Show The Graduate Center Menu
 
 
John Mollenkopf
Position: Distinguished Professor
Campus Affiliation: CUNY Graduate Center
Degrees/Diplomas: PhD Harvard
Research Interests: urban politics, public policy, comparative urbanism
Prof. Mollenkopf teaches Political Science and Sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center and directs its Center for Urban Research. He coordinates the Graduate Center’s urban studies exchange with Humboldt University, Berlin and its interdisciplinary program on public policy and urban studies.  His teaching and research interests focus on urban politics and public policy, including New York City politics, immigrant political participation, and the new immigrant second generation. He has authored or edited fifteen books on urban politics, urban policy, the politics of urban development, and New York City, most recently Bringing Outsiders In:  Transatlantic Perspectives on Immigrant Political Incorporation, edited with Jennifer Hochschild (Cornell University Press, 2009).  His book with Philip Kasinitz, Mary Waters, and Jennifer Holdaway, Inheriting the City: The Children of Immigrants Come of Age (paperback by Russell Sage Foundation, 2010), has won the Distinguished Book Award of the American Sociological Association, the Thomas and Znaniecki Award of the ASA Immigration Section, and the Mirra Komarovsky Award of the Eastern Sociological Society.  Other recent books include The Urban Politics Reader (Routledge, 2006, co-edited with Elizabeth Strom) and Becoming New Yorkers: Ethnographies of the New Second Generation (Russell Sage Foundation, 2004), co-edited with Philip Kasinitz and Mary Waters.  His Place Matters: A Metropolitics for the 21st Century (with Peter Dreier and Todd Swanstrom, University Press of Kansas 2001) won the Michael Harrington Award from the American Political Science Association.  Two earlier books, The Phoenix in the Ashes (Princeton University Press 1994) and The Contested City (Princeton University Press 1983) dissected the persistence of a conservative governing coalition in New York City and the rise of and challenges to pro-growth coalitions in Boston and San Francisco.  He has been a Visiting Professor at the Institute d'Etudes Politique in Paris, Wibaut Chair Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Amsterdam, and a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation. Prior to joining the Graduate Center in 1981, he directed the Economic Development Division of the New York City Department of City Planning and taught urban studies and public management at Stanford University. He was Program Director for Urban Initiatives at the Social Science Research Council, chaired its Committee on New York City, and served on the editorial boards of PS and Urban Affairs Review.  He has also served as a consultant to many government agencies.  Currently he serves on the international advisory boards of the Netherlands Institute of City Innovation Studies and the Bucerius Foundation’s Setting into Motion doctoral program, and the E Pluribus Unum prize selection committee of the Migration Policy Institute.