Belonging in Istanbul and Alexandria: A Lecture with Sinem Adar

SEP 27, 2013 | 6:30 PM TO 8:00 PM

Details

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:

9205

WHEN:

September 27, 2013: 6:30 PM-8:00 PM

CONTACT INFO:

ADMISSION:

Free

Description

Based on interviews and newspaper reviews, Dr. Adar argues that non-Muslims in Istanbul were left in an ambiguous zone between individual citizenship and confessional membership. State policies that dissolved the communal realm as a primary basis of social organization rendered confessional communities symbolic—one exception was in the 1950s. On the other hand, the communal realm was an important source of belonging for Non-Muslims in Alexandria especially when they lacked formal citizenship status, as it was the case with some non-Coptic and non-Muslim groups.

Sinem Adar is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Sociology Department at the University of South Florida. She recently defended her Ph.D. dissertation in Sociology at Brown University, entitled "Waiting for the Future, Longing for the Past: Ambiguities of Belonging in Turkey and Egypt." Her research interests include nationalism and nation-state building, identity formation and belonging. She has a forthcoming article, entitled "Ambiguities of Democratization: Nationalism, Religion and Ethnicity in Turkey," in Political Power and Social Theory.