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Fall 2010

September 16, 2010: Sophie Marinez: Gender, Architecture, and Self-Construction in the Works of Mademoiselle de Montpensier

October 18, 2010Martine Reid and Domna C. Stanton: Publishing French Women Authors: A Dialogue

November 23, 2010Sarah Wilson: The Visual World of French Theory

Preview of Events for Spring 2011:

February 18th, 2011Annual Graduate Student Conference: Collective Identities: Policies and Poetics

 

Event Descriptions


Sophie Marinez, Gender, Architecture, and Self-Construction in the Works of Mademoiselle de Montpensier
Thursday, September 16 at 6:00-7:30pm

Sophie Marinez is Visiting Assistant Professor of French and Francophone Studies at Vassar College.

Cosponsored with the Society for the Study of Women in the Renaissance.

Concourse 197

Martine Reid and Domna C. Stanton: Publishing French Women Authors: a Dialogue
Monday, October 18, 2010 at 6:30-8:30pm

Martine Reid, Professor of French at Lille III, and Domna C. Stanton, Distinguished Professor of French at the Graduate Center, CUNY, will talk about their experiences publishing the texts of French Women writers, as well as on their own research on women authors. Martine Reid is the editor of the collection "Femmes de Lettres" (Gallimard). Her most recent book is Des femmes en littérature (Belin, 2010). Domna Stanton is editor and co-translator of two volumes for the series "The Other Voice in early Modern Europe" (Chicago University Press). She is author of Women Writ, Women Writing: Gender Discourse and Differences in Seventeenth-Century France (Chicago, 2007).

Rooms 9204-9205

 

Sarah Wilson: The Visual World of French Theory
Tuesday, November 23rd at 6:30pm

Join Sarah Wilson as she speaks about her revelatory work on prominent French philosophers of the 1960s and 1970s—including Sartre, Deleuze, Bourdieu, and Foucault—and their encounters with the artists of their times, most particularly the protagonists of the Narrative Figuration movement. Wilson brings to life the intense and radical thinking of the period through this unique dialogue between the artists and writers of the time—in critical texts and catalogue prefaces—that illuminates not only the work of the artists but also the production of the philosopher-writer concerned.

Co-Sponsored by the PhD Program in French and the PhD Program in Art History

Martin Segal Theatre