jan Miernowski, Professor of French at University of Wisconsin at Madison. 6:30pm. Room 4202.

Monday, October 20, 2014: "The Travesty of Justice," a talk by Michèle D. Pierre-Louis (President of Fondation Connaissance et Liberté-FOKAL), sponsored by The Henri Peyre French Institute, the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, and the Ph.D./ M.A. Program in Political Science at The Graduate Center of CUNY. 6pm-8pm. Rooms 9204/9205.

Monday, November 10, 2014: "The Taste of Salt: Consuming and Talking about SALTED FISH in Early Modern Culture," an online forum by the Henri Peyre Institute. To participate, click here to register for the Institute's online forum. 1pm-7pm.

More events will be added as the semester progresses.

Event Descriptions


Tuesday, September 30, 2014: "The Impact of Foods and Cuisine on Culture in France and the Francophone World," an online forum by the Henri Peyre Institute. To participate, click here to register for the Institute's online forum. Additional information on this and other Henri Peyre Institute activities is available on their website.

Are you interested in the ways foods and cuisine impact culture in France and in the Francophone world, in the distant past and in the present? Join our first Food Seminar Online Forum. This forum is an event of our ongoing seminar, Food, Power, Exchange and Identity: Food and Foodstuffs in the French and Francophone Worlds. 

We invite you to our ongoing debate on the practices of food preparation and consumption from the 19th century to the early 20th century, and to contribute to our overall project. Watch our video stream of the talk on “The Discourses of Food from the 19th-century to the Inter-war Period,” by Julia Przybos, Joseph Rienti and Lauren K. Christensen. View our online exhibit “French Street Fairs and Street Foods, from the 1800s to the early 20th century.

To participate, click here to register on our forum page.
 

Monday, October 6, 2014: "Désidentification-Réembrayage-Bricolage, ou d’une poétique contemporaine," a lecture by Jérôme Game, Poet and Professor of Philosophy and Film Studies at the American University of Paris. 6pm. Room 4116 (Comparative Literature/Spanish Lounge).

Jérôme Game is an award-winning teacher of Film Studies and Philosophy currently on the faculty of the American University of Paris. He is also a poet who travels between Paris and New York, and it is (in) this movement that his poetry operates: The fluidity of the real – of bodies, cities, languages, images, events, collective or individual – via that of signs, and vice versa. As an academic, Game has taught at Cambridge, London and Columbia Universities and received research grants from the Mellon Foundation, Cambridge University, the American University of Paris, Université Paris 8, Institut Français, Centre National du Livre, the British Council amongst others. His research interests focus on a theoretical and critical examination of modern visual/literary culture (cinema, visual arts, literature) around a philosophical reworking of subjectivity and time. As a poet, he has been described as “a writer at once inside and outside of literature: tooling up with textual cameras and microphones to compose open-ended narratives” (Flora Moricet). Famous for its effects of stuttering and voice bloquage, his poetry creates rich effects of hindrance and interruption in écrire à même les choses, ou (2004) and ça tire (2008); breaking up the verse as well as the utterance into irreducible syncope, thus opening up meaning and expanding it.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014: "La Beauté de la haine, des guerres de religion à Céline," a lecture by Jan Miernowski, Professor of French at University of Wisconsin at Madison. 6:30pm. Room 4202.

Can one consider hatred to be beautiful? Prof. Jan Miernowski doesn't seek to justify such an ugly passion, but rather to explore the most extreme hatred, the type of pure hatred that does not need political, economic, or psychological motivation for mass killings and destruction. Such self-sufficient hatred can be better grasped when considered as an aesthetic principle. Indeed, the beauty of hatred informs key moments of French literary writing between early and post-modernity: anterotic poetry of the Renaissance, as well as the most vitriolic pamphlets of religious wars. The beauty of hatred is prominent in Corneille’s and Racine’s conception of tragedy, Rousseau’s thinking about literature, and Céline’s perverse vision of the sublime. Finally, hatred becomes an autonomous object of art, and manifests itself in the contemporary novel through pastiche and parody. When writing about the hatred that has destroyed her country, Nobel laureate Wisława Szymborska admitted with irony: “Let’s not lie to ourselves: she is capable of creating beauty…” Although hatred can indeed create beauty, only literature has an unlimited capacity to explain and heal the world.

Monday, October 20, 2014: "The Travesty of Justice," a talk by Michèle D. Pierre-Louis (President of Fondation Connaissance et Liberté-FOKAL), sponsored by The Henri Peyre French Institute, the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, and the Ph.D./ M.A. Program in Political Science at The Graduate Center of CUNY.
Haiti’s justice system functions in such paradoxical ways that it appears to reinforce impunity. Overcrowded jails are costly to maintain on an already tight budget while pretrial detention affects close to 90% of the prison population. Official executive rhetoric constantly reaffirms the independence of the judicial system when at the same time interference from Government and Parliament can free or detain defendants depending on their political ties. For the past twenty five years there has been an ongoing reform of the system on which millions are spent on international experts to review codes and procedures but with practically no results, while judges and prosecutors remain poorly trained, underpaid and subject to temptations and pressure by alleged criminals. What are the causes of such a persistent situation in times of dictatorship or of “democratic transition”? What is the meaning of “the rule of law” under such circumstances? What is the meaning of justice for a historically marginalized majority?