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Fall 2012

Friday, November 2nd: Rousseau and the Great Thinkers, a 2-day Rousseau Conference to continue on Saturday, November 3rd at New York University. 9:00am - 6:30pm, The Skylight Room (9100).

Friday, October 26: The Comparative Literature Colloquium Series presents: Cathy Caruth: "Disappearing History: Scenes of Trauma in the Theater of Human Rights" (A Reading of Ariel Dorfman’s Death and the Maiden), with an introduction by Michiko Shimokobe, translator and professor at Seikei University (Japan). 4:30pm, The Skylight Room (9100).

Friday, October 5th: The Parsley Massacre: Assessment & Representation 75 Years Later. Panelists: Michele Wucker (World Policy Institute); Kaiama L. Glover (Barnard College, Columbia University); Maja Horn (Barnard College, Columbia University); Francois Pierre-Louis (Queens College & Graduate Center). Friday, October 5. Room C-197, 4pm. Organized by Jerry Carlson.

Event Descriptions

 

Friday, November 2nd: Rousseau and the Great Thinkers: Benjamin R. Barber, David Bates, Bryan Garsten, Jonathan Israel, Anthony La Vopa, James Miller, Helena Rosenblatt, Jerrold Seigel, David Sorkin, Barbara Taylor, Richard Tuck, Maurizio Viroli. Join us for this 2-day Rousseau Conference, which continues on Saturday November 3rd at New York University. For a full schedule of the 2-day conference please click here. 9:00am - 6:30pm | Conference | The Skylight Room (9100). 

What is Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Place in the Western Political Tradition? This conference will commemorate the tercentenary of Rousseau’s birth and the 250th anniversary of two of his most important writings on politics and morals: On the Social Contract and Emile, both originally published in 1762. Internationally renowned scholars from the US and Europe will discuss his enduring stature and legacy through a comparison with other great thinkers including Machiavelli, Montaigne, Moses Mendelssohn, Mary Wollstonecraft, Edmund Burke and Karl Marx. Join us for a series of public talks on the great thinkers, to be followed by a second day of talks at New York University on November 3.


Friday, October 26: The Comparative Literature Colloquium Series presents Cathy Caruth: "Disappearing History: Scenes of Trauma in the Theater of Human Rights" (A Reading of Ariel Dorfman’s Death and the Maiden), with an introduction by Michiko Shimokobe, translator and professor at Seikei University (Japan). 4:30pm in the Skylight Room (9100). Discussion to be followed by a reception.



Friday, October 5th: The Parsley Massacre: Assessment & Representation 75 Years Later.

In early October 1937 the Dominican Dictator Raphael Trujillo ordered an ethnic cleansing of Haitians along the border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic marked by the Massacre River. The murderers identified their targets as Haitians by an inability to pronounce properly the Spanish word perejil for parsley. Historians estimate that 15,000 to 30,000 victims perished. As news leaked, international concern followed. The Dictator denied the gravity and intent of the events. The approaching clouds of the World War II soon darkened memory of what happened to poor people in an obscure place. Even so, the events of the extermination campaign have long stained relations between the countries.

In memory of the victims, our panel explores how the events have been represented, remembered, and interpreted by Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and artists from both cultures. The issues are particularly pertinent because, in transnational diasporic terms, New York City is the second largest city of both Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

Panel organizer & moderator: Jerry W. Carlson (The City College & Graduate Center). Panelists: Michele Wucker (World Policy Institute); Kaiama L. Glover (Barnard College, Columbia University); Maja Horn (Barnard College, Columbia University); Francois Pierre-Louis (Queens College & Graduate Center). Friday, October 5. Room C-197, 4pm.

Sponsored by the Doctoral Program in French, the Bildner Center for Western Hemispheric Studies, the Dominican Studies Institute, and the MA in the Study of the Americas of the City University of New York.