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Alumni News: Psychology

McMahan book coverIan McMahan (Psychology, 1972), professor emeritus of psychology at Brooklyn College, recently coauthored, with Michael Terman of Columbia University Medical Center, Chronotherapy: Resetting Your Inner Clock to Boost Mood, Alertness, and Quality Sleep (Avery, 2012). The book lays out what we know about the particular circadian problems that may affect children, adolescents, and the aged, and puts forth specific ways these problems can be dealt with. People with depression, bipolar and sleep disorders, shift work problems, and jet lag recount their experiences with chronotherapy in their own words. Stepping into the future, this book suggests how the insights of chronobiology can help shape tomorrow’s work schedules, education systems, and architectural practices to better our lives.

In his college textbook Adolescence (Pearson, 2008), McMahan provides a developmental context for chronotherapy in sleep-disturbed teens. The book brings together his two simultaneous career paths as a writer. As a developmental psychologist, he has written in major academic journals about his research on children’s achievement. As an author of fiction and nonfiction for both adults and children, he has written books ranging from children’s mysteries to historical novels, among them Get It Done! A Guide to Motivation, Determination and Achievement (Avon, 1996) and a history of ancient Egypt, Secrets of the Pharaohs (Harper Perennial, 1998).

Puleng Segalo (Social/Personality Psychology, 2013) successfully defended her dissertation, titled “In Our Own Voices: Black Women’s Narratives of Conflict and Post-conflict Experiences,” in October 2012. Since June 2000 she has been serving as full-time lecturer at the University of South Africa (UNISA), where she is currently teaching a course on community and social psychology. Her research focuses broadly on issues of historical trauma and suffering, gender, power, sexuality, and the interplay of these factors. She is inspired by and draws heavily from critical feminist theories and narrative research approaches. In March she received UNISA’s Principal’s Prize for Excellence in Research to fund her research. 

Submitted on: FEB 26, 2013

Category: Psychology, Psychology - Social Personality, Alumni News