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Spring 2014

THREE-CREDITS
 
SPAN 70100 Spanish as Historical Problem (History of Spanish)
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 5382, 3 credits, Prof. del Valle, [23276]
 
SPAN 70700 Spanish Applied Linguistics
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 6495, 3 credits, Prof. Lado, [23101] 
(cross-listed with LING 86100)
 
SPAN 78200 – Literary Translation – Theory and Practice – Jose Martí en dos mundos
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Rm. 8203, Prof. Allen, [23278]

SPAN 82200 – The Invention of Love in Early Modern Spanish Poetry
GC: Thursday, 6.30-8.30 p.m., Rm. 4422, 3 credits, Prof. Schwartz, [23279]
 
SPAN 87000 – The City in Contemporary Spanish Literature, Cinema, and Visual Arts
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 4422, 3 credits, Prof. Smith, [23280]
 
SPAN 87100 – Hybrid Textualities:  Words and Photographs in Latin American Writing
GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 5383, 3 credits, Prof. Perkowska, [23281]
 
SPAN 87400 – Latin American Critical Theory
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Rm. 3307, 3 credits, Prof. Degiovanni, [23283]
 
PORT 88100 – Portugal and Spain: 600 Years of Give and Take on Europe's Oldest Border
GC: Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rm. 5383, 3 credits, Prof. Martínez-Torrejón, [23285]

 

ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS
 
SPAN 87200 – En espejo: la narrativa catalana, la castellana y sus tramas secretas. Joan Sales, Maurici Serrahima, Tísner y Juan Benet
GC: Monday, 2/10/14, Tuesday, 2/11/14, Thursday, 2/13/14, Friday, 2/14/14, 1:30-4:00 p.m., Rm. 4116.18, 1 credit,
Prof. Nora Catelli, [23282]
(Rodoreda Chair) (mini-course, 10 hours)

SPAN 87200 – Special Topics in Hispanic Literature
GC: Thur., 5/8/14 & Fri., 5/9/14, 1:00-4:00 p.m. & Sat., 5/10/14 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m., Rm. 4116.18, 1 credit,
Prof. Emilio de Miguel, [24062]
(Delibes Chair) (mini-course, 10 hours)
 
SPAN 87500 – Microcosmopolitismo: vivencias transnacionales de/en las literaturas pequeñas. El espacio literario gallego
GC: Monday, 3/10/14 – Friday, 3/14/14, 2:00-4:00 p.m., Rm. 4116.18, 1 credit, Prof. Cesar Domínguez, [23284]
(Galician Chair) (mini-course, 10 hours)
 
PORT 88100 MULHER ESTRANHA: travel, subject and desire in Early Modern Portuguese literature
GC: Monday, 3/31/2014 – Friday, 4/4/2014, 9:00 – 11:00 am., 1 credit, Rm4116.18, Prof. Helio Alves, [23286]
(Camões Chair) (mini-course, 10 hours)


 

Course Descriptions

THREE-CREDITS

SPAN 70100 – Spanish as Historical Problem (History of Spanish)
GC: Thursday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. del Valle, [23276]
 
“When you read a work of history, always listen out for the buzzing. If you can detect none, either you are tone deaf or your historian is a dull dog” (Edward H. Carr)
“Language is too important historically to leave it to the linguists” (Peter Burke)
Este curso propone una reflexión sobre las distintas aproximaciones a la historia externa e interna del español y sobre las condiciones y estrategias de constitución de su objeto de estudio. Entre ellas se encuentran la “Gramática Histórica del Español”, la “Historia de la Lengua Española”, la “Historia Social del Español” y la “Historia Política del Español”, que, aunque se ocupan de objetos lingüísticos sólo parcialmente coincidentes, los observan sin embargo a través de una misma ventana cronológica que va desde los tiempos en que el latín fue introducido en la Península Ibérica hasta el momento actual, cuando aún la unidad y el significado simbólico del español en el mundo son temas de discusión dentro y fuera de los estudios del lenguaje. Por lo tanto, esta materia se plantea no sólo reproducir la descripción de la historia de la lengua como un proceso de evolución lineal de unidades y sistemas fónicos, morfológicos y sintácticos; no se plantea hacer un recorrido por los hitos culturales y políticos que marcan la cristalización de la lengua; ni se propone tampoco la identificación de fenómenos sociolingüísticos – tales como la variación, el bilingüismo, la diglosia o la estandarización – que inciden sobre la evolución del idioma. La perspectiva aquí adoptada invita a aproximarse críticamente a las disciplinas mismas que configuran como objetos de estudio la emergencia histórica del español como “lengua”, su evolución orgánica y las circunstancias de su propagación por la Península Ibérica y por el continente americano.

The course will be taught in Spanish.


SPAN 70700 – Spanish Applied Linguistics
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Lado, [23101] 
(cross-listed with LING 86100)
 
This course explores factors involved in L2 learning by examining research on the role of internal processes (e.g., noticing, attention, awareness), individual differences (e.g., previous language experience, aptitude, working memory, age, motivation), and their interaction with external factors (e.g., degree of explicitness of the instruction, context/environment of acquisition, input and interaction). Specific questions we will try to answer in the course are: How do individual differences affect developmental rates, processes, and outcomes? To what degree do individual differences affect specific aspects of the L2 acquisition (e.g., syntax vs. vocabulary)? How are the effects of external factors modulated by internal processes and individual differences? What universal features of the L2 learner and L2 learning process determine the nature and route of acquisition? Additionally, this course will briefly explore the role that social dimensions play in L2 learning (e.g., social identity, socio-political and socio-cultural contexts).


SPAN 78200 – Literary Translation – Theory and Practice – Jose Martí en dos mundos
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Allen, [23278]

Which works are translated, why and how are they translated, and what is the impact of their translation? These questions thread through both the theoretical and practice-oriented branches of translation studies. Focused on the work of José Martí, which is canonical across Latin America but has yet to be widely accorded that status in the United States where Martí spent most of his adult life, this course will address all three questions both theoretically and through the practice of translation. We will begin with a collective translation of some of Martí's extraordinary crónicas, the documentary texts he published in newspapers across the Americas, as a grounding in the rigorous exegetic and investigative practices that translation demands. We will scrutinize Martí's own practice as a translator, of Helen Hunt Jackson's Ramona among other texts, for evidence of his theories of translation. And we'll assess the history of the translation of Martí's work into English and other languages.  The figure of Martí himself  has also been subjected to intra-lingual, interlingual and intersemiotic translations, to adopt Jakobson's three categories, which have varied widely in different historical periods and national and ideological contexts.  Viewed in the light of Bourdieu's notion of cultural capital, as elaborated by Pascale Casanova, Martí remains a paradox. Drawing on the analyses of Susana Rotker, Oscar Montero, Carlos Ripoll, Antonio José Ponte, Mauricio Font, Rafael Rojas, and others, this course integrates the study of a fundamental transnational figure with that of the transnational practice of translation.

The course will be taught in Spanish and English. 


SPAN 82200 – The Invention of Love in Early Modern Spanish Poetry
GC: Thursday, 6.30-8.30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Schwartz, [23279]
 
The development of Humanism led to the rediscovery, on the one hand, of Greek and Roman poetry, on the other, of Italian poetry of the Renaissance, which became a main model for different conceptions of love at the times. The example of Petrarch’s Canzoniere and his Italian followers in the sixteenth-century, Bembo, among others, combined with the enthusiastic reception of Neo-Platonism after the translations and writings of Marsilio Ficino, promoted a vision of love that was going to be recreated by Spanish Renaissance and Baroque poets for two long centuries. The purpose of this seminar will be to examine the relations between literary and philosophical theories and their re-contextualization in poetic texts, focusing on the constitution of the voices of the lover and on the portraits of the beloved, as they appear in individual poems and in the collections built as “cancioneros” after the example of Petrarch. Garcilaso’s and Herrera’s works,  historical precedents of Góngora’s and  Quevedo’s poetry will be studied in conjunction with readings of Neo-Platonic theory,  Ficino’s treatises and those composed by his most important mediator in Spain, León Hebreo in the famous translation of Inca Garcilaso de la Vega.

The course will be taught in Spanish.


SPAN 87000 – The City in Contemporary Spanish Literature, Cinema, and Visual Arts
GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Smith, [23280]
 
This course, which is taught in Spanish, examines the modern Spanish city and the representation of urban space in the media of novel (Laforet, Martín Santos, Goytisolo, Tusquets), film and TV (Almodóvar, Alex de la Iglesia, TVE’s Fortunata y Jacinta), and visual art (painter Antonio López, web artist Marisa González). Each class examines an urban theorist (eg Henri Lefebvre, Michel de Certeau, Manuel Castells), a work of criticism by a scholar of Spanish urbanism, and one or more creative works.

Grading is by written exam (25%), student oral participation, weekly web posting and presentation (25%) and final paper (50%). A reader will be available.

The course will be taught in Spanish.


SPAN 87100 – Hybrid Textualities:  Words and Photographs in Latin American Writing
GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Perkowska, [23281]
 
Since the discovery of photography in 1839, and despite its long association with the mechanical reproduction of reality, the photographic image has increasingly assumed the role of participating in or indeed embodying literary projects. This course explores different modalities of interaction between photography and literary texts in contemporary Latin American writing: ekphrastic or thematic inscriptions of photographic images in fiction (Julio Cortázar, Roberto Bolaño, Norah Lange), fiction with photographs (Eduardo Belgrano Rawson, Mario Bellatín), the photographic essay (Diamela Eltit, Eduardo Lalo), the photographic narrative (Susan Meiselas), and the photo-poem (Reina María Rodríguez, Igor Barreto). We will examine these hybrid/intermedial textualities in conjunction with theoretical readings on photography and literature (Roland Barthes, Walter Benjamin, Susan Sontag, W.J.T. Mitchell, Annette Kuhn, Marianne Hirsch, Victor Burgin, John Tagg) that do not view them as antagonistic forms of representation (reality/referentiality vs. fiction/imagination) but rather as related mediums of expression. The crossing of medial boundaries produces an imagetext  (Mitchell), a site of tension, slippage, transformation, displacement or interference, which impugns the notion of a single, fixed meaning and challenges representation, revealing its inescapable heterogeneity.

The course will be taught in Spanish.


SPAN 87400 – Latin American Critical Theory
GC: Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Degiovanni, [23283]
 
This seminar will discuss groundbreaking texts produced by Latin American cultural analysts after the 1970s in order to address a series of theoretical and critical questions—including modernity, colonialism, globalization, and the popular—considered decisive for the definition and transformation of the field of Latin American studies in the last decades. In what will be an inquiry on the politics of academic knowledge in the global theoretical marketplace, we will map the genealogical lines and epistemological crossroads that played a crucial role in the emergence of a number of recent scholarly discourses about Latin America; we will also examine the specific issues and relevant disputes that helped unleash disciplinary shifts vis-à-vis other theoretical and critical paradigms produced in the U.S. and Europe.  The reading list will include texts by Ángel Rama, Antonio Cornejo Polar, Julio Ramos, Néstor García Canclini, Walter Mignolo, Beatriz Sarlo, Román de la Campa, John Beverley, and Alberto Moreiras.  

The course will be taught in Spanish.
 
 
PORT 88100 – Portugal and Spain: 600 Years of Give and Take on Europe's Oldest Border
GC: Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Martínez-Torrejón, [23285]
 
Portugal boasts the de facto oldest, most stable border in Europe. Yet, Portugal and Spain are the the only two countries in the EU that do not have a treaty mutually recognizing their border. This paradox illustrates the identity conundrum this course will explore, as represented by (and for the most part provoked through) literary texts. Taking as departing and arriving points the battle of Aljubarrota (1385) and the admission of Portugal and Spain to the EU (1986), with the near abolition of borders and both countries relinquishing a good part of their independence, this course will explore the politics of nation-building and identity construction in the Iberian Peninsula throughout six hundred years of historiography (Fernão Lopes, Faria e Sousa, Fco Manuel de Melo, Oliveira Martins), epic poetry (Camões, Corterreal, P da Costa), literary and cultural history (Garret, Pidal, Maeztu, A Sardinha, Américo Castro, C Sánchez Albornoz, A Sérgio, Unamuno) poetry (Antero de Quental, Joan Maragall, Pessoa, J Régio) and narrative (J Sena, Torga, Saramago, Sousa Tavares), not forgetting “national” musical genres (fado and copla).

The course will be taught in Spanish.


ONE-CREDIT MINI-SEMINARS
 
SPAN 87200 – En espejo: la narrativa catalana, la castellana y sus tramas secretas. Joan Sales, Maurici Serrahima, Tísner y Juan Benet
GC: Monday, 2/10/14, Tuesday, 2/11/14, Thursday, 2/13/14, Friday, 2/14/14, 1:30-4:00 p.m., 1 credit,
Prof. Nora Catelli, [23282]
(Rodoreda Chair) (mini-course, 10 hours)
 
Los diarios, relatos, memorias y novelas de la guerra civil española en dos lenguas -catalán, castellano- y en el mismo territorio plantean los problemas de un espacio compartido, proyectos políticos y sociales en abierta confrontación y lenguas en un espejo asimétrico. En pocas ocasiones este campo intelectual y literario se lee desde el punto de vista de esa articulación, sus tensiones y sus sistemas de recepción. Los ejes centrales del seminario serán tres: las poéticas de la narrativa de guerra (Joan Sales, Juan Benet) con sus peculiaridades y sus invariantes funcionales; las poéticas de los géneros autobiográficos y sus consecuencias personales y políticas (Maurici Serrahima, Tísner) y, en tercer lugar, una propuesta de tentativas de lectura de la experiencia radical de la guerra y sus modelos formales en el siglo XX. Es posible también, a partir de tales ejes, establecer homologías con otros campos del ámbito hispánico en los que, como consecuencia de la guerra de las Malvinas, surgió una literatura que, necesariamente, retomó de manera orgánica ciertos procedimientos y tradiciones de la narrativa de guerra. Como ejemplo último de esa continuidad puede leerse Los pichiciegos de Fogwill.


SPAN 87500 – Microcosmopolitismo: vivencias transnacionales de/en las literaturas pequeñas. El espacio literario gallego
GC: Monday, 3/10/14 – Friday, 3/14/14, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 1 credit, Prof. Cesar Domínguez, [23284]
(Galician Chair) (mini-course, 10 hours)
 
El seminario pretende conjugar dos vertientes del cosmopolitismo que, por lo general, no se examinan de forma conjunta: la tradicional visión del "ethos" cosmopolita y el cosmopolitismo como modo de circulación literaria. En uno u otro caso, el concepto se asocia a espacios cuya extensión es suficiente como para asegurar una filiación que va más allá de la nación, pues, de no ser así, se interpretaría como una traición. De ahí la identificación kunderiana de las "pequeñas naciones" con las familias y sus pactos de obediencia. En su versión literaria, nos hallaríamos ante las "pequeñas literaturas", que no "literaturas menores". ¿Cuál es la experiencia cosmopolita en las pequeñas literaturas, en las que la celebración del escritor corre paralela a su consideración como escritor "nacional"? ¿Cuáles son las formas de circulación de las pequeñas literaturas? Éstas y otras preguntas se proyectarán sobre el espacio literario gallego, en el que cualquier consideración de las experiencias cosmopolitas pasa por la centralidad de la extraterritorialidad.


PORT 88100 MULHER ESTRANHA: travel, subject and desire in Early Modern Portuguese literature
GC: Monday, 3/31/2014 – Friday, 4/4/2014, 9:00 – 11:00 am., 1 credit, Rm 4116.18, Prof. Helio Alves, [23286]
(Camões Chair) (mini-course, 10 hours)


The peculiar nature of Portuguese history 1415-early 1600s as the first project of global expansion through oceanic travel posits especially relevant issues of subjectivity when faced with the unknown and the
strange. This mini-course will focus on the complexities of desire and estrangement towards women as they appear in some of the outstanding poetry and prose written by men of the period. Beginning with a
unyielding Negress in the first Portuguese journeys to West Africa and ending full-circle with a reluctant White woman shipwrecked in southern Africa, we shall analyze texts where desire and subjectivity are placed
under scrutiny in or before a powerful feminine presence. The readings will also be intertextual in the wide sense, as the points of contact and difference between the poems and narratives will provide a deeper
and more sensitive understanding of each. The authors read will be Gomes Eanes de Zurara, the Count of Matosinhos, Luís de Camões, Fernão Mendes Pinto, Jerónimo Corte-Real and Vasco Mouzinho.

The course will be taught in Portuguese.


SPAN 87200 – Seminar: Special Topics in Hispanic Literature
GC: Thur., 5/8/14 & Fri., 5/9/14, 1:00-4:00 p.m. & Sat., 5/10/14 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m., Rm. 4116.18, 1 credit, Prof. Emilio de Miguel, [24062]
(Delibes Chair) (mini-course, 10 hours)


Con el título ‘Lorca desde el Llanto’, además de la bisemia que se sugiere por el dolor de haber perdido a un escritor de su categoría a una edad tempranísima (38 años) y en circunstancias extremadamente dolorosas, se plantea un acercamiento a los recursos poéticos de Lorca desde la propuesta de que el Llanto por Ignacio Sánchez Mejías es el poema más complejo y elaborado del autor, culminación de todas sus inquietudes artísticas.

Desde ese punto de partida se buscará realizar un análisis y una valoración de la producción dramática y poética de Lorca con el fin de iluminar sus procedimientos creativos y con el propósito de mostrar cómo incluso en sus obras aparentemente más tradicionales (Romancero gitano, Bodas de sangre) hay recursos y planteamientos creativos avanzadísimos, y cómo en las obras aparentemente más vanguardistas (Poeta en Nueva York), hay una absoluta continuidad con sus temas y recursos permanentes.

Se estudiará con los estudiantes casos concretos de poemas del libro Romancero gitano, se analizará la técnica constructiva y el alcance socialde Bodas de sangre para terminar con análisis detallado del Llanto por Ignacio Sánchez Mejías.