Feminism, Civil Rights & African Anti-Colonialism

APR 03, 2014 | 1:00 PM TO 7:30 PM

Details

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:

9206

WHEN:

April 03, 2014: 1:00 PM-7:30 PM

CONTACT INFO:

ADMISSION:

Free

Description

Feminism, Civil Rights & African Anti-Colonialism

The symposium on “Feminism, Civil Rights, and African Anti-Colonialism" brings together feminist scholars and activists from the U.S. civil rights movement and the African anti-colonial movement to discuss the similarities and divergences between the two movements as well as the possibility for progressive social and ideological change in the contemporary moment.

Panelists:
Dr. Tuzyline Allan, School of Humanities and Sciences, Department of English, Baruch College, CUNY
Dr. Cheryl Johnson-Odim, Provost, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dominican University
Dr. Barbara Ransby, Director of Gender and Women’s Studies Program, University of Illinois at Chicago
Dr. Beverly Guy Sheftall, Director of the Women’s Research and Resource Center and the Anna Julia Cooper, Professor of Women’s Studies, Spelman College
Dr. Peyi  Soyinka-Airewele, Department of Politics, Ithaca College
Dr. Jeanne Theoharis, Department of Political Science, Brooklyn College

Moderators:
Dr. Mojubaolu Olufunke Okome and Dr. Michele Wallace

Schedule: Feminism, Civil Rights, and African Anti-Colonialism
April 3rd - Room 9206/9207


•         1pm.  Welcoming Remarks: Robert Reid-Pharr, Michele Wallace,  Mojúbàolú Olufúnké (“Funke”) Okome
 
•         1:30 – 3:00 pm  Panel I: “Feminism and the U.S. Civil Rights Movement” (Dr. Barbara Ransby, Dr. Beverly Guy-   Sheftall, Dr. Jeanne Theoharis; moderator: Michele Wallace)
 
•         3:00 – 4:00 pm: Break 
 
•         4:00 – 5:30 pm. Panel II: “African women and anti colonial resistance” (Dr. Tuzyline Allan; Dr. Cheryl Johnson-Odim, Dr. Peyi Soyinka-Airewele; moderator: Mojúbàolú Olufúnké (“Funke”) Okome)
 
•         5:30 – 7:00 pm: Reception.



"African Women Intellectuals and the Anti-Colonial Struggle in the Twentieth Century"
Dr. Tuzyline Allan, School of Humanities and Sciences, Department of English, Baruch College, CUNY

“Double Duty, Double Consciousness: African Women’s Negotiation of Their Struggles Against Colonialism and Indigenous Patriarchy”
Dr. Cheryl Johnson-Odim, Provost, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dominican University

"Black Women and the Legacy of Internationalism and Trans-National Solidarity" 
Dr. Barbara Ransby, Director of Gender and Women’s Studies Program, University of Illinois at Chicago

Dr. Beverly Guy Sheftall, Director of the Women’s Research and Resource Center and the Anna Julia Cooper, Professor of Women’s Studies, Spelman College

Liberation Fighter to Area Thug: Framing Women’s Rights and Rites of Sacrifice in Cinema and Postcolonial Politics
Dr. Peyi  Soyinka-Airewele, Department of Politics, Ithaca College

"Any Move to Show We are Dissatisfied": Rosa Parks in the Jim Crow North
Dr. Jeanne Theoharis, Department of Political Science, Brooklyn College
 



Tuzyline Jita Allan is a professor in the English Department at Baruch College (CUNY) where she teaches African American literature and Great Works of literature.  A West African native, she holds a B.A. (Honors), M.A., and Ph.D. in English and has published and lectured widely on the art and politics of women writers. Her books include the award winning Womanist and Feminist Aesthetics: A Comparative Review; Twelve Best Books By African Women Writers (coeditor); Masculinities in African Literary and Cultural Contexts (coeditor); and Women Writing Africa -The Southern, Eastern, and West African/Sahel volumes (co-series editor).

Cheryl Johnson-Odim is Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at Dominican University in River Forest, Illinois. Johnson-Odim has a doctorate in history from Northwestern University and was a Fulbright Fellow in Nigeria. She is a past chair of the Joan Kelly Prize Committee (annually awarded for the best book in women’s history or feminist theory) of the American Historical Association and on the Founding Board of Associate Editors of the Journal of Women’s History. She has many chapters in books and articles in journals and has co-edited several collections including (with Margaret Strobel) the four-volume collection Restoring Women to History: Women in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Middle East (Indiana University Press, 1999). Her 1997 book (co-authored with Nina Mba), For Women and the Nation: Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti of Nigeria (University of Illinois Press) is a study of women in anti-colonial struggle in southwestern Nigeria.  She is the author of  Women and Gender in Sub-Saharan Africa (American Historical Association with University of Illinois Press, 2007).

Mojubaolu Olufunke Okome is a Professor of Political Science at Brooklyn College (CUNY).  She was the Women’s Studies Program Director as well as Deputy Chair for Graduate Studies in the Department of Political Science at Brooklyn College. She authored A Sapped Democracy: The Political Economy of the Structural Adjustment Program and the Political Transition in Nigeria, 1983-1993.  MD: University Press of America, 1998. She is the founder and Editor of the online peer reviewed journal, Ìrìnkèrindò: a Journal of African Migration.  http://www.africamigration.com from 2002; and co-founder and until Spring 2010, one of three Co-editors of: Jenda: Journal of African Culture and Women Studies.  http://www.jendajournal.com 2000 to 2010.  She is currently working on two edited books, one on Transnational Africa and Globalization, and the other on State-Civil Society relations in Nigeria.  With Elisha Renne, she is also working on a book on Gender, Leadership and Power in the  Aladura Church in Nigeria and the U.S.  The focus is on the Eternal Sacred Order of the Cherubim and Seraphim.

Barbara Ransby is an historian, writer, and longtime political activist. Ransby has published dozens of articles and essays in popular and scholarly venues. She is most notably the author of an award-winning biography of civil rights activist Ella Baker, entitled Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Democratic Vision, (University of North Carolina, 2003). Barbara is currently working on two major research projects: a study of African American feminist organizations in the 1970s, and a political biography of Eslanda Cardozo Goode Robeson. She serves on the editorial board of the London-based journal, Race and Class, and a number of non-profit civic and media organizations.

Beverly Guy-Sheftall, Ph.D., is the founding director of the Women’s Research and Resource Center and the Anna Julia Cooper Professor of Women’s Studies. She is also adjunct professor at Emory University’s Institute for Women’s Studies where she teaches graduate courses. She has published a number of texts within African-American and women’s studies, including the first anthology on Black women’s literature, Sturdy Black Bridges: Visions of Black Women in Literature (Doubleday, 1980), which she co-edited with Roseann P. Bell and Bettye Parker Smith; her dissertation, Daughters of Sorrow: Attitudes Toward Black Women, 1880-1920 (Carlson, 1991); Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought (New Press, 1995); and an anthology she co-edited with Rudolph Byrd titled Traps: African American Men on Gender and Sexuality (Indiana University Press, 2001). Her most recent publication is a book coauthored with Johnnetta Betsch Cole, "Gender Talk: The Struggle for Women’s Equality in African American Communities" (Random House, 2003). In 1983, she became founding co-editor of Sage: A Scholarly Journal of Black Women that was devoted exclusively to the experiences of women of African descent.

Peyi Soyinka-Airewele is Professor of African and International Politics at Ithaca College. Her publications include Socio-Political Scaffolding and the Construction of Change, co-edited with Kelechi Kalu (Africa World Press, 2008),  Reframing Contemporary Africa, co-edited with Kiki Edozie (CQ Press 2009) and Invoking the Past, Conjuring the Nation.  She has served as the International Director of ACT Africa, the first female Vice-President and President of the Association of Third World Studies, Inc. Co Vice-President of the Ithaca City of Asylum, and is currently the President of the African Studies and Research Forum, Inc. Her current research engages the socio-political discourses of popular African cinema and their fluid interpretations of transforming identities and issues in global and local spaces.

Jeanne Theoharis is professor of political science at Brooklyn College and co-founder of Educators for Civil Liberties.  She is author or co-author of seven books and numerous articles, including the award-winning biography The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks which recently received an NAACP Image Award.   She has written extensively on women in the Black freedom struggle, particularly in the North, on the political uses of civil rights history, and on the contemporary politics of race and gender in social welfare, education, and the domestic War on Terror.

Michele Wallace is the author of Black Macho and The Myth of The Superwoman, a book in which she criticized black nationalism and sexism. Her writings on literature, art, film, and popular culture have been widely published and have made her a "leader of a [new] generation of African-American intellectuals." The cogency, focus, and insightfulness of Wallace's essays on visual culture and its relationship to race and gender is typified by "Modernism, Postmodernism and the Problem of the Visual in Afro-American Culture" and her afterword in the book Black Popular Culture (based on a groundbreaking conference organized by Wallace at The Studio Museum in Harlem in 1991): "Why Are There No Great Black Artists? The Problem of Visuality in African-American Culture". Her attention to the invisibility and/or fetishization of Black women in art, film, and television has inspired new critical thinking about race and gender in popular culture, particularly in what she has called "the gap around the psychoanalytic" in contemporary African-American critical discourse.