Show The Graduate Center Menu
 
 

Course Descriptions


Year 1  Fall Semester

70500: Statistical Methods in Psychology I: An initial comprehensive review will cover tests of significance, one-way, independent groups and repeated-measures ANOVA, simple multiple comparisons, 2 × 2 factorial ANOVA, power analysis and SAS programs. This is followed by assumption failure, general multiple comparison procedures, general two-way ANOVA, three-way and higher factorial ANOVA, higher-order interaction effects, contrast coding, mixed designs, multiple regression and analysis of covariance.
75500: Psychopathology I: The identification and diagnosis of psychopathology including mood, anxiety, thought, and personality disorders. We will discuss the current psychiatric multi-axial classification system (DSM-IV) and consider psychopathology from a number of different perspectives (e.g., neurobiological, cognitive, behavioral and psychoanalytic). We will also consider multicultural and historical influences on the definition of psychopathology and the stability and change of psychopathology throughout the life course.
76000: Psychometric Methods: A general introduction to psychometric methods which focuses on administration, standardization, norms, reliability, validity, and test construction.  Lectures cover the history of intelligence testing and the development of techniques for assessing personality and psychiatric disorders, as well as basic issues related to intelligence testing and an introduction to the Wechsler intelligence scales.
 77100: Ethical/Legal Issues for Psychologists: Ethical and legal issues that arise in the course of dealing with human or animal subjects, in teaching, research, assessing or treating patients, interacting with colleagues and the public, and in publishing scholarly works. Professional issues, such as preparing CVs, job seeking, certification and licensing are also considered.

Year 1  Spring Semester

70310: Research Methods and Design: An intensive examination of experimental research methodology, with emphasis on the following topics: experimental vs. nonexperimental approaches to research; the control of variables and its relation to internal, external, and statistical validities; the relationship between design and analysis of data. Variants of between-group, within-group, and single-subject designs are considered, with an evaluation of the properties of each design type. The applicability of research design principles across a variety of substantive research areas is considered.
 
76601: Psychodiagnostics I: Intelligence Testing:  (Prerequisites: Psych 76000 and Psych 77100) This course will provide an introduction to clinical interviewing for the assessment of behavior, personality, and psychopathology; to the administration and interpretation of measures of intelligence (e.g., Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children – IV and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – IV); and to test-report writing.  Diversity issues (e.g., age, gender, ethnicity, educational level, and sexual orientation) will be considered with respect to test administration, interpretation of test findings, diagnostic issues, and the therapeutic relationship and rapport during testing. 
78703: Systems of Psychotherapy I: (Prerequisite: 75500: Psychopathology I). The course provides an up-to date review of the evidence-based research literature on the theories and practice of psychotherapy. Major schools of psychotherapy (e.g., cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic) will be compared and contrasted with the aim of evaluating the relative efficacy of various intervention approaches. Course material will include how these approaches apply to different diagnostic conditions (e.g., depression, anxiety, and personality disorders) and how sociocultural factors (e.g., age, gender, sexual orientation, and ethnicity) influence the course and efficacy of treatment.
70600: Statistical Methods in Psychology II (Prerequisite: 70500): Multivariate statistical methods including simple correlations, regression, multiple and partial correlation, factor analysis theory and practice, canonical correlations, discriminant function analysis, one-way and factorial MANOVA, multiple comparisons for multivariate data, advanced power analysis and robust testing.

Year 2  Fall Semester  

72000 Developmental Psychology I: A lifespan perspective, from conception to death, on the development changes in sensory and perceptual functions, language, cognition, personality, and psychosocial adaptation.
 
76701: Psychodiagnostics II: Personality Assessment: (Prerequisites: Psych 75500, 76601, 77100) An introduction to clinical interviewing for the assessment of personality and psychopathology and to the administration and interpretation of commonly used objective inventories and rating scales, plus a survey of projective tests. Issues of cultural diversity (e.g., age, gender, sexual orientation, and ethnicity) will be considered with respect to psychiatric diagnosis, interpretation of test results and the therapeutic relationship.
 
84400: Diversity Issues/Clinical Psychology:  This 3-credit course is designed to cover a range of diversity and cross-cultural issues as they apply to the discipline of clinical psychology. These issues are approached from two different perspectives. The first refers to specific content areas, including ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, gender, age, and disabilities. More specifically, the ethnicity area includes racial, national, religious and linguistic components. The second perspective concerns the process underlying the practice of clinical psychology, running from the beginning to end stages of that process: self-assessment, establishing rapport, assessment, standardized testing, diagnosis and therapy. Throughout the course, case examples will be included. Of note, course readings will include materials authored by individuals from diverse backgrounds.
70801: Neuroanatomy: The course introduces students to the organizational structure of the human brain, including slide material of gross neuroanatomy, cerebral vasculature, spinal organization, and internal structure from medulla to cortex. Functional system mini-lectures are also provided for the sensory and motor systems, the thalamus, hypothalamus, basal ganglia, limbic system, cerebellum and cortex. Neuroanatomical mapping of major neurochemical systems and their receptors is also provided. Course expectations include both visuo-spatial and written fluency of the material.

Year 2  Spring Semester

85400 Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology: This course is designed to facilitate entry into the field of clinical psychology and to ensure that students have a knowledge base of professional issues that arise in academic and practice settings. The aims of the course are to foster attitudes essential for life-long learning, scholarly inquiry and professional problem-solving. The course will include review of current APA standards, codes, and guidelines that govern psychological practice, research, and career development. National and state legislations will be discussed that are relevant to the practice of psychology and neuropsychology.
 
71100: Cognitive and Affective Aspects of Behavior (Prerequisites: 70801): This course examines the behavioral and brain mechanisms and functions associated with cognitive and affective aspects of behavior. The course focuses on historic and current behavioral and neuroscience research to understand cognitive and affective processes in the human brain related to attention, executive processes, working- and long-term memory, language, stress and memory, affective regulation, affective disorders, and emotion and cognition interactions.
74600: Social Psychology: A survey of classic and contemporary research and theory. Topics include stereotyping and prejudice, cross-cultural studies, social influence, the self, gender, social cognition, and others.
82908: Systems of Psychotherapy II: Evidence-based treatments: The aim of the course is to become familiar with evidence-based psychotherapy treatments (EBT).The course is focused on critically examining the available evidence for these treatments, weighing the strength of this evidence and contemplating the various individual, family and environmental factors that are relevant to whether and to what degree these treatments are appropriate and likely to be effective with various populations.  To meet these objectives, students will examine the empirical literature on EBTs and discuss various perspectives on the debate about their efficacy and effectiveness.
 
80200 Independent Research for En Route Master’s Project: Independent Research under the mentorship of a Program faculty member. Required as part of the en route master’s project.
 

Year 2  Summer

70341: Externship in Clinical Psychology I: Students are required to spend 16 hours per week over the summer working in the Queens College Psychological Center (QCPC) under the direct supervision of a clinical program faculty member. As part of the clinical psychology externship sequence, students (1) are exposed to a diverse clinical population in which relevant theoretical, empirical and clinical issues can be integrated within an evidence-based framework; (2) learn to: a) build rapport with diverse populations; b) create collaborative treatments that carefully consider the needs, values, and preferences of individual patients; c) conduct biopsychosocial intake evaluations; d) conduct risk assessments; e) develop a formulation and treatment plan; f) implement a treatment plan, with attention to the management of fidelity and flexibility; g) consult on the client's behalf (e.g., with parents, teachers, psychiatrists, internists, and other caretakers); h) document patients’ care and progress; i) manage termination; and j) conduct a testing assessment with a written report and feedback to the client; (3) participate in formal case presentations, didactics and administrative meetings; (4) develop a professional identity as a clinical psychologist working within a professional clinical setting - professionalism, ethical decision-making, collegiality, interdisciplinary collaboration and mentorship are modeled and taught as an integral component of training; and (5) get familiar with, and practice, the various roles of a psychologist in a clinical setting, including that of clinician, administrator, consultant and supervisor, including program development and evaluation, community outreach, and vertical and horizontal peer supervision.  Both grades and written evaluations are required. 
 

Year 3  Fall Semester

70000: History of Psychology: Topics include the mind-body problem, nativism and empiricism, hedonism and reinforcement, hypnotism and spiritualism, psychophysiology and psychopathology. Schools of psychology (structuralism, functionalism, Gestalt, psychoanalysis and behaviorism) are reviewed, as are the contributions of philosophers, physical, biological and social scientists.
 
81703: Survey of Clinical Neuropsychology (Prerequisites: 70801, 75500): The course reviews the fundamentals of neuropsychology with an emphasis on applying the knowledge of brain-behavior relationships to neurological, psychiatric, and other medical disorders affecting higher cortical functioning. The course covers disorders of attention, aphasia, amnesia, agnosia, apraxia, parietal syndromes and dysexecutive syndromes.
74000: Personality and Individual Differences: The course focus is on contemporary research in personality and individual differences. Topics include factor analytic research, the nature of dispositions, motivation, behavior genetics, brain and personality, the self, intelligence, personality change, health, work, cognitive style and others.
70342: Externship in Clinical Psychology II: Students are required to spend 16 hours per week over the summer working in the Queens College Psychological Center (QCPC) under the direct supervision of a clinical program faculty member. As part of the clinical psychology externship sequence, students (1) are exposed to a diverse clinical population in which relevant theoretical, empirical and clinical issues can be integrated within an evidence-based framework; (2) learn to: a) build rapport with diverse populations; b) create collaborative treatments that carefully consider the needs, values, and preferences of individual patients; c) conduct biopsychosocial intake evaluations; d) conduct risk assessments; e) develop a formulation and treatment plan; f) implement a treatment plan, with attention to the management of fidelity and flexibility; g) consult on the client's behalf (e.g., with parents, teachers, psychiatrists, internists, and other caretakers); h) document patients’ care and progress; i) manage termination; and j) conduct a testing assessment with a written report and feedback to the client; (3) participate in formal case presentations, didactics and administrative meetings; (4) develop a professional identity as a clinical psychologist working within a professional clinical setting - professionalism, ethical decision-making, collegiality, interdisciplinary collaboration and mentorship are modeled and taught as an integral component of training; and (5) get familiar with, and practice, the various roles of a psychologist in a clinical setting, including that of clinician, administrator, consultant and supervisor, including program development and evaluation, community outreach, and vertical and horizontal peer supervision.  Both grades and written evaluations are required. 
 

Year 3  Spring Semester

 
70802: Neurophysiology: This course considers electrophysiological phenomena from the perspective of biophysical and chemical phenomena. Discussions concentrate on cellular neurophysiology in terms of electrical potentials within single cells (Hodgkin-Huxley), synaptic mechanisms and interrelationships in small neural networks. This course includes recent molecular, ion channel and modulatory phenomena related to pre-synaptic, post-synaptic and membrane-mediated activity.
 
76100 Neuropsychological Assessment: (Prerequisites: 76000, 81703): An introduction to neuropsychological assessment techniques. The course provides direct training in neuropsychological assessment and reviews neurological tests for evaluation of brain damaged adults and children. The course covers tests of fund of knowledge, attention, language and aphasia, memory perception and gnosis, apraxia and motor function, parietal syndromes and frontal executive syndromes. Each test is discussed in terms of the logic underlying it, sociocultural and theoretical perspectives. Tasks include neuropsychological evaluations, clinical report writing, and oral case presentation. Laboratory exercises provide direct experience and supervision of a variety of neuropsychological tests, to acquire competence in their administration.

70803: Psychopharmacology: This course discusses the basic chemical architecture of the central nervous system and metabolic pathways of functional significance. Emphasis is placed upon membrane properties, synaptic transmission, pharmacological principles, second messenger systems and molecular mechanisms mediating receptor and transmitter function. Each of the major aminergic and peptidergic neurotransmitter and receptor subtype systems is reviewed.
70342: Externship in Clinical Psychology III: Students are required to spend 16 hours per week over the summer working in the Queens College Psychological Center (QCPC) under the direct supervision of a clinical program faculty member. As part of the clinical psychology externship sequence, students (1) are exposed to a diverse clinical population in which relevant theoretical, empirical and clinical issues can be integrated within an evidence-based framework; (2) learn to: a) build rapport with diverse populations; b) create collaborative treatments that carefully consider the needs, values, and preferences of individual patients; c) conduct biopsychosocial intake evaluations; d) conduct risk assessments; e) develop a formulation and treatment plan; f) implement a treatment plan, with attention to the management of fidelity and flexibility; g) consult on the client's behalf (e.g., with parents, teachers, psychiatrists, internists, and other caretakers); h) document patients’ care and progress; i) manage termination; and j) conduct a testing assessment with a written report and feedback to the client; (3) participate in formal case presentations, didactics and administrative meetings; (4) develop a professional identity as a clinical psychologist working within a professional clinical setting - professionalism, ethical decision-making, collegiality, interdisciplinary collaboration and mentorship are modeled and taught as an integral component of training; and (5) get familiar with, and practice, the various roles of a psychologist in a clinical setting, including that of clinician, administrator, consultant and supervisor, including program development and evaluation, community outreach, and vertical and horizontal peer supervision.  Both grades and written evaluations are required.
 
 

Year 4  Fall Semester

71000: Sensory & Motor Systems: (Prerequisites: 70801/02/03): This course deals with the behavioral and physiological basis of sensory perception and the execution of motor actions.
70344:  Clinical Externship IV: Neuropsychology: (prerequisites: 70341, 70342, 70343) Students will be under the supervision of a licensed psychologist as the course instructor for all activities. The supervisor will have expertise in Neuropsychology. Students will interact directly with patients who have various neurological, psychiatric, and/or medical disorders.  The student may participate in interviewing patients and in conducting feedback sessions with patients and/or families.  Students will administer a variety of neuropsychological (including cognitive and affective) measures, score test data, interpret test data, develop treatment recommendations, and write test reports.
85408: Supervision and Consultation: This course in supervision and consultation will survey a variety of models in an effort to understand and gain exposure to our roles as consultants and supervisors. The class will focus on the ways in which the psychological dispositions of individuals becomes manifested on the stage of organizational/institutional life, and how awareness of the various processes that are involved in consultation and supervision enable the psychologist to work more effectively.
 
83908: Advanced Seminar in Psychotherapy (Prerequisites: 78703; 82908): This advanced seminar in psychotherapeutic interventions will vary both in instructor and content from semester to semester.  It will provide comprehensive readings and discussions to provide an in-depth focus on a particular therapeutic approach/treatment modality or a particular patient group.  Examples of potential seminars include the treatment of borderline personality; Transference Focused Psychotherapy (TFP), Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), or child interventions.
 

 

Year 4  Spring Semester

70345: Clinical Externship V: Neuropsychology (prerequisites: 70341, 70342, 70343, 70344):  Students will be under the supervision of a licensed psychologist as the course instructor for all activities. The psychologist will have expertise in Neuropsychology. The course will build upon skills acquired during 70344.  Students will interact directly with patients who have various neurological, psychiatric, and/or medical disorders.  The student may participate in interviewing patients and in conducting feedback sessions with patients and/or families.  Students will administer a variety of neuropsychological (including cognitive and affective) measures, score test data, interpret test data, develop treatment recommendations, and write test reports.