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Fall 2011

Friday, September 23, 2011: New Student Orientation.

Monday, October 3, 2011: "Gade nan mizè-a m tonbe: Vodou and Haiti’s Environmental Catastrophe," a talk by Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert. 7pm.

Tuesday, October 18, 2011:
"Artists & Writers," a talk with Mary Ann Caws and Linda Nochin (Art History, Institute of Fine Art, NYU). 7pm.

Monday, October 31, 2011: Poetry Without Borders, a poetry roundtable with Christine Planté, Jean-Patrice Courtois, and Professors Marlène Barsoum and Mary Ann Caws. 6:30pm.

Tuesday, November 15, 2011:
"Artists & Writers," a talk with artist Deborah Kass and scholar Nancy K. Miller. 4pm.

Friday, November 18, 2011: "New Directions in Medieval Scholarship," a roundtable with Chritina Christoforatou, Jay Gates, Oscar Martin, and Warren Woodfin. 2pm.

Friday, November 18, 2011: "Le « je » épistolier," une conférence par Geneviève Haroche-Bouzinac. 5pm.

Tuesday, January 242011: "Fashioning Modernism: Rimbaud meets Verlaine meets Debussy," a seminar with Professor Evelyne Ender and James Melo. 5:30-7:30pm.

 

Event Descriptions


Friday, September 23, 2011

New Student Orientation

3pm: New Student Orientation

4:00pm: Reception with all students and faculty.

Room 4202 

Monday, October 3, 2011

Gade nan mizè-a m tonbe: Vodou and Haiti’s Environmental Catastrophe," a talk by Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert cosponsored by the Caribbean Epistemologies Seminar and the Center for the Humanities.

In “Gade nan mizè-a m tonbe,” a plaintive Vodou song dedicated to the lwa Bwa Nan Bwa (Tree in the Woods spirit), the singer asks the spirit to look at the misery into which he has fallen. Guided by this poignant song, Paravisini-Gebert’s talk explores what the nation’s severe deforestation—and the loss of its sacred mapous—has meant for religious practices and beliefs in Haiti.

Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert is a Professor of Caribbean culture and literature in the Department of Hispanic Studies and Director of the Environmental Studies Program at Vassar College, where she holds the Randolph Distinguished Professor Chair. She is also a participating faculty member in the Programs in Latin American Studies and International Studies.

This event is cosponsored by the Caribbean Epistemologies Seminar and the Center for the Humanities. It is part of the City SEEDS Lecture Series “Aesthetic and Cultural Expressions of African-Derived Religions.” For more information on the event and the Lecture Series, please see the full schedule at the Trans-Caribbean Reflections website.

7pm-9pm, Room 4202
 

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Artists & Writers

This series of conversations will bring together noted artists, writers and scholars to explore form, process, and inspiration in literary and visual creation. Each pair will engage in dialogue about the overlaps and singularities of their respective practices, opening channels of thought across disciplines.

Join distinguished scholars Mary Ann Caws (Comparative Literature, English, and French, The Graduate Center, CUNY) and Linda Nochlin (Art History, Institute of Fine Art, NYU) as they discuss a life in the study of arts and letters. Pioneering thinkers in surrealist literature and feminist art history, they will speak of their own development as scholars, the practice of writing and research, and the role of interdisciplinary reflection in their own groundbreaking work.

7pm, The Skylight Room (9100)

 

Monday, October 31, 2011

Poetry Without Borders, a poetry roundtable organized by the French Ph.D. Program at CUNY Graduate Center with the support of the Institut Henri Peyre.

With the participation of Professors Marlène Barsoum (Associate Professor, Hunter College) and Mary Ann Caws (Distinguished Professor, CUNY Graduate Center),  Jean-Patrice Courtois  (poet, essayist, and maître de conférence at Paris VII), and Christine Planté (Professor, Lyon II, specialist in literature and gender, author of La petite soeur de Balzac). Professor Peter Consenstein (CUNY Graduate Center, Executive Officer of the Ph.D. Program in French) will lead the discussion and Professor Evelyne Ender will introduce the event.

The event will be preceded by a reading by Jean-Patrice Courtois from his most recent volume of poetry Jungles Plates. Presentations will be in French and discussion in English and French. A reception will follow.

6:30pm-8:30pm, Room 4202
 

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Artists & Writers

This series of conversations will bring together noted artists, writers and scholars to explore form, process, and inspiration in literary and visual creation. Each pair will engage in dialogue about the overlaps and singularities of their respective practices, opening channels of thought across disciplines.

Join artist Deborah Kass and scholar Nancy K. Miller (English and Comparative Literature, CUNY Graduate Center) for a dialogue about the correspondences between their work. Known for her canny appropriations of modern art history, Kass’s paintings critique how the intersection of high and low culture can map identity. Through her range of scholarship from feminist criticism, trauma theory and memoir, Miller’s thinking engages the self through a notion of history as composed of private lives and public testimony.

4pm, Presidential Conference Room (8201)
 

Friday, November 18, 2011

New Directions in Medieval Scholarship

A fourth annual medival studies roundtable on new directions in medieval scholarship, featuring:

Christina Christoforatou, Baruch College, English 
(Desire and sexuality in later Byzantine fiction)

Jay Gates, John Jay College, English
(Reading Anglo-Saxon & Old Norse secular law through monastic models)

Oscar Martin, Lehman College, Languages & Literatures
(Heroic traditions in medieval Spain)

Warren Woodfin, Queens College 
(Art History Art & archaeology of later Byzantium)

Francesca Canadé Sautman, moderator

2pm, Pearl Kibre Medieval Study
 

Friday, November 18, 2011

Le « je » épistolier, une conférence par Geneviève Haroche-Bouzinac

Geneviève Haroche-Bouzinac est  professeure  à l’Université d’Orléans, directrice de la revue L’Épistolaire et auteure de Voltaire dans ses lettres de jeunesse, 1711-1733: La formation d'un épistolier au XVIIIe siècle (Paris : Klincksieck, 1992).

À partir de quelques distinctions établies entre le « je » épistolaire et celui d’autres formes non frictionnelles (mémoires et journal personnel), professeure Haroche-Bouzinac évoquera les différents modes d’accès à la première personne dans la lettre. La place du destinataire sera également envisagée et dans la conclusion il sera question d’évoquer les éléments de différences entre les lettres authentiques et les lettres de fiction.

5pm, Room 4202

 

Tuesday, January 24, 2011

"Fashioning Modernism: Rimbaud meets Verlaine meets Debussy," a seminar with Professor Evelyne Ender and James Melo.

The encounter between the adolescent Arthur Rimbaud (1854-1891) and the already celebrated poet Paul Verlaine (1844-1896) was like a spark that ignited an explosion leading to the birth of modern poetry. In a span of only four years, from when he was 17 years old until he abandoned poetry at age 21, Rimbaud changed forever the nature of poetry. His love affair with Verlaine, a tragic and self-destructive relationship on both sides, will be examined in the context of poetic, literary, and musical developments in France in the late 19th century, particularly the culture of decadence and aestheticism. Debussy’s music, which by the composer’s own assessment was profoundly indebted to the aesthetics of Verlaine’s exceptionally musical poetry, will be discussed in relation to its own groundbreaking characteristics and its contribution to musical modernism.

Evelyne Ender is currently Professor of French and of Comparative Literature at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center. She is also appointed in the Women’s Studies program. She is the author of Sexing the Mind: Nineteenth-Century Fictions of Hysteria(1995) and Architexts of Memory: Literature, Science, and Autobiography (2006 Winner of the Scaglione Prize in Comparative Literary Studies). From her training at the University of Geneva, where she obtained her doctorat ès lettres, she has retained a lasting interest in the connections between literature and a history of mentalities. She has published widely in French and in English in the areas of poetics, narrative, gender, and memory studies, and on such authors as Nerval, George Sand, Proust, H. James, and Woolf. She is working on two books: one on the art of reading and the meaning of literary studies for contemporary culture, and the other on changing paradigms of writing and issues of creativity. She spoke at the recent MLA on George Sand and Chopin – on music and text and issues of romantic aesthetics.

James Melo has written extensively for scholarly journals and music magazines in Brazil, Uruguay, Austria, and the United States, and has been invited to participate as a panel discussant in conferences in Indiana, New York, and Canada. He has written program notes for several concerts at Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center, and for over 60 recordings on the Chesky, Naxos, Paulus, and Musikus labels, among others. He is the New York correspondent for the magazine Sinfonica in Uruguay, reviewer of music iconography for the journal Music in Art, and senior editor at RILM (Répertoire International de Littérature Musicale) at CUNY. In March 2005, he chaired a session in the conference Music’s Intellectual History, organized by the Barry Brook Center for Music Research and Documentation (CUNY), and presented a paper on the history of musicological research in Brazil. He received a grant from the Paul Sacher Stiftung in Basel, Switzerland, where he conducted research on the manuscripts of Anton Webern. Mr. Melo is the program annotator for the recording of Villa-Lobos’s complete piano music and Camargo Guarnieri’s complete piano concertos on Naxos. He has written program notes for all of ERC’s original productions and authored several scripts. In 2006, Mr. Melo began collaborating with the Montréal Chamber Music Festival as musicologist and program notes writer. In March 2008 he chaired a session on music iconography in Brazil and Portugal in the conference Music, Body, and Stage: The Iconography of Music Theater and Opera at CUNY Graduate Center.

5:30-7:30pm, The Skylight Room (9100)