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Zaghloul Ahmed
Position: Assistant Professor
Campus Affiliation: College of Staten Island
Phone: 718 982 2980
Degrees/Diplomas: Master and PhD degrees in biology sub program of neuroscience from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York
Research Interests: Manual therapy and neurological rehabilitation

Primary Teaching Areas:
Research, Neuroscience, motor control, advanced physiology and exercises physiology

Selected Publications:

  1. Zaghloul Ahmed and Andrzej Wieraszko, 2006. "Modulation of Learning and Hippocampal, neuronal plasticity by rapid transcanial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)". BioElectroMagnetic vol 27, 4, 288-294.
  2. Mehta M., Ahmed Z., Shawn S., Fernando, Patricia Cano- Sanchez, Tatyana Adayev, Dorota Ziemnicka, Andrzej Wieraszko, and Probal Banerjee, 2007. "Hippocampal Serotonin 1A Receptor Signaling through MAP Kinase Undergoes a Mechanistic and Functional Transition During Neonatal Brain Development. Journal of Neurochemistry, 101(4):918-28.
  3. A.Wieraszko, Z. Ahmed, J. Armani, N. Maqsood, S. Phillips, and H. Raja, 2005.  "Neurophysiological Effects Induced in the Nervous Tissue by Low- Frequency Pulsed Magnetic Fields." The Environmentalist, Vol. 25, 145-155
  4. Ahmed, Z. Wieraszko, A. (2006). The influence of Pulsed Magnetic Fields (PMFs) on the synaptic transmission and on the action potential in the mouse nervous system. Proc.4th Int. Work. On Biological effects of Magnetic Fields, Crete, Greece, pp.430-445
  5. Ahmed Z. and WIERASZKO A, 2004. "A magnetic field- induced increase in excitability of hippocampal neurons mediated by electrical impulses. " Proceeding of Biological Effects of EMFS. Third International Conference.
  6. Ahmed, Z. Wieraszko, A. (2006). The influence of Pulsed Magnetic Fields (PMFs) on the synaptic transmission and on the action potential in the mouse nervous system. Proc.4th Int. Work. On Biological effects of Magnetic Fields, Crete, Greece, pp.430-445

Works in Progress:

We are currently studying a new phenomenon that was found in central axons. That is axons are capable of releasing neurotransmitters at specialized locations throughout the axon. The original finding was discovered in the white matter of the brain. We further the finding by discovering that peripheral nerves –like sciatic nerve – are capable of similar release. We are currently working to reveal the mechanisms controlling this process and its physiological significance.

We are also studying the effect of different patterns of electrical and magnetic field stimulation on modulating the excitability of peripheral nerves in mice. We have discovered that certain pattern of electrical and magnetic pulses – pending patents – can induce long lasting increase or decrease in the amplitude of action potential. These experiments were performed in isolated axons, which indicate that the modulation has occurred at the level of axons and the possible mechanisms for this modulation are located in axons. One of these mechanisms we found to be the reduction of sodium channel density at the node of Ranvier. These exciting finding has profound applications in clinical practice in fields of pain management and neurological rehabilitation. One of these potential applications is to reduce pain and spasticity.

In addition we are working on a third project which is the study of combinatorial treatment of spinal cord stimulation – using TMS (transcranial magnetic stimulation) – and acrobatic exercises on functional recovery after spinal cord contusion lesion in mice. The spinally applied magnetic stimulation induces electrical current that in turn would stimulate the ascending and descending tracts as well as local spinal circuits above below and at the lesion site. That type of stimulation – we hypothesize – will prime the tissue to be more sensitive to changes and therefore response better to acrobatic exercises. Our data showed support for this hypothesis. In the content of this project we also study the characteristics of spastic muscles in spinal cord injured mice. Using electrophysiological studies and myograph we recently found that spastic muscles have a probable deformity at the level of neuromuscular junction. This deformity is probably responsible for the inefficient transmission between the nerve and the muscle fibers, and for the inability of the nerve supplying spastic muscles to transmit higher frequency stimulation. These results support the findings in human that spastic muscles are low and slow activated in response to postural perturbation. Our results provide the mechanistic explanation for such findings in human.       

Our research is aimed to reveal mechanisms that are compromised due to nervous system injuries. We conduct the research on the belief that revealing such key knowledge will facilitate the treatment of people with nervous system problems.

Education:

  • Physical Therapy degree from Cairo University
  • Master and PhD degrees in biology sub program of neuroscience from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York
  • Diploma in osteopathic manual practice from the Canadian College of Osteopathy