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Fall 2014

THREE-CREDITS

SPAN 70200 – Spanish Literary Theory
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Fiol-Matta, [25243]
 
SPAN 72900 – Spanish in Social Context
GC: Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Otheguy, [25247]
(cross-listed with LING 79500)
 
SPAN 78400 – Rereading the Three Percent: Translating Latin America and its Literature
GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Pollack, [25246]
 
SPAN 80000 – Language Policy & Planning
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. del Valle, [25244]
(cross-listed with LING 79400)
 
SPAN 80100 – Language and Identity
GC: Thursday, 11:45-1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Cutler, [25252]
(cross-listed with LING 79300)
 
SPAN 82000 – Introduction to Renaissance Studies: Cultural Exchanges in the Renaissance
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Schwartz, [25242]           
(cross-listed with RSCP 72100)
 
SPAN 87000 – Contemporary Spanish and Mexican Cinema and Television
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Smith, [25245]
 
SPAN 87100 – Raiding the Archive: Strategies from the Latin American Narrative Tradition
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Riobó, [25248]
 
SPAN 87100 – The Colonial Stage: Performing History, Love & Gender
GC: Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Chang-Rodríguez, [25241]
 
SPAN 87200 – Ethics, Aesthetics & Historical Memory of the Spanish Civil War
GC: Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Ballesteros, [25249]

ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS

SPAN 80100 – Shifting Language Ideologies & Linguistic Authority in Contemporary Catalonia
GC: Monday, 10/20/2014 – Friday, 10/24/2014, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 1 credit, Prof. Woolard, [25250]    
(Rodoreda Chair) [mini-course, 10 hours]

 
SPAN 87000 – De la desmemoria al pasado omnipresente en la narrativa vasca actual
GC: Monday, 10/6/2014 – Friday, 10/10/2014, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 1 credit, Inaki Aldekoa/ Mari Jose Olaziregi, [25251]      
(Atxaga Chair) [mini-course, 10 hours]
 

Course Descriptions

THREE-CREDITS

SPAN 70200 – Spanish Literary Theory
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Fiol-Matta, [25243]
This seminar will provide an introduction to literary theory in an interdisciplinary context. We will discuss its beginnings in classical texts, to main trends in twentieth century thought hailing from formalism, structuralism and post-structuralism, psychoanalysis, Marxism, and feminism, to minoritarian theories (sometimes referred to as "studies") that seek to unravel traditional approaches' blind spots in counterpoint to their insights (postcolonial, queer, gender, disability, performance, and sound studies, among them). We will consider the changing status of literary studies, arguing for literature’s continued centrality to thought while situating literature in its interconnectedness with other arts and disciplines, assuming literature’s historicity, particularity, and cultural leanings. Reference to Latin American and Spanish authors and critics will constitute a fundamental part of the discussion. This course will be conducted in Spanish.
 
SPAN 72900 – Spanish in Social Context
GC: Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Otheguy, [25247]
(cross-listed with LING 79500)
The course will address issues of Spanish as seen from the point of view of the sociolinguistics of language and the sociolinguistics of society (or, as these two approaches are also known, variationist sociolinguistics and the sociology of language). Under the first approach, we will study variable features of Spanish phonology and morphosyntax, as these are conditioned by external factors (personal and socio-demographic) and internal factors (morphosyntactic and communicative). We will also consider some of the classic issues of Latin American and Peninsular dialectology. Under the second approach, we will ask the root sociology-of-language question, that is, who speaks what to whom where and for what purposes, as it applies to Spanish-speaking settings in Latin America, the Peninsula, and the Hispanic communities of the United States. Classes will be conducted in Spanish (but questions can be asked, and will be answered, in English). Some readings will be in Spanish, others in English. Exams and papers are written in Spanish or English, according to the student’s choice.
 
SPAN 78400 – Rereading the Three Percent: Translating Latin America and its Literature
GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Pollack, [25246]
As Susan Bassnett and André Lefevere have contended since the 1990s, translation not only constitutes a creative act of transmutation, bringing texts into a new language, but also facilitates and mediates the process through which cultures negotiate and construct each other. This course seeks to straddle the space between literary and cultural translation by examining representative moments in the history of the translation of Latin American narrative into English in the United States. As every year roughly three percent of all new works of literature are translations from all languages, the conditions of possibility of Latin American books in English are defined by very specific cultural, economic and political factors. We will examine the selection, translation, dissemination, and/or reception of particular works including Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude, Roberto Bolaño’s The Savage Detectives and 2666, and Daniel Sada’s Almost Never and seek to trace the networks of actors and institutions involved in these processes. These translation “situations” will be examined in conjunction with theoretical approaches on the constitution of the literary field in relationship to translation through the reading of selections by Jacques Rancière, Pierre Bourdieu, Pascale Casanova, Gayatri Spivak and Bruno Latour, as well as critical analyses by scholars and translators such as Mariano Siskind, Emily Apter, Sylvia Molloy, Gregory Rabassa, María Eugenia Mudrovcic. This course will be conducted in Spanish and English.
 
SPAN 80000 – Language Policy & Planning
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. del Valle, [25244]
(cross-listed with LING 79400)
This course will offer an overview of both modernist and critical approaches to language policy and planning (LPP).  While the former deal with LPP mainly as resource management, the latter focus on the discursive and ideological dimensions of both LPP and its academic treatment.  The course will be structured around three major topics:  language standardization, linguistic minorities and language spread. This course will be conducted in English.
 
SPAN 80100 – Language and Identity
GC: Thursday, 11:45-1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Cutler, [25252]
(cross-listed with LING 79300)
This course examines the role of language in the construction of social identity, with a special focus on Latino identities in the US. How much agency do people have in choosing and projecting their gender, sexual, racial, ethnic, class, and identities through linguistic, discursive, and other semiotic devices in interaction? How do individuals linguistically and discursively contest the ways in which they are imagined, defined and labeled by others? By the semester’s end, students will gain an understanding of the different ways in which to consider the role of language in identity construction and develop their own ideas for continuing research in this area. This course will be conducted in English.
 
SPAN 82000 – Introduction to Renaissance Studies: Cultural Exchanges in the Renaissance
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Schwartz, [25242]           
(cross-listed with RSCP 72100)
TBA
 
SPAN 87000 – Contemporary Spanish and Mexican Cinema and Television
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Smith, [25245]
This course, which is taught in English and requires no knowledge of Spanish, compares and contrasts Spanish and Mexican cinema and television of the last three decades. The course will address four topics in film: the replaying of history, cinematic genres and auteurism, gender and sexuality, and nationality and transnationalism; and will further study aspects of television fiction. Feature films will be viewed in subtitled versions and English-language synopses will be provided of TV episodes. Methodology will embrace analysis of the audiovisual industry, film form, and theory. Grading is by written exam (25%), student oral participation and presentation (25%) and final paper (50%). This course will be conducted in English.
 
SPAN 87100 – Raiding the Archive: Strategies from the Latin American Narrative Tradition
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Riobó, [25248]
This course analyzes major theories of the archive (by Foucault, Derrida, Guillory,  González Echevarría, and those relating to biological and digital media—by Žižek, Lanier, and applications of Badiou) in order to understand how the archive figures in twentieth-century Latin American narrative. We will first examine passages from canonical works such as Gómez de Avellaneda’s Sab, Rivera’s La vorágine, Gallegos’s Doña Bárbara, and García Márquez’s Cien años de soledad to understand the major intertexts embedded in our main corpus. We will then study eclectic notions of the archive as both repository and threat, in our main corpus of texts: we will explore archival dangers in Carlos Fuentes’s Aura, Sarduy’s Colibrí, and Borges’s “La biblioteca de babel” and “El idioma analítico de John Wilkins”; we will investigate the archive of memory in Bolaño’s Nocturno de Chile, Arenas’s Antes que anochezca, and Padura Fuentes’s Adiós, Hemingway; and we will examine writing as punishment in the archive in Puig’s El beso de la mujer araña and Sarduy’s Maitreya. Taught in Spanish.
 
SPAN 87100 – The Colonial Stage: Performing History, Love & Gender
GC: Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Chang-Rodríguez, [25241]
Theater was for many decades one of the few means of massive communication in colonial Spanish America. This course will examine diverse theatrical practices through the analysis of key plays from America, Spain and the indigenous traditions (missionary theater, Quechua representations).  Readings will include a selection of texts by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Juan Ruiz de Alarcón, Calderón de la Barca, and Juan Pérez de Montalbán, Francisco del Castillo as well as representative works influenced by the Nahuatl and Quechua traditions. Plays will be grouped around a number of themes: 1) cross-cultural communication; 2) the encounter and its impact; 3) sacred and profane love; 4) the criollo gaze, 5) gender issues. Class discussions will be illustrated with visual materials and communication facilitated through Blackboard.  There will be ample time for discussion and individual research. Among the general requirements are: Informed class participation (English, Spanish); team-work and oral reports; Mid-term exam; short papers (written in English, Spanish or Portuguese following MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers,7th ed.). The specific critical bibliography will be distributed in class. Taught in Spanish.
Texts to be purchased:
Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Los empeños de una casa (Cátedra)
Calderón de la Barca, La aurora en Copacabana (Támesis)
Juan Pérez de Montalbán,  La monja alférez (Juan de la Cuesta Hispanic Monographs)
Juan Ruiz de Alarcón, La verdad sospechosa (Cátedra or Josa’s ed. in Cervantes Virtual)
Other texts will be scanned and distributed in PDF format/or placed on reserve.
 
SPAN 87200 – Ethics, Aesthetics & Historical Memory of the Spanish Civil War
GC: Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Ballesteros, [25249]
This course offers a multidisciplinary study of the ideologies and aesthetics of the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and explores the political and ethic commitment of both Spanish and foreign intellectuals and artists during the war years and after. The first part of the course will focus on the artistic and cultural production created during the years of the war and in exile. Primary sources of study include literary, filmic, and visual arts works by Rafael Alberti, Max Aub, César Vallejo, Pablo Neruda, María Teresa León, André Malraux, George Orwell, Langston Hughes, Pablo Picasso, Robert Cappa, Agustí Centelles, Francisco Ayala, Mercè Rodoreda, and Jomí García Ascot. The second part of the course will focus on recent configurations of the war from the transition to democracy to the present. Coinciding with the excavations of the Spanish Civil War’s mass graves that began in 2000 and the subsequent approval of the Ley de la Memoria Histórica (Law of Historical Memory) in 2007, cultural production has played a crucial role in the construction and dissemination of “spaces of memory” of the war that intend to compensate for the willed amnesia that characterized both the Franco dictatorship and the transition years. We will study a selection of “memorialist” and “postmemorialist” literary and filmic texts that counteract the past’s politics of forgetting, affecting public opinion more effectively than legal processes, and contributing to the creation of collective and institutional memory. Primary sources include texts by Basilio Martín Patino, Ken Loach, Javier Cercas, Dulce Chacón, Jaime Camino, and Patricia Ferreira. Critical analysis of the texts will be situated within a larger global tendency and studied throughout a variety of historical and cultural theories by Aguilar, Freud, Nietzsche, Nora, Adorno, Rousso, LaCapra, Habermas, Huyssen, Boym, Sontag, Butler, Hirsch, among others. The course will be conducted in Spanish but students may participate in class and write their papers in English.
 
ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS

SPAN 80100 – Shifting Language Ideologies & Linguistic Authority in Contemporary Catalonia
GC: Monday, 10/20/2014 – Friday, 10/24/2014, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 1 credit, Prof. Woolard, [25250]
(Rodoreda Chair) [mini-course, 10 hours]
What makes a language authoritative in community members' eyes and ears, allowing institutions to assume legitimacy and speakers to command and convince an audience?  This course will consider alternative ideological foundations of linguistic authority and will examine ongoing shifts in the grounding of such authority in late-modern Catalonia. This course will be conducted in English.
 
SPAN 87000 – De la desmemoria al pasado omnipresente en la narrativa vasca actual  
GC: Monday, 10/6/2014 – Friday, 10/10/2014, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 1 credit,
Inaki Aldekoa/ Mari Jose Olaziregi, [25251]
(Atxaga Chair) [mini-course, 10 hours]
El objetivo del presente curso será el de analizar la función que la rememoración del pasado ha tenido en la literatura vasca de las últimas cuatro décadas. Se tratará, en concreto, de profundizar en la evolución que la literatura vasca ha tenido de propuestas que rememoraban un pasado mítico en la década de los 1980, a propuestas en las que nuestro pasado político conflictivo reciente ha cobrado un protagonismo casi absoluto. El programa comenzará recalando en la heterodoxia cultural que inundó la creación artística vasca de los años 1960, época en la que el ensayo Quousque tandem! (1963) del escultor Jorge Oteiza, o el poemario Harri eta Herri (1964) de Gabriel Aresti establecieron un diálogo entre vanguardia y literatura oral, fuera ésta tradicional o no, como, el bertsolarismo (improvisación oral de versos rimados).  Serán, precisamente, algunas de leyendas tradicionales transmitidas oralmente las que servirán para construir, con técnicas próximas al realismo mágico sudamericano, los mundos imaginarios que inundaron los relatos de los años 1980 de autores como Atxaga, Lertxundi, o Mujika Iraola , mundos imaginarios como Obaba, que sirvieron para dar voz a ese Otro, periférico y silenciado, que hasta la llegada de los románticos no existió en el canon literario de occidente. La excelente acogida  que Obabakoak (1988) de Atxaga tuvo a nivel internacional y su canonización/asimilación  al sistema interliterario ibérico, también nos permitirá reflexionar sobre las expectativas y el lugar que la crítica internacional otorgó a la obra vasca. Reflexionaremos, a su vez, sobre las posibilidades que una literatura minoritaria como la vasca ha tenido y tiene para hacerse un hueco en la denominada República Mundial de las Letras. El debate sobre las tensiones que la especificidad cultural (escritores en lengua vasca, traducciones,  universalismo) genera y ha generado en nuestro sistema literario vasco nos servirá de preámbulo para analizar la actual polémica sobre qué temas y estilos debe “exportar” nuestra literatura para encontrar su lugar en el marco global. Al diálogo sobre la función social y ética que tiene la literatura en un entorno políticamente conflictivo como el vasco, se le superpone el actual debate impulsado por autores como Iban Zaldua, Harkaitz Cano o Eider Rodriguez sobre la oportunidad que la literatura vasca tiene de “exportar” la abundante y novedosa creación literaria que rememora y se nutre de nuestro pasado político más reciente. El boom de novelas y películas sobre la Guerra Civil, o sobre el terrorismo de ETA en las dos últimas décadas, la pervivencia y actualización de lugares de la memoria como Gernika o los denominados “gudaris” (soldados vascos) por medio de canciones versionadas, serán algunas de las cuestiones que nos servirán de introducción para comentar la narrativa de autores vascos actuales como Ramón Saizarbitoria, Arantxa Urretabizkaia, o Kirmen Uribe. This course will be conducted in Spanish.