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Fall 2017

PH.D. PROGRAM IN HISPANIC AND LUSO-BRAZILIAN LITERATURES AND LANGUAGES
FALL 2017 – COURSE LISTINGS
THREE-CREDITS
 
SPAN 70200 – Spanish Literary Theory
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Degiovanni, [36174]
 
SPAN 80100 – Language Ideologies & Practices
GC: Thursday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Makihara, [36176]
 
SPAN 80200 – Critical Pedagogy & Language Learning
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Lado, [36178]
 
SPAN 85000 – Contagious Affectivity: Body-Affect in Gombrowicz
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Dapía, [36172]
 
SPAN 87000 – Race, Ethnicity, Immigration & Diaspora in Contemporary Spanish Culture
GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. Ballesteros, [36173]
 
SPAN 87100 – Mexican Narcoimaginaries: State Power & Cultural Mediations of the Drug Trade
GC: Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. Zavala, [36175]
 
SPAN 87400 – Jose Martí en dos mundos
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Allen, [36179]
 
SPAN 86300 - Theatre and Society: Transatlantic Theatre and Performance: Golden Age Spain and Pre-Conquest/Colonial Latin America  
GC: Wednesdays, 2:00pm to 4:00pm, Prof. Graham-Jones [36773]


 
ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS
 
SPAN 80200 Catalan Sociolinguistics from the Schools:  Language Competence, Use and Identity
GC: October 10 - 13, 2017; 11:00 - 1:30pm., 1 credit, Prof. Llorenç Comajoan [36810]

SPAN 87200 El cine Vasco: inventio, dispositio y elocutio de una cinematografía emergente
GC: October 23-27, 2017; 11:30 - 1:30pm., 1 credit, Prof. Santos Zunzunegui [36811]


 
SEE ALSO
 
SPAN 88800 – Dissertation Seminar
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 0 credit, Prof. Riobó, [36177]


FALL 2017 – COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
THREE-CREDITS
 
SPAN 70200 – Spanish Literary Theory
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Degiovanni, [36174]
 
SPAN 80100 – Language Ideologies & Practices
GC: Thursday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Makihara, [36176]
 
Studies of language in its sociocultural context highlight the role of language ideologies and cultural conceptions of language in reproducing and transforming social dynamics and power relations as well as language use and structure. In this seminar, we will explore linguistic anthropological and other theoretical frameworks and case studies to examine the relationship between language ideologies and social processes and their linguistic and social consequences. The topics considered include modern linguistics, colonialism, missionization, nationalism, globalization, citizenship, identity formation, indigenous movements, sociolinguistic hierarchies, racialization, language standardization, shift and revitalization. We will also examine different research traditions, theoretical issues, and data sources and collection methods, and how they relate to the understanding of language ideologies and language use and structure.
 
SPAN 80200 – Critical Pedagogy & Language Learning
GC: Tuesday, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Prof. Lado, [36178]
 
This course provides students with a solid foundation in critical pedagogy in relation to the teaching of foreign, L2..Ln, local, and heritage languages. The course includes a historical overview of the field and its current place within Applied Linguistics and Language Teaching.
 
Students will examine how language teaching and testing often reproduce ideologies, politics, and social hierarchies, and will discuss classroom strategies to resist these practices. An important part of the course will be devoted to create teaching materials (syllabi, lesson plans, tests,..) that help teachers and learners understand the socio-cultural, political, and ideological dimensions of language, and make them more sensitive to social justice issues.
 
SPAN 85000 – Contagious Affectivity: Body-Affect in Gombrowicz
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Dapía, [36172]

In an interview Aernout Mik, a contemporary artist, internationally known for his installations and films, referring to his interest in Gombrowicz, says: “What appeals most strongly to me about Gombrowicz, and what became a very active force in my work is what might be called a ‘traveling’ from one object or person to the other through connections that are created almost by accident. This also happens in my work when the camera travels from body parts to objects and objects to other objects or when people assume each other's compulsive movements and emotions. There is an action of contamination or spreading out that becomes an independent force.” It is precisely this “contamination” or transmission of affect/emotion as it operates in Gombrowicz’s work that constitutes the subject of this course. In the first half of the course we will explore work in affect theory by Sara Ahmed, Lauren Berlant, Teresa Brennan, Gilles Deleuze, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Ruth Leys, Brian Massumi, William Ian Miller, Sianne Ngai, and Elspeth Probyn. In the second half we will discuss selected works by Gombrowicz such as Bacacay, Ferdydurke, Trans-Atlantyk, Pornographia, The Marriage. Particular attention will be given to the way in which his work performs nationalist emotions (such as patriotism), humiliation, shame, embarrassment, queer feelings, and disgust
 
SPAN 87000 – Race, Ethnicity, Immigration & Diaspora in Contemporary Spanish Culture
GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. Ballesteros, [36173]
 
This course studies the representation of immigrants and diasporic subjects, and of xenophobia and racism towards ethnic and racial minorities in contemporary Spanish culture.
 
It provides an overview of cultural theories on Racism, Xenophobia and National Identity, and an examination of a variety of literary and filmic texts by both Spanish and Afro-Iberian writers and filmmakers, paying special attention to the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality and class.
 
Primary authors included in the course are: Juan Goytisolo, Sami Nair, Najat El- Hachmi, Eduardo Mendicutti, Ignacio del Moral, Donato NDongo, Inongo Vi Makomé, Montxo Armendáriz, Iciar Bollain, Carmen Cardona, Helena Taberna, Chus Gutiérrez, Gerardo Olivares, Alberto Rodríguez.
 
 
SPAN 87100 – Mexican Narcoimaginaries: State Power & Cultural Mediations of the Drug Trade
GC: Wednesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. Zavala, [36175]
 
The present course will explore the political dimension of what is known as narco in the last two decades of cultural productions mediated by hegemonic discourses on organized crime. We will trace the recent history of literary works, cinema, television, conceptual art and music as they either reproduce or resist such hegemonic discourse on drug trafficking. For such a purpose, we will examine cultural objects produced in the 1990s and 2000s through an interdisciplinary theoretical framework drawing from the works of Pierre Bourdieu, Alain Badiou, Michel Foucault, Jacques Rancière, Carl Schmitt, Ernesto Laclau, Chantal Mouffe, Antonio Gramsci, and Antoine Compagnon, among others. We will incorporate as well the most updated work by key sociologists, journalists and literary critics studying the phenomenon of the drug trade, including Luis Astorga, Fernando Escalante Gonzalbo, Dawn Paley, Carlos Montemayor, Charles Bowden, Terrence Poppa and Gary Webb. Beyond the recurrent mythical aspects of narconarratives, we will approach the intersection of culture, state power, hegemonic discourses and the geopolitics of organized crime. This course will be conducted in Spanish. 
 
SPAN 87400 – Jose Martí en dos mundos
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Allen, [36179]
 
Which works are translated, why and how are they translated, and what is the impact of their translation? These questions thread through both the theoretical and practice-oriented branches of translation studies. This course focuses on the work of José Martí—canonical across Latin America but  yet to be widely accorded that status in the United States, where Martí spent most of his adult life—to address all three questions both theoretically and through the practice of translation. As a grounding in the rigorous exegetic and investigative skill translation demands, we begin with a collective translation of several of Martí's extraordinary crónicas, the documentary texts he published in newspapers across the Americas. We will also scrutinize Martí's own practice as a translator, of Victor Hugo's Mes fils and Helen Hunt Jackson's Ramona among other texts, as well as his writings about translation. And we'll assess the history of the translation of Martí's work into English and other languages.  The figure of Martí himself has also been subjected to intra-lingual, interlingual and intersemiotic translations, to adopt Jakobson's three categories, which have varied widely across historical periods and national and ideological contexts.  Viewed in the light of Bourdieu's notion of cultural capital, as elaborated by Pascale Casanova, Martí remains a paradox. Drawing on the analyses of Susana Rotker, Julio Ramos, Oscar Montero, Carlos Ripoll, Antonio José Ponte, Mauricio Font, Rafael Rojas, and others, this course integrates the study of a fundamental transnational figure with that of the transnational practice of translation.

SPAN 86300 - Theatre and Society: Transatlantic Theatre and Performance: Golden Age Spain and Pre-Conquest/Colonial Latin America 
GC: Wednesdays, 2:00pm to 4:00pm; Prof. Jean Graham-Jones [36773]


This course focuses on theatre and performance produced in Spain and Latin America during, primarily, the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Rather than treating Latin America as a colonial extension of the Spanish-speaking metropolis, we will study the two regions through their nearly constant (albeit often conflicted) dialogue with each other. To do this we will discuss, apply, and critique the sociocultural, political, linguistic, literary, theatrical, and performance theories of coloniality. After a transatlantic introduction to the period, we will first look at theatre / performance practices in place in both regions before the arrival of the Spanish to the Americas and then proceed to an examination of Spain's "Golden Age" of theatre as well as colonial theatre and performance in Latin America. We will read autos sacramentales in addition to entremeses and comedias from both sides of the Atlantic; study accounts of Corpus Christi processions in Madrid and Cuzco in addition to reconstructions of pre-Hispanic performance-scripts in Meso-America and Canada; and seek out specific examples of cultural encounter, such as the translation of a Spanish evangelical drama into Nahuatl or a colonial loa intended for a madrileño audience. Among the authors whose texts we will study are Rojas, Lope de Rueda, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Calderón de la Barca, Cervantes, Ruiz de Alarcón, sor Marcela de San Félix, and sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Evaluation will be based on in-class participation, online Blackboard discussions, small-group activities, and a final research paper (15-20 pages).