Slavery and the Sweet Taste of Empire

SEP 18, 2014 | 6:00 PM TO 7:30 PM

Details

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:

C202

WHEN:

September 18, 2014: 6:00 PM-7:30 PM

CONTACT INFO:

/womencenter
212-817-8905

ADMISSION:

Free

Description

Thursday, September 18, 2014
6:00 - 7:30 pm
Room  C202
Slavery and the Sweet Taste of Empire
KIM HALL & JENNIFER MORGAN
 
Kim Hall is the Lucyle Hook Professor of English at Barnard College and Director of Africana Studies. Previously, she held the Thomas F.X. Mullarkey Chair of Literature at Fordham University. She has also taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Swarthmore College, and Georgetown University. Professor Hall's research and scholarship have been supported by the Folger Institute, the ACLS, and the Ford Foundation. She has also received an NEH/Newberry Fellowship. Professor Hall's first book, Things of Darkness, was named as an outstanding academic book by Choice magazine. She is currently working on a book, tentatively entitled Sweet Taste of Empire, which examines women, labor, and race in the Anglo-Caribbean sugar trade during the seventeenth century. She is also an avid quilter whose work has been exhibited in Maryland, Massachusetts, and New York.

Jennifer L. Morgan is a Professor of History in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis and the Department of History at New York University. Her research interests are Early American History, Comparative Slavery, Histories of Racial Ideology, and Women and Gender. Her book Laboring Women: Gender and Reproduction in New World Slavery, was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2004. She has published in Women’s Studies Quarterly and the Women and Mary Quarterly.She is currently a fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton where she is working on a manuscript that explores the connections between slavery, race, and numeracy in the early English Atlantic tentatively entitled Accounting for the Women in Slavery.  
 
Cosponsored with the Society for the Study of Women in the Renaissance.