What Is the Current State of New York’s Creative Economy?

SEP 24, 2013 | 6:30 PM

Details

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:

1201: Elebash Recital Hall

WHEN:

September 24, 2013: 6:30 PM

ADMISSION:

Free, Reservations Required

RESERVATIONS:

212-817-8215 or

Description

Featuring Kate D. Levin, commissioner of the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs; Jonathan Bowles, executive director of the Manhattan-based Center for an Urban Future; and sociologist Elizabeth Currid-Halkett, author of The Warhol Economy. William P. Kelly, interim chancellor of the City University of New York, will moderate.

Kate D. Levin is the commissioner of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. In this role, she directs cultural policy for New York City, supporting and strengthening nonprofit cultural organizations throughout the five boroughs through public funding, technical assistance and advocacy. Prior to her appointment, Levin taught at the City College of New York/CUNY, worked at several New York City cultural organizations, and served in the Koch administration. During his fourteen years at the Center for an Urban Future, Jonathan Bowles has been the architect of its policy agenda and has turned the center into one of New York’s most influential think tanks. As the author of numerous policy reports, he has written about the city’s tech start-up scene and the impact of immigrant entrepreneurs on urban economies. Elizabeth Currid-Halkett is associate professor at USC’s Sol Price School of Public Policy, where she teaches courses in economic development, urban policy, and planning. In addition to her books The Warhol Economy: How Fashion, Art and Music Drive New York City and Starstruck: The Business of Celebrity, Currid-Halkett has written articles for the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Times of London, the Economist, the New Yorker, and various academic publications. William P. Kelly, before taking up his post as interim chancellor of the City University of New York, in July 2013, served for eight years as president of the Graduate Center. A distinguished scholar of American literature, he is chairman of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the CUNY Research Foundation and has published essays and reviews in a broad range of publications, including the Times Literary Supplement, the New York Times Book Review, and the American Scholar.

This program is part of the yearlong initiative Cultural Capital: The Promise and Price of New York’s Creative Economy, produced by GC Public Programs in collaboration with the Advanced Research Collaborative (ARC). For more information and the full schedule, CLICK HERE.