Nikhil Pal Singh (NYU), "Race, Crime and Police Power in the Making of US Empire"

MAR 28, 2014 | 2:00 PM

Details

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:

4406: English Student Lounge

WHEN:

March 28, 2014: 2:00 PM

ADMISSION:

Free

Description

This Mentoring Future Faculty of Color talk considers the historical importance of racialized criminality (and criminalized racial difference) within US imperial culture. It specifically examines how historical precedents of 'slave crime' and 'native crime' are foundational to the development of American legal thinking and security regimes built upon expansive conceptions (and indeed an expansionist blurring) of anticipatory policing and preventive war. It concludes with some reflections upon how these practices and precedents become transferred and translated within the post-WWII history of United States globalism and national security discourse.

This Mentoring Future Faculty of Color talk considers the historical importance of racialized criminality (and criminalized racial difference) within US imperial culture. It specifically examines how historical precedents of 'slave crime' and 'native crime' are foundational to the development of American legal thinking and security
regimes built upon expansive conceptions (and indeed an expansionist
blurring) of anticipatory policing and preventive war. It concludes with some
reflections upon how these practices and precedents become transferred
and translated within the post-WWII history of United States globalism and
national security discourse. - See more at: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Page-Elements/Academics-Research-Centers-Initiatives/Doctoral-Programs/English/Community#sthash.M2mR49cq.dpuf
This Mentoring Future Faculty of Color talk considers the historical importance of racialized criminality (and criminalized racial difference) within US imperial culture. It specifically examines how historical precedents of 'slave crime' and 'native crime' are foundational to the development of American legal thinking and security
regimes built upon expansive conceptions (and indeed an expansionist
blurring) of anticipatory policing and preventive war. It concludes with some
reflections upon how these practices and precedents become transferred
and translated within the post-WWII history of United States globalism and
national security discourse. - See more at: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Page-Elements/Academics-Research-Centers-Initiatives/Doctoral-Programs/English/Community#sthash.M2mR49cq.dpuf