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Spring 2017

Spring 2017 Course Schedule

Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
11:45am to 1:45pm

Kant on the Freedom & Morality
Benjamin Vilhauer (PT)
PSC 82210
4 Credits
CRN #35579
(Cross list with PHIL 76000)
RM 7395

American Political Development
Ruth O’Brien (AP)
PSC 82210
4 Credits
CRN #35248
RM 8202

Community Based Organization & Public Policy
Hector Cordero-Guzman (PP)
PSC 72500
3 Credits
CRN #35263
(Cross list with SOC 84700)
RM 6114

 

Latin American Politics
Mark Ungar (CP)
PSC 77902
3 Credits
CRN #35256
RM 5212

2:00 to
4:00pm

Writing Politics
Peter Beinart (WP)
PSC 79002
3 Credits
CRN #35244
RM 6300
Minority Politics
Charles Tien (AP)
PSC 82001
4 Credits
CRN #35245
RM 6493
Contractarianism and its Critics
Charles Mills (PT)
PSC 80304
4 Credits
CRN #35580
(Cross list with PHIL 77500)
RM 7395

Dissertation Proposal Workshop
Peter Liberman (G/PD)
PSC 89100
CRN #35250
RM 6300
International Political Economy
Ming Xia (IR)
PSC 76300
3 Credits
CRN #35251
RM 8202

Spinoza
Justin Steinberg (PT)
PSC 80303
4 Credits
CRN #35581
(Cross list with PHIL 76200)
RM 7395

Basic Concepts & Methods in Comparative Politics
Janet Johnson (CP/M)
PSC 77904
3 Credits
CRN #35257
RM 6493

Democratic Theory
John Wallach (PT)
PSC 80402
4 Credits
CRN #35258
RM 7395

4:15 to
6:15pm

Political Theory of Capitalism
Corey Robin (PT)
PSC 80303
4 Credits
CRN #35246
RM 7395

Comparative Political Economy
John Bowman (CP)
PSC 77902
3 Credits
CRN #35252
RM 6493
Public and Social Policy Development, Analysis, and Evaluation
Michael Jacobson (PP)
PSC 72500
3 Credits
CRN # 35657
(Cross list with SOC 84700)
RM 6421

Working Class Politics
John Mollenkopf/Leslie McCall (PP)
PSC 72500
3 Credits
CRN #35254
(Cross list with SOC 84700)
RM 6494

Comparative Foreign Policy
Jacqueline Braveboy-Wagner (IR)
PSC 86105
4 Credits
CRN #35261
RM 5383

Program Events

6:30 to
8:30pm

 

Asian Security
Kosal Path (G)
PSC 76210
3 Credits
CRN #35253
RM 5212

Comparative Politics and Economic Development in Contemporary India
Robert Jenkins (CP)
PSC 87630
4 Credits
CRN #35262
RM 6300

Race and American Public Policy
Michael Fortner (PP)
PSC 72001
3 Credits
CRN #35255
RM 6421

Within National inequalities: from Pareto to Piketty
Branko Milanovic (PP)
PSC 72500
3 Credits
CRN #35574
(Cross list with ECON 81500)
RM 3209

Housing Politics and Policy
Alexander Reichl (PP)
PSC 73202
3 Credits
CRN #35259
RM 6114

Critical Perspectives on African Political Economy
Mojubaolu Olufunke Okome (IR)
PSC 77903
3 Credits
CRN #35249
RM 6493

Congress
David Jones (AP)
PSC 72210
3 Credits
CRN #35260
RM 5212

 

PSC = Political Science    SOC = Sociology       HIS = History
IDS = Interdisciplinary     PHIL = Philosophy     ECON = Economics


Spring 2017 Course Descriptions

 

American Politics


Ruth O’Brien – American Political Development (AP)
PSC 82210 – 4 credits (CRN# 35248)
Monday 11:45am – 1:45pm

Course Description:

American Political Development, more properly titled – Neos, Isms, & Information Imperialism is an American-politics seminar that crosses political science disciplinary divides and political history by relying on “political development” as a comparative-politics and international-relations good-governance methodology with two analytical axes: the role of ideas, and hybrid institutionalism in the increasingly horizontal global social sphere. The seminar is also informed by Women’s Studies literature, given its emphasis on difference as the United States built a relatively strong nation-state and became a global hegemon. It pays particular attention to masculinity and misogynistic nation-building by focusing on what I call neotribalism – or intersections in inequality, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and bodies in re-volt (volt refers to the energy derived from creative difference), who resist despite our President who may continue waging the “war on women.”


Charles Tien – Minority Politics (AP)
PSC 82001 – 4 credits (CRN # 35245)
Monday 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Course Description: (TBA)

This course examines critical questions and debates in race and ethnic politics in America. We will highlight political science approaches to the study of the histories of minorities in American politics, but also read in other fields. Primarily, the course will investigate theories of race and racism, and how race and ethnic politics interacts with American political and social institutions.


David Jones – Congress (AP)
PSC 72210 – 3 credits (CRN # 35260)
Thursday 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Course Description:


The United States Congress is one of the most powerful representative assemblies and the most extensively studied political institutions in the world. This course is designed to help students develop a basic understanding of the major works and debates in the scholarly study of Congress, as well as the ability to explain, synthesize, and critique them. The course is targeted for students seeking to complete the department’s first exam in American politics. Required readings for the course include all those in the Congress section of the American Politics Reading List, among many others. The course will cover Congress both from the perspective of individual members, including roll call voting and representation, and the institution as a whole, including committees, parties, leaders, and rules. We will also discuss contemporary political phenomena such as congressional polarization and the consequences of divided party control of the legislative and executive branches of government.

Comparative Politics


John Bowman – Comparative Political Economy (CP)
PSC 77902 – 3 credits (CRN# 35252)
Tuesday 4:15pm – 6:15pm

Course Description:

This course focuses on the relationship between politics and the structure and performance of advanced capitalist economies. Key questions include the following: What alternatives to neoliberal institutions and policies exist? What is their economic and political basis? In what direction are they headed? Why do some countries perform better than terms of outcomes like equality and unemployment rates? We will begin by exploring some classic themes in political economy–the social embeddedness of the economy and the distribution of power in capitalist economies–as well as examining some key features of the current political economic context, including globalization, post-industrialism, and Financialization.


Robert Jenkins – Comparative Politics and Economic Development in Contemporary India (CP)
PSC 87630 – 4 credits (CRN# 35262)
Tuesday 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Course Description:

This course examines aspects of India’s economic transformation over the past quarter-century, particularly the country’s transition to a more market-led and internationally oriented development paradigm. The material covers both traditional dimensions of development (growth, industrialization, etc.) and issues of human development (education, health, etc.). The course emphasizes the ways in which analysis of the Indian case can inform, and be informed by, conceptual frameworks and theoretical insights from the cross-national literature on development politics. The merits and shortcomings of intro-national comparison as a research strategy are also explored. Both substantive and methodological issues are addressed through a close reading of several recent monographs on aspects of Indian development. Before the course begins, students should read Ramachandra Guha, India after Gandhi (2008), a lively analytical history of independent India that engages with research from a range of academic disciplines.


Mark Ungar – Latin American Politics (CP)
PSC 77902 – 3 credits (CRN# 35256)
Thursday 11:45am – 1:45pm

Course Description:

This course is a critical and policy-centered examination of Latin American politics. Following a historical overview from the pre-colonial through the 20th Century authoritarian eras, we will assess key issues such as democratization, civil society, and electoral politics. Particular attention will be paid to regional challenges such as crime, the environment, justice, corruption, and inequality. Students will have the opportunity to focus both on specific countries as well as broader themes.

 


Janet E. Johnson – Basic Concepts & Methods in Comparative Politics (CP/M)
PSC 77904 – 3 credits (CRN# 35257)
Thursday 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Course Description:

One of the defining characteristics of comparative politics is its epistemological and methodological eclecticism. In other words, the subfield stretches from positivist and quantitative cross-national statistical analyses to the interpretivist and qualitative approaches of ethnography within single case studies, with the subfield-defining comparative method in the middle. The first goal of this course is for you to become familiar enough with the most important methods that you can assess work across the subfield. The second is for you to “try on” different methods to answer the research questions that you are starting to explore. We will begin by discussing the process of theory building, theory testing, and research design. Each week, we will read about the various methods and examine examples of how political scientists have used these methods to explore important questions of comparative politics. For these weeks, you will be required to summarize one of the assigned readings and attempt to use the method to address your research. The final assignment, allowing us to assess the degree which you have met these goals, will be a 7-10 page research proposal for a project in comparative politics.

International Relations


Ming Xia – International Political Economy (IR)
PSC 76300 – 3 credits (CRN# 35251)
Tuesday 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Course Description:

International Political Economy (IPE, or global political economy) is defined as “a collection of orientations, perspectives, theories, and methods addressed to understanding the relations between diverse political and economic phenomena at the global level”. In this course, the global financial crisis provides an entry point to examine the following contents: (1) evolution (a historical review of capitalism and the formation of global political economy), (2) theories and methods (normative theories include liberalism, mercantilism, Marxism, constructivism and critical approaches; research approaches include global vs. domestic-level, statist vs. societal explanations and rational choice approach), (3) structures (thematic issues  include production, trade, finance and development). The course concludes with a discussion on the global governance in IPE and global responses to globalization (both “good” and “bad” ones, e.g., illicit markets).


Kosal Path – Asian Security (IR)
PSC 76210 – 3 credits (CRN# 35253)
Tuesday 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Course Description:

This course is designed for advanced graduate students with prior knowledge of basic concepts and theories of international relations. It focuses on regional security dynamics and specific foreign policies of states in East Asia and Southeast Asia. Since the end of the Cold War, Asia-Pacific security dynamics have remarkably changed, exposing trajectory of both conflict and cooperation. At the turn of the twenty-first century, a pattern of increased economic interdependence and prosperity is oddly accompanied by great power rivalry and conflict. While the U.S. hub-and-spoke alliance system in Asia remains the corner stone of the regional security order, China’s assertiveness is challenging America’s primacy in the region.  In this course, we analyze contemporary security challenges in Asia from diverse IR theoretical perspectives. In doing so, we delve into the historical context of international relations in Asia, a region with diverse civilizations and complex historical interactions, and critically evaluate how such historical experiences can enrich Western IR theories.


Jacqueline Braveboy-Wagner – Comparative Foreign Policy (IR)
PSC 86105 – 4 credits (CRN# 35261)
Wednesday 4:15pm – 6:15pm

Course Description:

Foreign Policy Analysis remains one of the most popular subfields of international relations. Even though rational and positivist approaches have predominated in the field in the US, elsewhere a generous dose of comparative “area studies” ethnography as well as increasingly popular constructivist and critical thinking have invigorated the field.  In this specialized course we first ask how the study of foreign policy is different from international relations as a whole.  We then walk through the approaches used to analyze foreign policy, from realist views of the state as a protector and promoter of “national interests” to the Comparative Foreign Policy movement that came to the fore when so many Africa and Asian nations became independent, to the FPA of today which is rather too U.S.-dominated, and now to a renewed interest in two not incompatible approaches: regionalizing foreign policy and *worlding* foreign policy (that is, focusing on how a really universal approach to foreign policy can be attained; this is part of the overall Global IR movement).


Mojubaolu Olufunke Okome – Critical Perspectives on African Political Economy (IR)
PSC 77903 – 3 credits (CRN# 35249)
Thursday 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Course Description:

The course will conceptually and theoretically examine topics relevant to African political economy, including colonialism, imperialism, nationalism, development (and “modernization”), neoliberalism, and globalization. It will also consider radical theoretical critiques of African political economy. Through a consideration of Africa’s contemporary political and economic history, its precolonial structures, and external influences from colonialism, imperialism and globalization, on African states.  We will consider the relevance and usefulness of accepted terminologies, assumptions and theories for studying African political economy.  We will also consider the social forces that influence contemporary African political and economic relations including ethnicity, race, class, religion, and civil society.

 

Political Theory


Benjamin Vilhauer – Kant on the Freedom & Morality (PT)
PSC 80303 – 4 credits (CRN# 35579)
Monday 11:45am – 1:45pm
(Cross list with PHIL 76000)

Course Description:

This course will cover selections from Kant’s major moral writings, including parts of the Critique of Pure Reason, the Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals, the Critique of Practical Reason, and the Metaphysics of Morals, along with the writings of recent commentators. The goal will be to explore Kant’s texts as well as their connections to issues in contemporary ethics and free will theory.


Charles Mills – Contrarianism and its Critics (PT)
PSC 80303 – 4 credits (CRN# 35580)
Monday 2:00pm – 4:00pm
(Cross list with PHIL 77500)

Course Description:

This course will look at classic social contract theory—Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Kant—which was dramatically revived as a result of John Rawls’1971 A Theory of Justice. We will try to get clear on both the important commonalities in their divergent versions of the “contract” as a way of understanding the creation of society, the polity, and people’s resulting obligations, and the crucial differences among their versions. We will then turn to some of the criticisms of the contract idea, whether the classic “communitarian” critique or critiques oriented by class, gender, and racial concerns. The course should be useful in its own right as an exploration of a central strand in modern Western political theory, but for those interested in the subject, it should also be a valuable foundation for a fall 2017 course I hope to co-teach with Sibyl Schwarzenbach on Rawls’ and gender and racial justice.


Corey Robin – Political Theory of Capitalism (PT)
PSC 80303 – 4 credits (CRN# 35246)
Monday 4:15pm – 6:15pm

Course Description:

In ancient Greece, the dominant political form was the city-state. In Rome, it was the republic and the empire. After the fall of Rome, it was the Church. In the early modern era, it became the state. Today, it is capitalism. But where Greece, Rome, the Church, and the state all produced their own distinctive political theories, capitalism has not. Indeed, it’s greatest—and, with the exception of Hayek, perhaps only—political theorist devoted his attentions to capitalism solely in order to bring it to an end. For many, capitalism is not a political form at all; it is strictly a mode of economic organization. What is entailed in that distinction—between the political and the economic—and whether and how it can be sustained will be a central preoccupation of this course. Through an examination of the classics of political economy, as well as some less canonical texts, we will assess whether capitalism has (or can have) a political theory, and if so, what that theory is.  Rather than assume that the political question of capitalism is exhausted by the state’s relationship to the economy, we will examine how capitalism produces a distinctive and independent political form of its own, with its own rules and values. Readings will be drawn from some combination of the following thinkers: Aristotle, Locke, Hume, Smith, Hegel, Malthus, Ricardo, Marx, Jevons, Weber, Keynes, Schumpeter, Arendt, Hayek, Becker, Friedman, Foucault, Brown, Harvey.


Justin Steinberg – Spinoza (PT)
PSC 80303 – 4 credits (CRN# 35581)
Wednesday 2:00pm-4:00pm
(Cross list with PHIL 76200)

Course Description:

Baruch de Spinoza was the most scandalous philosopher of his age. His aggressive naturalism challenged the sensibilities and orthodoxies of a seventeenth-century audience. And his philosophy remains provocative, even if not scandalous, today. In this course we will investigate the full range of Spinoza’s thought: metaphysics, epistemology; theory of mind, account of the affects, ethical theory, and political philosophy. We will explore how core features of Spinoza’s thought—including his monism, dual-aspect theory of mind, account of belief-formation, sentimentalist model of evaluative judgments, and defense of democratic governance—can be brought fruitfully into dialogue with contemporary philosophical work, while seeking to remain alive to the strangeness of Spinoza’s views. We will read the Ethics along with selections from his two political treatises, attending to the extent to which Spinoza is a systematic philosopher whose normative philosophy depends on his account of psychology and whose his account of psychology is firmly anchored in his metaphysics.


John Wallach – Democratic Theory (PT)
PSC 80402 – 4 credits (CRN # 35258)
Thursday 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Course Description:

This seminar offers a wide-ranging, in-depth, historical and theoretical analysis of democracy as a form of political life.  It begins with two assumptions.  The first is that democracy, at root, needs to be understood as authoritative political power (kratos) exercised by the people (e.g., demos).  As such, the kind of democracy we imagine when we use the term never has existed.  Athenian democracy was overly exclusive in terms of its conception of the demos;  modern democracy mostly offers chewed-over crumbs for the popular exercise of political power.  In this respect, references to American democracy today are mostly metaphorical or rhetorical legerdemain.  The second assumption is that “democracy,” as a form of power, is not self-legitimating.  For no exercise of power by anyone, individually or collectively, is automatically good.  For democracy to live as a political formation, it needs justification as an agent of liberty and equality in the world — one that wins support across differences and divisions among the people.  From this perspective, we shall look at principal texts from historical and contemporary political theory that argue for practical forms of legitimation for democratic political life.  These include virtue (e.g., Aristotle, Rousseau); representation (e.g., Hobbes, Madison); civil rightness and liberalism (e.g., J. S. Mill); capitalism, organization (Marx, Michels, E. Wood); legitimacy (Rawls, Abensour, Wolin), and human rights (Sen, Asad).  The approach followed is historicist, focusing on how democracy has been and could be legitimately enacted while analytically attending to theoretical coherence.  Connections between the past, present, and future will be presupposed but carefully distinguished as much as possible.  Students will be asked to required to write a mid-term on assigned texts and a free-standing paper (@ 15-20 pages) on a topic in democratic theory discussed in the seminar or related to it and rooted in its concerns (and approved).  The contours of the course stem from a forthcoming book of mine, being published by Cambridge University Press in early 2018.

 

Public Policy


Hector Cordero-Guzman – Community Based Organization & Public Policy (PP)
PSC 72500 – 3 credits (CRN# 35263)
Tuesday 11:45am – 1:45pm

(Cross list with SOC 84700)

Course Description:

This course reviews the academic literature and current theoretical and empirical debates focusing on Community Based Groups, Organizations and Service providers and their connections to public policy debates and processes. The class explores who these organizations are; how they set and achieve their mission and related goals; what activities they tend to engage in; how they connect to their communities and other stakeholders; how they manage and find material, monetary and other resources to support their work; and how they connect to public policy institutions and policy debates. The course will focus on presenting, discussing, and analyzing materials and cases from a range of social service, labor and workforce based, advocacy, and community action oriented non-profit organizations and will explore how their experience informs contemporary debates and understandings about the role of civil society organizations in the lives and outcomes of communities and community residents.


Michael Jacobson – Public and Social Policy Development, Analysis, and Evaluation (PP)
PSC 72500 – 3 credits (CRN# 35657)
Tuesday 4:15pm – 6:15pm
(Cross list with SOC 84700)

Course Description:

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of public policy development, implementation, and evaluation in real-world settings, using local and national examples from the work of the Institute for State and Local Governance (ISLG), a research and policy organization within the City University of New York (CUNY). During the course, students will develop a foundational knowledge of the formal and informal policy making process with particular attention to how reforms can be proposed and implemented in what have become deeply politicized and resource constrained environments. Specific areas of focus will include the translation of research into policy and practice, the importance of relationship building, and the role of fiscal constraints in state and local decision-making. Students will complete a semester-long capstone project that addresses the learning objectives in the context of the work of the Institute. Students will complete readings and assignments related to social and public policy development, analysis, and evaluation to supplement their capstone work.


John Mollenkopf & Leslie McCall – Working Class Politics (PP)
PSC 72500 – 3 credits (CRN# 35254)
Wednesday 4:15pm – 6:15pm
(Cross list with SOC 84700)

Course Description:

This seminar addresses a variety of theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on 1) what we mean by “class” and the “working class,” 2) what forces have been reshaping the working class in the U.S. and beyond, such as technological innovation, globalization, the rising share of income going to the top one percent, changing gender and family roles and work-family relations, and the changing gender, racial, ethnic, and nativity composition of the workforce (including how the “white male working class” may be distinctive), and 3) how class membership and more general socio-economic position relate to the adoption of distinctive political values and identities, forms of political mobilization and participation, and policy preferences.  The course concludes by looking at the role that class played in the 2016 presidential election and the ensuing political dynamics of the city and nation.


Michael Fortner – Race & American Public Policy (PP)
PSC 72001 – 3 credits (CRN# 35255)
Wednesdays, 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Course Description:

This course examines the relationship between race and public policy development in the United States.  The course begins by exploring a series of conceptual, theoretical, and historical questions: How do we conceptualize and measure white supremacy?  How does white supremacy interact with other structural forms of inequality, specifically gender and class?  How has race shaped American political development?  Then we will then turn to case-by-case examinations of the impact of race, class, and gender on several contemporary federal public policy areas like social welfare, immigration, and crime.  This course draws primarily from political science, but also incorporates historical, sociological, and legal scholarship to critically assess race and public policy.


Branko Milanovic – Within National inequalities: from Pareto to Piketty (PP)
PSC 72500 – 3 credits (CRN# 35574)
Wednesdays, 6:30pm – 8:30pm
(Cross list with ECON 81500)

Course Description:

The objective of the course is be to review, analyze, and allow students to develop a much better understanding of the theories and empirics of personal income distribution within a single policy-making unit (that is, normally within a nation-state). The first such theory was developed by Vilfredo Pareto more than 100 years ago. Pareto believes that income distribution does not change regardless of a social system and level of development. Simon Kuznets, in the 1950s, posited, on the contrary, a theory where income inequality evolves as societies get richer.  These theories will be considered on the real-world examples of movements of inequality in Brazil, China, “transition countries” and the United States and other advanced economies. We shall focus especially on the recent evolution of income and wealth inequality in the United States and Piketty’s analytical contributions. The class will be fairly empirical but does not require any prior specific knowledge of the issues nor techniques. It is recommended for students of economics, political science, and sociology.


Alexander Reichl – Housing Politics & Policy (PP)
PSC 73202 – 3 credits (CRN# 35259)
Thursdays, 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Course Description:

Housing is one of life’s basic necessities, but it’s also more than that: it is a major sector of the US economy, a primary source of personal wealth, and a resource that determines access to other resources like quality schools, good jobs, and safe streets. Although the vast majority of housing is rented and sold for profit, the housing market is heavily influenced by government policies. In this course we will examine the main factors that affect the production and consumption of housing in the US with a focus on what government does, why it does those things, and who wins and losses as a result. Topics include public housing, gentrification, sub-urbanization, segregation, and more.

 

General and Cross-field


Peter Beinart (G)
PSC 79002 – 3 credits (CRN#35244)
Monday 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Course Description:

Writing Politics II is the successor to Writing Politics I, although students may take it without taking the predecessor. The biggest difference is that we’ll focus more on writing for publication. The goal will be for each student to publish at least one, hopefully several, of the columns they write. We will start by coming up with a list of the publications that each student wants to target. We will then focus our reading on those publications, since in submitting to a particular publication, it’s critical to understand its particular style and perspective. We will focus in more detail on how to make contact with particular editors at those publications and part of the assignments themselves will be figuring out (with my help) how to make the connections necessary to get your pieces seriously considered.

I’ll tailor my guest speaker invitations to the particular publications students decide to target. If a piece is ready for publication on the first draft, I won’t ask for a rewrite. If the first draft suggests no hope of publication, I may suggest we choose a different topic rather than requesting a second draft. If there’s a danger of the window of opportunity on a certain subject closing, I may change the due dates for certain assignments. The goal is to give us maximum flexibility to increase the chances of publication. Because this course is more of a workshop than Writing Politics I, I may also bring in some of my own writing in concept or draft form and submit it to the same critical review that I give the students work.

If there is student interest, I will also assign a longer essay (2000-4000 words) in addition to columns. Students who did not take Writing Politics I are welcome. I will likely set up a special session near the beginning to go over some of the basics about story organization and sentence structure that we covered in that class. And as the semester progresses, I will vary readings and assignments to make sure that students who need additional grounding in non-academic political writing get it. In the past, students who have not taken Writing Politics I have nonetheless thrived in Writing Politics II.

Peter Liberman – Dissertation Proposal Workshop (G/PD)
PSC 89100 – 0 credits (CRN # 35250)
Tuesday 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Course Description:

This workshop aims to assist students in writing their dissertation proposal in political science and taking the second examination.  It introduces students to the principles and organization of a defensible proposal, provides advice on conceptualization and research strategies, and, where relevant to the workshop participants, discusses methodological questions. It is a genuine workshop, where students provide each other a mutually supportive setting to share the stages of their written drafts, get feedback, identify and resolve issues being faced by many, and learn the skills of analytical criticism necessary to one’s own future research and teaching.

Each member works at a personal, self-identified pace, but also accepts the obligation of reciprocity to attend all meetings of the workshop and read the drafts of all other workshop members.  Key to progress is the obligation to write every single week, even if it only means a paragraph (although, of course, one hopes more).  The first meeting of the workshop will lay out the principles and advice; anyone missing it will be at a distinct, even possibly irreparable, disadvantage for the rest of the workshop. The workshop does not give course credit, therefore has no grading, and can be taken more than once.

 

 

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