FAQ

Admissions

Can I apply to a GC doctoral program and a GC master’s program?

Yes, but you may not apply to more than one doctoral program a semester.  

Can I apply to more than one doctoral program?

You may only apply to one program at a time in a current admissions cycle.  If you have received a decision for a doctoral program and wish to be considered for another program that still is accepting applications, you may do so.

How can I pay the admissions application fee?

After you have completed the online application form, you will be asked to submit the form for review.  A payment page will then appear asking you to select your payment method.  You may pay online with a credit card or by sending in a check by mail.

Can I request to waive the application fee?

The application fee is only waived for United States Armed Services Veterans and McNair Scholars.

To apply for these fee waivers, please select the "pay by mail/check" option when you submit your application. Then you need to notify the Office of Admissions via email that your application is complete, and that you are requesting a fee waiver (do not actually send a check). Please specify in the email if you are a veteran (attach documentation to the email) or a McNair Scholar (attach documentation).


 

If my transcripts are issued in a language other than English, what should I do?

Applicants who attended institutions that issue transcripts only in a non-English language format need to upload a file that contains an English translation from an certified translation service.  The scanned file also needs to contain the original document that the translation represents as well as the certified translation. 

What is an applicant statement?

A successful applicant statement usually does the following:

Articulates a particular topic area in which you propose to do research.
Positions your proposed project within an ongoing scholarly conversation (i.e. that you want to connect your work to existing work in the field, but build on it and add something new).
Argues for your project as urgent within the field and within academic studies.
Connects your scholarly passions to your personal motivations for taking on the work (this can take many forms).
Shows an awareness of your field, but can also be understood by people outside your field.
Shows how your academic background has prepared you to do this work.
Speaks to why you want to study in the GC's doctoral program specifically--not just in terms of the resources of the GC but also how you hope to contribute to this intellectual and pedagogical community.
Recounts your educational background that has led to the Ph.D. program or describes a professional position that has inspired further academic study.
Includes an appropriate amount of citational references (literary or rhetorical) that demonstrates your knowledge-base, interest, and investment in further research.
Explains a research agenda and how this program suits that academic goal or indicates how Ph.D. coursework will help focus some already existing (yet still evolving) interests.
Offers a rationale of how a Ph.D. program will enrich and fulfill your intellectual goals. 

What is the reapplication process if I have applied for admissions in the past?

First you need to submit a new application form and application fee for the current admissions cycle.  You will need to upload unofficial scans of your supporting documents to allow the program to review your application in a timely basis. And you are required to submit a new applicant statement. 

If you applied to the Graduate Center within the last two years, and are admitted to the program we may be able to retrieve the official copies that were sent in with your prior application. Those documents previously sent, however, cannot be used for the review process.

What transcripts do I need to list and upload for review?

Transcripts must be submitted from each college or university attended even if you did not complete a degree or did not enroll in courses in your current field.

This includes:
  • All credit bearing coursework even if that did not lead to a degree on a transcript from the issuing institution where the courses were originally taken.
  • All credit bearing coursework even if that was for a degree program unrelated to the discipline now being pursued.
  • All credit bearing coursework that may be in progress.  Transcripts that only list courses in progress for the current semester must still be uploaded for review, even if they do not yet contain grades for the current or most recent semester.
  • All coursework that was transferred to another institution must be also submitted on a transcript from the original issuing institution.
    • This includes community college coursework that was transferred to a 4-year degree program. The community college transcript must also be uploaded to the online application.
This does not include:
  • Credits from study abroad coursework or credits taken as part of AP or other high school college level coursework.
  • Coursework that was non-credit bearing or taken at non-academic institutions such as religious, career, or non-academic technical colleges. 

 

How do I upload an unofficial transcript if my institution does not provide unofficial copies?

If your institution does not provide an unofficial or online student copy of the transcript, then you need to request an official one to be sent to you.  That copy should be opened, scanned and uploaded into the online application form. You may want to request 2 copies from the issuing institution and keep one unopened, so that if you are admitted you will have an official copy available to forward to the Office of Admission prior to registration. Only admitted applicants are required to send an official transcript. 

How do I upload pdf files that are more than 4MB?

To ensure that your file is smaller than the maximum size, you may have to scan your file at the lowest DPI that produces a legible image. In most cases, you will be able to use a DPI under 200.

Do not scan in color. Use grey scale if possible; otherwise, use black and white.

If the file already exists as a download from your institution, please take a look at this Adobe page with instructions that can assist you in reducing the size of an existing pdf file .  http://acrobatusers.com/tutorials/reducing-file-size
 
For all Journalism writing samples, if the size absolutely cannot be reduced to less than 4MB, then upload one document with a url/link to a hosted file. 

Who should be my recommenders if I've been out of school for many years?

If at all possible, you should furnish academic letters of recommendtiaon - in other words, letters from professors who have had you in class and can speak to your strenghts as a student and a scholar.  If you absolutely cannot obtain academic letters, then professional letters of recommendation may be submitted.  

 

Can I send recommendations from Interfolio

We do not accept recommendations that are not uploaded into our online application system.  Please select recommenders who can upload recommendations into our online system in order to ensure a timely review of your application. 

How can I remind recommenders to submit their recommendation?

After you have submitted your online application, you can remind your recommenders to submit their online recommendation by logging back into the online application system.  At the dashboard (the first screen you will see upon logging back in) click on the blue button on the upper right hand side that says "View Application." 

Then on the left hand navigation bar, you will see a link to "Recommendations" under the "Important Links" header.  That will bring you to a button that says "Recommendation Provider List" where you can resend the request to previously listed recommenders. 

The system does not allow you to add additional recommenders or to correct/modify and email address of a recommender.  Those requests should be made by email to admissions@gc.cuny.edu with the understanding that you may have a significant delay in the processing of your application due to an issue with the recommender emails that you have listed prior to submitting your application. 

Do I need to take the GRE if I already have a master's degree?

If you are applying for a doctoral degree (with the exception of the Social Welfare PhD), you will need to take the GRE General exam regardless of whether or not you have already obtained a master's degree.  Certain programs require or recommend the GRE Subject test in addition to the General test.  Please refer to the deadline chart for details. 

I took the GRE more than five years ago, will you accept it? .

GRE General and Subject exam scores are valid for five years.  You will need to take the test again if your scores are older than five years. 

Do I need to take the TOEFL or IELTS exam?

An applicant must submit scores from either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) unless they have a post-secondary degree from an institution in which the language of instruction is English-only and located in a country that recognizes English as an Official Language. Please note applicant's who have only studied in Puerto Rico or India must complete the TOEFL or IELTS.  

The TOEFL test is administered internationally by Educational Testing Service and you need to request that ETS report examination results directly to College Code 2113.

The IELTS test is administered by Cambridge English Language Assessment.  


IELTS (International English Language Testing System)

What is the minimum GRE/GMAT/TOEFL/IELTS score?

There are no minimum scores that guarantee admission.  Each program takes into consideration all the elements of an application. 

If my intended program requests a writing sample, how do I submit it?

Please submit writing samples by uploading them into the online application system. Please be sure to include your full name and date of birth on the writing sample.

Can any of my supporting documents arrive after the deadline?

All supporting documents need to have been uploaded to the online application system by the program's deadline. 

How can I apply for scholarship and fellowship opportunities?

All doctoral applicants are automatically considered for all school based funding (including scholarships, fellowships, and assistantships) when you submit your completed application.

What are tuition and fee costs?

The current tuition and fee costs can be found here.

What is the Graduate Center’s institutional code for the GRE/TOEFL/GMAT?

The institutional code for the GRE and the TOEFL is 2113.
The institutional code for the GMAT is XWT-S7-47.

What is the transfer of credit process?

On average, programs do not accept more than 15 transfer credits.  However, each case is reviewed individually and transfer credits will only be evaluated if you are admitted to a program and after you have begun the registration process.

When is my application due?

The admissions deadlines for each program are listed on our deadline page. Please note that different programs have different deadlines.

On the online application, the LookUp screen I can't locate an institution

For institutions within the United States, the most effective method of locating institutions using this screen is to type in only the CITY field. If you cannot locate the institution by CITY, then type in only the NAME field. If that does not result in locating the institution, please type in "Undelcared" in the NAME field and select "Undeclared Domestic" as the institution.

For institutions outside of the United States, please search first by selecting only CITY. If that does not result in locating the institution, search only by NATION field. If that does not result in locating the institution, please select "Nation: Foreign Inst" for that country. (For example, if you are searching for a Canadian institution that does not appear on the list for Canada, select "Canada: Foreign Inst")

Alumni

Can GC alumni use the Mina Rees Library?

Can GC alumni use the Graduate Center Mina Rees Library?
GC alumni are extended free lifetime access to the Graduate Center Mina Rees Library with a valid GC alumni card. Get your GC alumni card from the Security Office, room 9124; 212-817-7777. With this card, alumni enjoy borrowing privileges from the GC library and on-site access to the full set of GC Library databases, ebooks, and other e-resources.

In addition, the GC Library sponsors a limited set of GC Library e-resources for off-site use. Alumni must register for free access to GC alumni library resources.

If you have registered, and you forget your alumni library userid and password, contact gcalumni@gc.cuny.edu.
 

Does the Graduate Center offer Dossier Services?

Yes, the Graduate Center has partnered with the credentials management service, Interfolio Inc., to offer current and former students a more efficient and effective way of managing dossier files. Interfolio is the easiest and most affordable way to store and deliver application materials. For more information, please visit the website at http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Prospective-Current-Students/Student-Life/Resources. Please contact the Office of Student Affairs at 212-817-7400 or by email studentaffairs@gc.cuny.edu for more information about this service.

How do I audit courses at the Graduate Center?

Anyone can audit courses at the Graduate Center. Please contact the Registrar's Office at 212-817-7500 or by email at registrar@gc.cuny.edu for more information.

How do I obtain a GC alumni ID card?

To obtain a Graduate Center alumni ID card, please contact the Security Office at 212-817-7777 or visit their office (room 9124) on the 9th floor of the Graduate Center.

How do I obtain an official transcript?

Students submit the Transcript Request form to the Office of the Registrar for processing. The transcript fee is $7.00 USD per transcript with the exception of transcripts that are sent directly to CUNY Colleges which is free of charge.

  • The transcript fee is payable by cash in person at the Bursar’s Office, personal check, money order, or online payment. Please make checks or money orders payable to GSUC/CUNY.
  • Students using the non-instructional fee online payment method must attach their Bursar payment receipt along with the transcript request form.

Transcript requests are generally processed within 2-4 business days. After submitting the transcript request, students may track their transcript request status using their Self-Service Banner account. A transcript will not be sent if the student has any holds on record (i.e. Bursar, Library, Financial Aid, etc.). The hold must be cleared before any transcript can be sent.

Please contact the Office of the Registrar at 212-817-7500 or by email at registrar@gc.cuny.edu if you have any other transcript related questions.

How do I stay in contact with other GC alumni?

You can sign up for the Graduate Center's Alumni Online Directory: Click Here. There you can search for other alumni. The Alumni Online Directory is a member driven system. Members control the amount of information they wish to share. Any information that is displayed in the alumni directory is privileged and only shared with other GC alumni.

How do I update my address or share news about myself?

The easiest way to update your contact information is join the Graduate Center Online Community. Once you become a member, you can update your profile. You may also contact us at 212-817-7130 or by email at gcalumni@gc.cuny.edu.

To share news about you with Graduate Center community such as new book publications, academic or professional achievements, and other interesting stories, please email us pubaff@gc.cuny.edu.

Where I do purchase academic or commencement gowns?

Academic or commencement gowns can be purchased from the Office of Special Events at the Graduate Center. Please contact them at 212-817-7150 or by email at specialevents@gc.cuny.edu to inquire about prices, measurements and other specifications.

Audiology

Where can I get my hearing tested?

What does an audiologic evaluation entail?

Partial List of Services Available:

  • Basic hearing test

  • Custom hearing protectors

  • Hearing aid checks, hearing aid counseling

  • Testing hearing of children

  • Counseling regarding communication strategies and hearing assistive technologies

How can I make an appointment?

For Hunter College Communication Disorders Center:
N133 (North Building)
425 East 25th Street
Call (212) 481-4464

Or visit Hunter College
For Brooklyn College Speech and Hearing Center:
2900 Bedford Avenue
4400 Boylan Hall
Brooklyn, NY
Call (718) 951-5186

Or Visit Brooklyn College
For Graduate Center:
365 Fifth Avenue
Room 7306
New York, New York

Call (212) 817-7980 and ask to make appointment

What is the difference between the licensure Post-bachelor's track and the non-licensure Post-master's track?

Post-Bachelor’s Track:
Au.D degree is awarded by the Graduate Center, CUNY. Courses are taught throughout the three campuses including The Graduate Center, Brooklyn College, and Hunter College Brookdale Campus with a larger percent of courses taught at The Graduate Center. Clinical practica during the first two years (Spring of first year through Spring of second year) take place at the Speech and Hearing Centers at the Brooklyn and Hunter College clinics and Hearing Science Laboratory at The Graduate Center. Externship placements provide students with opportunities at world-renowned medical centers and clinical facilities in a diverse multicultural, multiethnic population in the New York Metropolitan area. 
Each year we admit a relatively small cohort of student, allowing us to ensure an outstanding faculty-to-student ratio. You will work closely with nationally and internationally renowned faculty in audiology which allows for the development of academic and personal relationships.

Post -Masters Track:
The Au.D. degree for ASHA certified or State-Licensed Audiologists is awarded by the Graduate Center, CUNY. Courses are offered in the evening at each of the three campuses including The Graduate Center, Brooklyn College, and Hunter College Brookdale Campus. The program incorporates comprehensive academic training under a nationally and internationally recognized doctoral faculty.

The specific goal of the Masters to Doctoral program for ASHA certified or State-Licensed Audiologists is to offer advanced clinical doctoral education to enhance their clinical knowledge and skills so that:

  1. They can better meet the audiologic needs of the culturally,
    linguistically, and socioeconomically diverse population using evidence-based practice.

  2. They can become active contributors to the clinical science that subserves Audiology and commit to the continuing development of the profession

What is an Au.D. Program?

An Au.D. program is a program that leads to the Au.D. degree, a clinical doctoral degree in the practice of audiology.

Why has CUNY developed an Au.D. Program?

The field of audiology has moved from a master’s degree to a doctoral degree as an entry-level academic requirement.  That is, the preferred degree in audiology, according to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, is  the Au.D. degree, which is a clinical audiology doctoral degree.  In response to this change, the City University of New York (CUNY) has developed an Au.D. Program that is a joint enterprise among the Graduate Center, Brooklyn College, and Hunter College.

The CUNY Au.D. Program is taught by academic and clinical faculty from the CUNY schools.  The clinical facilities are located at Brooklyn College (2900 Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn) and Hunter College (425 East 25th Street in Manhattan) and The Graduate Center (365 Fifth Avenue at 34th Street in Manhattan) campuses.

When did the CUNY Au.D. Program start?

The CUNY Au.D. program began in September, 2005.

What is the accreditation status of the CUNY Au.D. Program?

The consortial doctoral (Au.D) education program in audiology at City University of New York Graduate Center, Brooklyn College, and Hunter College is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology (CAA) of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard #310, Rockville, Maryland 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700.
 

Can I become an audiologist with a master's degree in Audiology?

In June, 2004, the council on Academic Accreditation of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology (CAA) announced that it will no longer accredit master's degree programs after December 31, 2006.  After that time ,the CAA will accredit only those programs that award doctoral level degrees in Audiology.  The CUNY Au.D. Program complies with these CAA accreditation mandates.

What does an audiologist do?

Audiologists are health professionals who are involved in the diagnosis and management of auditory and balance systems disorders. Audiologists typically:

  • Perform diagnostic evaluations of the outer, middle and inner ears, auditory pathways to the brain, and vestibular systems
  • Manage the rehabilitative processes of children and adults with hearing and balance disorders

In addition, audiologists may:

  • Assess situations in which hearing and balance may be jeopardized and design intervention to hearing loss

  • Prepare future professionals to practice in colleges, universities, schools, medical clinics and in private practice

  • Manage agencies, clinics or private practices

  • Engage in research to enhance knowledge about normal hearing, and the evaluation and treatment of hearing disorders.

  • Design hearing instruments and testing equipment

  • Dispense amplification devices (e.g. hearing aids, alerting devices) which promote improved communication and safety

  • Work as part of a cochlear implant team to assist individuals with severe to profound hearing loss

Where does an audiologist work?

Audiologists provide services and work in many different types of facilities:


Acute care hospitals


Military

Colleges and Universities

Music Industry

Community hearing and speech centers

Nursing Homes

Community outpatient clinics

Physicians' offices

Educational settings such as public and private schools

Private practice offices

Health departments

Rehabilitation centers

Hearing-aid companies

Research Laboratories

Industry with hearing conservation programs

Specialized schools

Long-term care and residential facilities

State and federal government agencies
Veteran's Administration

What is the employment outlook for an Audiologist?

Employment of audiologists is expected to grow 34 percent from 2012 to 2022. Because hearing loss is strongly associated with aging, rapid growth in the population age 55 and older will cause the number of persons with hearing impairment to increase markedly. (Excerpted from: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/audiologists.htm#tab-6).

How long is the Au.D. degree program?

The curriculum is 97 credits, and can be completed over a four year period.  This includes a clinical residency during the 4th year.  After graduation, each degree candidate will be able to apply for New York State licensure and national certification. The Au.D. Program is a full-time Program - students cannot take courses in the Program as part-time students.

What is the Capstone Project?

Examples of completed Capstone Projects include the following:


Reliability and Validity of the Hearing Aid Skills Questionnaire

Acoustic Radiation and Bone-Conduction Testing

The Acoustic Change Complex: An Investigation of Stimulus Presentation Rate in Infants

Prevalence of Auditory Neuropathy/Dys-synchrony in Children with Hearing Loss

Hearing Impairment, Cognitive Status, and Quality of Life in the Elderly: A Systematic Literature Review

The Relationship Between the Magnitude of Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions and Acoustic Reflex Thresholds for Broadband Noise for Older Adults

The purpose of the Capstone Project is to provide students with exposure to the process and value of conducting research. The project may take several forms including research-based investigations in clinical or basic science areas; research on evidence-based practice; survey research of best practices; research on the scholarship of the teaching/learning process; efficacy studies; prospective or retrospective studies; critical literature reviews of topics relevant to clinical practice formatted possibly as a viewpoint article; clinical protocols based on a thorough review of published research relevant to the protocol; grant proposal with pilot data and prepared using the format of the granting agency to which they wish to send the proposal; and psychometric studies of measuring instruments to be used in screening or in outcomes research.
Where are the facilities for the CUNY Au.D. Program?

Because of the unique aspects and diverse faculty of this city-wide program, classroom learning takes place in Brooklyn and Manhattan, depending on the specific course offered each semester.  Clinical instruction and services take place at the Brooklyn College Speech and Hearing Center and the Hunter College Center for Communication Disorders and the Graduate Center Hearing Science Laboratory.  All sites have sound-treated test suites, and behavioral audiologic test equipment, acoustic immittance measurement equipment, and digital amplification technology (including a real-ear probe tube microphone measurement system).  The Brooklyn College Speech and Hearing Center has a hearing-aid dispensary, and Hunter College Center for Communication Disorders and the Graduate Center Hearing Science Laboratory have hearing aid laboratories. The Brooklyn College and Hunter College Centers have auditory evoked potentials and otoacoustic emissions systems. Brooklyn College and Hunter College Centers and The Graduate Center Laboratory have assistive listening devices. Auditory processing disorders testing is done at the Hunter College Center.

What is The Graduate Center Tuition?

Please click here for tuition information.

Please Note: All fees and tuition charges are subject to change by action of the Board of Trustees of The City University of New York without prior notice

How do I apply?

The online admissions application is available here.

When is the deadline to apply?

Information regarding the application deadline for admissions for matriculation into the AuD Program for the Fall semester is available here.

When and where is the next information session being held?

Whom should I contact if I have questions about the Au.D. Program?

  • John P. Preece, Ph.D., CCC-A Executive Officer, Au.D. Program, Graduate Center, CUNY: jpreece@gc.cuny.edu

 

What is the CUNY post master’s degree Au.D. Program?

The CUNY Au.D. Program incorporates a 31-credit-hour sequence consisting of a core sequence of three courses, an elective sequence of eight courses and a capstone research project oriented toward the student’s clinical or theoretical interests. Students work in close consultation with members of the doctoral faculty to complete this project. It is our hope that the capstone research experience enhances the clinician’s capacity both as a critical thinker and as a consumer of audiologic research.

Why has CUNY developed an Au.D. Program for ASHA certified or State Licensed Audiologists?

The Au.D. Program replaces the master’s degree programs of Brooklyn College and Hunter College. The last master’s degree students graduated from these colleges prior to December, 2006, as mandated by ASHA. The transition from master’s degree-level for the practice of clinical Audiology to a clinical doctorate is consistent with the new standards for professional education adopted by the CAA, to take effect January 1, 2012.

When did the CUNY Au.D. Program for Audiology Clinicians with a Master’s Degree begin?

The program was approved by the New York State Education Dept. in September, 2006. The CUNY Au.D. Program accepted its first class in Spring, 2007 (the application deadline for Fall admission is February 1).

What are the goals of the CUNY post master’s degree Au.D Program?

To enhance the clinical knowledge and skills of practitioners so that:

  • They can better meet the hearing health-care needs of the culturally, linguistically, and socioeconomically diverse population of individuals with hearing impairment and vestibular disorders

  • They can become active contributors to the clinical science that subserves Audiology and commit to the continuing development of the profession

  • They can be more competitive with graduates from traditional Au.D. Programs in the current and future job market.

How long is the Au.D. post master’s degree program?

The 31-credit program is designed to be completed on a part-time basis over a four year period. It can be completed over a shorter time period if the student chooses a full-time schedule.

What are the graduation requirements?

All CUNY Au.D. students with Masters Degrees who are Professionally Certified or Licensed are required to take:

  • AuD 71600: Physiological Acoustics (3 credits)
  • AuD 76500: Audiologic Research Proposal (3 credits)
  • AuD 78000: Audiologic Research (1 credits)

(Although students must enroll in AuD 78000 for each semester that the capstone  research project remains incomplete, the course can be counted only once towards the 31-credit requirement).
Note: AuD 71800: Introduction to Research Methods is a prerequisite for AuD 76500 if this or a comparable course was not taken at the masters level.
For the remaining 24 credits, the student can elect (in cosultation with the faculty adviser), any combination of the following courses:

  • AuD 72000: Multicultural Issues for Audiologists

  • AuD 72500: Noise Induced Hearing Loss and Hearing Conservation

  • AuD 74200: Auditory Evoked Responses

  • AuD 74800: Amplification II

  • AuD 75000: Counseling

  • AuD 76000: Medical Audiology

  • AuD 76300: Vestibular & Tinnitus Evaluation and Management

  • AuD 77000: Cochlear Implants & Other Sensory Aids

  • AuD 77200: Auditory Processing Disorders

  • AuD 77400: Hearing & Aging

  • AuD 77600: Seminar in Professional Practices – Business Practice

Students must also complete a Capstone research project.
What are the types of clinical research projects?
In the past, student's Capstone projects have included the following:


Reliability and Validity of the Hearing Aid Skills Questionnaire

Acoustic Radiation and Bone-Conduction Testing

The Acoustic Change Complex: An Investigation of Stimulus Presentation Rate in Infants

Prevalence of Auditory Neuropathy/Dys-synchrony in Children with Hearing Loss

Hearing Impairment, Cognitive Status, and Quality of Life in the Elderly: A Systematic Literature Review

The Relationship Between the Magnitude of Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions and Acoustic Reflex Thresholds for Broadband Noise for Older Adults

 

Whom should I contact if I have questions about the post master’s degree Au.D. Program?

 

  • John P. Preece, Ph.D., CCC-A  Executive Officer, Au.D. Program, Graduate Center, CUNY: jpreece@gc.cuny.edu
     

Certificate Programs - Women's Studies

Counseling Services

How does psychotherapy work?

There are different techniques of psychotherapy, but they all share some common elements. Therapy provides the opportunity to talk in confidence with a skilled and empathic listener who can help to identify and understand the problem and then seek out ways to approach it. Through this process, people can come to recognize a greater range of possibilities in their lives, and feel more effective and fulfilled in love and work.

Who provides the Student Counseling Services?

The Wellness Center Student Counseling Services is staffed by licensed psychologists, postdoctoral fellows and advanced doctoral students in clinical psychology.

Who uses Student Counseling Services?

The Wellness Center offers Student Counseling Services to all matriculated graduate students registered at the Graduate Center. We see several hundred students each year for consultations, individual counseling and/or groups and workshops. Students who seek our services represent the rich diversity of cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds that exist at the Graduate Center. We welcome all students, including international students and veterans, and we are LGBTQ-friendly. We are also available to individual departments, to participate in workshops on topics such as dissertation completion.

Why counseling for graduate students?

Over many years of offering counseling services to graduate students, we have found that counseling can help significantly in addressing a wide range of difficulties, including anxiety, depression, relationship problems and work-related problems. We are experienced in recognizing the unique challenges that graduate students can face at this phase in their lives.

What counseling services are available through the Wellness Center?

Student Counseling Services offers short-term individual counseling, psychotherapy, couples counseling, consultations and referrals. We also offer three ongoing groups, Challenges of Graduate Student Life, the Dissertation Completion Group and the LGBTQ Graduate Student Support Group, which meet weekly throughout the academic year. In addition to counseling services, we offer dissertation support through a series of individual consultations to help identify problems in moving forward on the dissertation and find solutions to obstacles. We also provide a workshop series on a variety of topics relevant to graduate student life.

Are the Student Counseling Services confidential?

All services offered through the Wellness Center Student Counseling Services are strictly confidential. We believe that confidentiality is essential to establishing an atmosphere of safety and trust. Information about you or your participation in our services is not shared with academic departments or other administrative offices. In rare situations in which there is the potential for harm to self or others, appropriate steps are taken to maintain safety for all concerned. A full confidentiality statement is available in the Wellness Center, Room 6422.

Does Student Counseling Services charge for its services?

All services are free of charge to matriculated students registered at the Graduate Center, CUNY.

Does Student Counseling Services provide medications?

Student Counsleing Services does not provide medications for psychiatric or psychological difficulties at this time. However, we ensure that students who may need medication are referred to the appropriate psychiatric services outside the Graduate Center.

Criminal Justice

Q: Are there funding opportunities available for students?

A: Yes, every fulltime student in our Program receives a stipend and tuition remission. Beginning 2012-2013, incoming students will receive a stipend up to $25,000 per year and health insurance. Students are required as part of the fellowship to TA and/or teach one class each semester in years 2 - 5. Extra financial assistance is available through fellowships, grants, assistantships, traineeships, loans, and Federal Work-Study Program assignments. Please visit the Graduate Center’s financial aid website for information about fellowships and stipends.

Q: Can I work full-time while attending the program?

A: The policy, oversight and administration (POA) specialization is geared for individuals who expect to remain employed.  However, all students must be registered for 7 credits per semester.  Most courses are offered in the late afternoon or evening.

Q: Can I start coursework in January instead of September?

A: No, you may only begin attending courses in the Fall semester after you are accepted.

Q: Can I take classes as a non-matriculating student?

A: No, we do not accept any non-matriculated students.

Q: Can I use some of my graduate degree credits towards my required PhD program credits?

A: Students who have taken course work beyond a bachelor's degree at another accredited institution may request to have these credits transferred, up to a total of 15 credits for criminal justice students and up to a total of 29 credits for policy, oversight and administration specialization (POA). The principle for accepting such credits toward the requirements of the Program is that they replicate course work that would ordinarily be taken in this Program. It is the determination of EO whether courses are eligible for transfer. Only courses in which students have received a grade of B or higher are eligible for transfer.

Q: Do I have to have a Master's degree to apply to the PhD program?

A: No, you do not have to have a Master’s degree. However, you may earn your Master’s degree while pursuing your doctoral work.

Q: Do I have to have previous experience in criminal justice?

A: Some background in criminology, criminal justice, sociology, psychology, or other related fields is strongly preferred, but not required.

Q: Do I have to take the GRE's?

A: Yes, all applicants are required to submit their GRE scores with the application packet. This is true even for students who have taken other standardized exams such as the LSATs. The GRE Code for the Graduate Center is 2113 and the Criminal Justice Program Code is 2202. GRE exams can be arranged by calling 1-800-GRE-CALL. Applicants can upload a copy of the personal score card that they personally receive directly to their online admissions application as part of the duplicate application (official scores must be sent by ETS to the Graduate Center at the code above NOT John Jay College).

Q: What GRE scores do I need?

A: Though the program does not have a “cut off” GRE score, we rarely consider any applicants with GREs under 1000. Students should score above a 50th percentile or must have an exceptional record to be accepted.  Please view the conversion chart for the new GRE scores.  We do not require any specific GRE test.

Q: How do I apply to the PhD program?

A: Detailed instructions on applying to the program can be found on the Graduate Center Admissions official page here.  You may call 212-817-7470 or e-mail your request to: admission@gc.cuny.edu. The CUNY Graduate Center application process is self-managed. Responsibility for gathering required documents such as official transcripts and letters of recommendation rest with the applicant. The GRE Institution Code is 2113.  Completed application forms, transcripts, test scores, and all other supporting material must be submitted to the Graduate Center Admissions Office.

Q: How long will it take me to earn my PhD?

A: The amount of time required to complete the doctorate can vary widely — depending on a student's level of preparation at the time of enrollment, the nature of the dissertation project, work commitments, and other demands on students' time. Criminal Justic core students with a higher degree (e.g., MA, MS, MPA, JD) generally complete the coursework and “qualifying” exams within two years. Most students generally take another 2-3 years to complete the dissertation and oral exams. Students are required to complete the degree within 8 years.

Please review the timeline on Path(s) to Degree

Q: How much is tuition?

A: For up-to-date tuition costs, please visit this Graduate Center Tuition & Fees.

Q: Is preference given to John Jay students?

A: No. The Admissions Committee considers all candidates, domestically and internationally, equally regardless of academic affiliation.

Q: Is study online a possibility?

A: No. The doctoral program does not offer a degree on line, nor do we offer online courses. In order to pursue the Criminal Justice Doctorate you must be in residence for your coursework.

Q: What can I do with a PhD in Criminal Justice?

A: The overall orientation of the program is to develop academics with a strong understanding of theory, methods and the criminal justice system. The program provides students with a strong foundation in the understanding of how to conduct independent research in the field, to serve as research and teaching faculty in universities, colleges, and research institutes, and to function as practitioners in a broad range of settings.

Q: What GPA do I need?

A: Consideration for admission into the Ph.D. program is based on the applicant's completion of a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university, with a cumulative overall GPA of at least 3.00 (B) on a scale of 4.00. Applicants with a Master's degree should have a 3.50 GPA in their graduate work. However, competitive applicants often have substantially higher GPAs, particularly in graduate work. Special consideration is given to masters level work in research methods and statistics.

Q: What is the curriculum like?

A: Students must complete one year of core course in criminological theory, criminal justice process and policy, research methods and statistics. Students may then choose electives from a broad range of topics, including international and comparative criminal justice, theory, policy, terrorism, policing and advanced methods and statistics.

Q: What is the deadline for the application for admission?

A: The deadline for submitting an application is January 1st. Detailed instructions on applying to the program can be found on the CUNY Graduate Center Admissions official page here.  You may call 212-817-7470 or e-mail your request to: admissions@gc.cuny.edu.

Q: Who are the faculty and what are their interests?

A: Our faculty represent a variety of disciplines and interests related to criminal justice, broadly defined. For a complete list of faculty and their interests, please visit the faculty webpage.

Q: Who are the faculty and what are their specializations?

Faculty by specializations

Financial Assistance

How do doctoral students apply for fellowships?

Accepted students are automatically assigned a fellowship by their doctoral program. There is no application for the five-year fellowships.

How do doctoral students apply for fellowships?

Accepted students are automatically assigned a fellowship by their doctoral program. There is no application for the five-year fellowships.

How do doctoral students apply for federal aid?

Students who would like to be considered for federal aid must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The easiest way to file is online. In order to file a FAFSA, students will need to create a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID online. International students are not eligible for federal aid.
 
The FAFSA asks for demographic information about the student and the student’s spouse (if applicable) and their financial situation within the prior tax year.  For more information on what documentation is needed to complete the FAFSA, please visit: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/fafsa/filling-out.
 
The Graduate Center (GC) begins reviewing new FAFSAs in late May/early June prior to the start of the academic year. A student may be contacted if additional information is needed to complete his or her application. Students will automatically be considered for Federal Perkins loans and Federal Work Study based on their FAFSA data. Students who are interested in applying for Direct Loans (Unsubsidized Stafford or Graduate PLUS), must also complete a Federal Direct Unsubsidized/Grad Plus Loan Request Form and submit it to the Office of Financial Aid.

How do doctoral students apply for federal aid?

Students who would like to be considered for federal aid must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The easiest way to file is online. In order to file a FAFSA, students will need to create a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID online. International students are not eligible for federal aid.
 
The FAFSA asks for demographic information about the student and the student’s spouse (if applicable) and their financial situation within the prior tax year.  For more information on what documentation is needed to complete the FAFSA, please visit: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/fafsa/filling-out.
 
The Graduate Center (GC) begins reviewing new FAFSAs in late May/early June prior to the start of the academic year. A student may be contacted if additional information is needed to complete his or her application. Students will automatically be considered for Federal Perkins loans and Federal Work Study based on their FAFSA data. Students who are interested in applying for Direct Loans (Unsubsidized Stafford or Graduate PLUS), must also complete a Federal Direct Unsubsidized/Grad Plus Loan Request Form and submit it to the Office of Financial Aid.

How do masters students apply for federal aid?

Students (excluding international students) who would like to be considered for federal aid must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The easiest way to file is online. In order to file a FAFSA, you will need to create a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID.
 
The FAFSA asks for demographic information about the student and the student’s spouse (if applicable) and their financial situation within the prior tax year. For more information on what documentation is needed to complete the FAFSA, please visit: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/fafsa/filling-out.
 
The GC begins reviewing new FAFSAs in late May/early June prior to the start of the academic year. A student may be contacted if additional information is needed to complete their application. Students will automatically be considered for Federal Perkins loans and Federal Work Study based on their FAFSA data. Students who are interested in applying for Federal Direct Loans (Unsubsidized Stafford or Graduate PLUS), must also complete a Federal Direct Unsubsidized/Grad Plus Loan Request Form and submit it to the Office of Financial Aid.

How do masters students apply for federal aid?

Students (excluding international students) who would like to be considered for federal aid must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The easiest way to file is online. In order to file a FAFSA, you will need to create a Federal Student Aid (FSA) ID.
 
The FAFSA asks for demographic information about the student and the student’s spouse (if applicable) and their financial situation within the prior tax year. For more information on what documentation is needed to complete the FAFSA, please visit: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/fafsa/filling-out.
 
The GC begins reviewing new FAFSAs in late May/early June prior to the start of the academic year. A student may be contacted if additional information is needed to complete their application. Students will automatically be considered for Federal Perkins loans and Federal Work Study based on their FAFSA data. Students who are interested in applying for Federal Direct Loans (Unsubsidized Stafford or Graduate PLUS), must also complete a Federal Direct Unsubsidized/Grad Plus Loan Request Form and submit it to the Office of Financial Aid.

What is a loan servicer?

A loan servicer is the company that collects payments, responds to customer service inquiries, and performs other administrative tasks associated with student loans on behalf of a lender. If a borrower has questions about repayment or his or her options, the servicer is often the best resource. Borrowers must make sure that loan servicers always have accurate contact information to avoid missing payments because of a lost bill.

What is the FAFSA deadline?

Students who would like to be considered for all types of financial aid should file the FAFSA by our priority deadline, April 30th. If the student is only interested in borrowing Direct Loans, he or she should file their FAFSA by November 20th for the fall semester and April 15th for the spring semester. The student will still also need to file a Federal Direct Unsubsidized/Grad Plus Loan Request Form.

What is the FAFSA deadline?

Students who would like to be considered for all types of financial aid should file the FAFSA by our priority deadline, April 30th. If the student is only interested in borrowing Direct Loans, he or she should file their FAFSA by November 20th for the fall semester and April 15th for the spring semester. The student will still also need to file a Federal Direct Unsubsidized/Grad Plus Loan Request Form.

Who is eligible for federal aid?

Most students, with the exception of international students, are eligible to receive financial aid from the federal government to help pay for graduate school. A student’s age, race, or field of study won’t affect his or her eligibility for federal student aid. While income is taken into consideration, it does not automatically prevent a student from getting federal student aid. For more specific details on who qualifies, please visit: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/eligibility/infographic-accessible
 
In order to be eligible for federal student aid, a student must be registered at least half-time (6 credits/WIUs). Courses taken as a non-matriculated student and/or audited courses do not count toward a student’s eligibility to receive federal student aid.

Who is eligible for federal aid?

Most students, with the exception of international students, are eligible to receive financial aid from the federal government to help pay for graduate school. A student’s age, race, or field of study won’t affect his or her eligibility for federal student aid. While income is taken into consideration, it does not automatically prevent a student from getting federal student aid. For more specific details on who qualifies, please visit: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/eligibility/infographic-accessible
 
In order to be eligible for federal student aid, a student must be registered at least half-time (6 credits/WIUs). Courses taken as a non-matriculated student and/or audited courses do not count toward a student’s eligibility to receive federal student aid.

When should I file my FAFSA?

The FAFSA becomes available January 1st for the following academic year. It is highly recommended that students apply by our April 30th  priority deadline.

Do I need to wait until I am admitted to file the FAFSA?

No, though no financial aid offers can be made until the student is admitted. The FAFSA becomes available January 1st for the following academic year. It is highly recommended that students apply by our April 30th  priority deadline, even if they have not received an admissions decision.

How will I be notified of my financial aid offer?

When the award becomes available or a change is made to the award, an email will be sent to the student’s GC email address. New doctoral students will also receive a paper financial aid award letter. All financial aid offers will be available to view in Banner. 

How will I be notified of my financial aid offer?

When the award becomes available or a change is made to the award, an email will be sent to the student’s GC email address. New doctoral students will also receive a paper financial aid award letter. All financial aid offers will be available to view in Banner. 

Do I need to apply for financial aid each year?

Doctoral Students who have received a GC Fellowship will have their fellowship automatically renewed each year, provided they are registered full-time and making satisfactory academic progress.
 
Students must apply for federal aid each academic year. In order to be considered for as much aid as possible, students should apply by the priority deadline, April 30th. Students who are only interested in Federal Direct Loans (Unsubsidized Stafford or Graduate PLUS) can file the FAFSA up until one month before the semester ends. Students interested in Federal Direct Loans must also complete the Federal Direct Unsubsidized/Grad Plus Loan Request Form annually.

Do I need to apply for financial aid each year?

Doctoral Students who have received a GC Fellowship will have their fellowship automatically renewed each year, provided they are registered full-time and making satisfactory academic progress.
 
Students must apply for federal aid each academic year. In order to be considered for as much aid as possible, students should apply by the priority deadline, April 30th. Students who are only interested in Federal Direct Loans (Unsubsidized Stafford or Graduate PLUS) can file the FAFSA up until one month before the semester ends. Students interested in Federal Direct Loans must also complete the Federal Direct Unsubsidized/Grad Plus Loan Request Form annually.

What types of aid are available to doctoral students?

All incoming doctoral students will be admitted with a five-year fellowship. Fellowships typically include a minimum of tuition coverage, though many fellowships also include a stipend and/or assistantship. For information on the different fellowships available, please visit: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Prospective-Current-Students/Current-Students/Financial-Assistance/Fellowships-and-Grants.
 
Doctoral students (excluding international students who are not eligible for federal aid) who file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) will also be considered for federal aid. Graduate students may be eligible for Federal Direct Loans - Unsubsidized Stafford or Graduate PLUS,- Federal Perkins Loans and/or Federal Work Study. For more information on these types of aid, please see the relevant subsections of this FAQ.

What types of aid are available to doctoral students?

All incoming doctoral students will be admitted with a five-year fellowship. Fellowships typically include a minimum of tuition coverage, though many fellowships also include a stipend and/or assistantship. For information on the different fellowships available, please visit: http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Prospective-Current-Students/Current-Students/Financial-Assistance/Fellowships-and-Grants.
 
Doctoral students (excluding international students who are not eligible for federal aid) who file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) will also be considered for federal aid. Graduate students may be eligible for Federal Direct Loans - Unsubsidized Stafford or Graduate PLUS,- Federal Perkins Loans and/or Federal Work Study. For more information on these types of aid, please see the relevant subsections of this FAQ.

What types of aid are available to masters students?

Masters students who file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) will be considered for federal aid. Graduate students may be eligible for Federal Direct Loans - Unsubsidized Stafford or Graduate PLUS - Federal Perkins Loans and/or Federal Work Study. For more information on these types of aid, please see the relevant subsections of this FAQ.

What types of aid are available to masters students?

Masters students who file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) will be considered for federal aid. Graduate students may be eligible for Federal Direct Loans - Unsubsidized Stafford or Graduate PLUS - Federal Perkins Loans and/or Federal Work Study. For more information on these types of aid, please see the relevant subsections of this FAQ.

What types of aid are available to international students?

International doctoral students are eligible for institutional aid, including fellowships. The academic programs will appoint students to a fellowship upon admission. International students are subject, however, to the Glacier process each semester in order to determine the taxes (if any) that the student’s home country requires to be withheld from the stipend. This process will likely delay stipend payment. Advances on stipend payment will be available for international students. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for details.
 
International students are not eligible for federal aid.

What types of aid are available to international students?

International doctoral students are eligible for institutional aid, including fellowships. The academic programs will appoint students to a fellowship upon admission. International students are subject, however, to the Glacier process each semester in order to determine the taxes (if any) that the student’s home country requires to be withheld from the stipend. This process will likely delay stipend payment. Advances on stipend payment will be available for international students. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for details.
 
International students are not eligible for federal aid.

Can I receive financial aid if I am auditing classes?

No, financial aid is not available for audited classes. 

Do my audited classes count towards full-time enrollment?

No, only classes taken for credit count towards full-time enrollment.

What is a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan?

A Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan is a non-need based federal student loan available to eligible graduate or professional students to help pay for the cost of the student's education. Interest accrues from the day the loan is disbursed until the day it is repaid in full. The Federal Government is the lender and does not subsidize the interest.
 
The 2016-2017 interest rate for federal Direct Unsubsidized Loans is 5.31% and is set annually by the Federal Government.
 
Federal Direct Loans also have an origination fee which is deducted at disbursement. This means the money a student receives will be less than the amount the student actually borrows.  The student is responsible for repaying the entire amount borrowed, not just the amount received. Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans disbursed between 10/1/15 and 10/1/16 will have an origination fee of 1.068%. Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans disbursed between 10/1/16 and 10/1/17 will have an origination fee of 1.069%.
 
The maximum loan amount is $20,500, but cannot exceed the student’s cost of attendance (determined by the school) minus any other financial aid received.
 
Upon disbursement, Federal Direct Loans are assigned to a third party servicer who will be responsible for billing. Federal Direct Loans have a six-month grace period. Borrowers begin repayment in the seventh month upon graduating, dropping below half-time, or withdrawing from school.
 
 

What is a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan?

A Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan is a non-need based federal student loan available to eligible graduate or professional students to help pay for the cost of the student's education. Interest accrues from the day the loan is disbursed until the day it is repaid in full. The Federal Government is the lender and does not subsidize the interest.
 
The 2016-2017 interest rate for federal Direct Unsubsidized Loans is 5.31% and is set annually by the Federal Government.
 
Federal Direct Loans also have an origination fee which is deducted at disbursement. This means the money a student receives will be less than the amount the student actually borrows.  The student is responsible for repaying the entire amount borrowed, not just the amount received. Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans disbursed between 10/1/15 and 10/1/16 will have an origination fee of 1.068%. Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans disbursed between 10/1/16 and 10/1/17 will have an origination fee of 1.069%.
 
The maximum loan amount is $20,500, but cannot exceed the student’s cost of attendance (determined by the school) minus any other financial aid received.
 
Upon disbursement, Federal Direct Loans are assigned to a third party servicer who will be responsible for billing. Federal Direct Loans have a six-month grace period. Borrowers begin repayment in the seventh month upon graduating, dropping below half-time, or withdrawing from school.

What is a Federal Direct Graduate Plus Loan?

A Federal Direct PLUS Loan is a credit-based loan available to eligible graduate or professional students to help pay for the cost of the student's education. The borrower must not have an adverse credit history. Interest accrues from the day the loan is disbursed until the day it is repaid in full. Graduate or professional students should exhaust Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan before taking out Federal Direct PLUS Loans. The Federal Government is the lender and does not subsidize the interest.
 
The 2016-2017 interest rate for Federal Direct Graduate Plus Loan is 6.31% and is set annually by the Federal Government.
 
Federal Direct Loans also have an origination fee which is deducted at disbursement. This means the money a student receives will be less than the amount the student actually borrows. The student is responsible for repaying the entire amount borrowed, not just the amount received. Direct Plus Loans disbursed between 10/1/15 and 10/1/16 will have an origination fee of 4.272%. Direct Plus Loans disbursed between 10/1/16 and 10/1/17 will have an origination fee of 4.276%.
 
The maximum loan amount is the student’s cost of attendance (determined by the school) minus any other financial aid received.
 
Upon disbursement, Federal Direct Loans are assigned to a third party servicer who will be responsible for billing. Federal Direct Loans have a six- month post-enrollment deferment. Borrowers begin repayment in the seventh month upon graduating, dropping below half-time or withdrawing from school.

What is a Federal Direct Graduate Plus Loan?

A Federal Direct PLUS Loan is a credit-based loan available to eligible graduate or professional students to help pay for the cost of the student's education. The borrower must not have an adverse credit history. Interest accrues from the day the loan is disbursed until the day it is repaid in full. Graduate or professional students should exhaust Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan before taking out Federal Direct PLUS Loans. The Federal Government is the lender and does not subsidize the interest.
 
The 2016-2017 interest rate for Federal Direct Graduate Plus Loan is 6.31% and is set annually by the Federal Government.
 
Federal Direct Loans also have an origination fee which is deducted at disbursement. This means the money a student receives will be less than the amount the student actually borrows. The student is responsible for repaying the entire amount borrowed, not just the amount received. Direct Plus Loans disbursed between 10/1/15 and 10/1/16 will have an origination fee of 4.272%. Direct Plus Loans disbursed between 10/1/16 and 10/1/17 will have an origination fee of 4.276%.
 
The maximum loan amount is the student’s cost of attendance (determined by the school) minus any other financial aid received.
 
Upon disbursement, Federal Direct Loans are assigned to a third party servicer who will be responsible for billing. Federal Direct Loans have a six- month post-enrollment deferment. Borrowers begin repayment in the seventh month upon graduating, dropping below half-time or withdrawing from school.

What is a Federal Direct Loan servicer and how do I find out who my servicer is?

A loan servicer is the company that collects payments, responds to customer service inquiries, and performs other administrative tasks associated with student loans on behalf of a lender. If a borrower has questions about repayment or his or her options, the servicer is often the best resource. Borrowers must make sure that loan servicers always have accurate contact information to avoid missing payments because of a lost bill.

Servicer contact information is located on National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS).
 

When will my Federal Direct Loan disburse?

Federal Direct Loans will disburse weekly starting at the beginning of each semester.
 
The student’s actual disbursement date is contingent upon when the Master Promissory Note (MPN) is signed and when the Federal Government links the signed MPN to the current year loan. Once this occurs, the loan will disburse on the next available disbursement date. There is usually a 2-3 week turnaround time between signing the MPN and receiving the funds.
 
The MPN is valid for 10 years, meaning a borrower does not need to resign the MPN annually.
 

How will I receive my Federal Direct Loan Refund?

If a student has a balance with the Bursar, the balance will be deducted from the loan.  The remaining loan proceeds will be direct deposited into the student’s bank account or mailed to the student.
 
Loan checks can be received in one of two ways:

  1. Direct Deposit (highly recommended) – Paperwork must be completed in the Bursar’s Office.
  2. A check will be mailed to the address listed on the student’s FAFSA. The mailing address can be updated on question #5 of the Direct Loan Request Form.

What is a Federal Perkins Loan?

A Federal Perkins Loan is a need-based, low-interest federal student loan. Perkins Loans carry a fixed interest rate of 5%.  The school is the lender; payment will be made to the school’s loan servicer, ECSI. The Perkins Loan program has a nine-month grace period. Borrowers begin repayment in the tenth month upon graduating, dropping below half-time or withdrawing from school.
 

What is a Federal Perkins Loan?

A Federal Perkins Loan is a need-based, low-interest federal student loan. Perkins Loans carry a fixed interest rate of 5%.  The school is the lender; payment will be made to the school’s loan servicer, ECSI. The Perkins Loan program has a nine-month grace period. Borrowers begin repayment in the tenth month upon graduating, dropping below half-time or withdrawing from school.

When will my Federal Perkins Loan be disbursed?

Before the Federal Perkins Loan can be disbursed, the student must complete both entrance counseling and the Master Promissory Note (MPN) every academic year. The entrance counseling and MPN are made available during the summer months.  Once those are completed, the loan would pay in the first available pay cycle. The fall disbursement date will be in September. The spring disbursement will be in February. Please note:  The Federal Perkins Loan program is set to expire on October 1, 2015. Students who complete their MPN and entrance counseling by September 20th will be able to receive their fall 2015 and spring 2016 Perkins Loan.  Any Federal Perkins recipient who has not completed their MPN and/or entrance counseling by September 20th, will have their Federal Perkins Loan canceled.
 

What is a Federal Perkins Loan servicer and how do I find out who my servicer is?

A loan servicer is the company that collects payments, responds to customer service inquiries, and performs other administrative tasks associated with student loans on behalf of a lender. If a borrower has questions about repayment or his or her options, the servicer is often the best resource. Borrowers must make sure that loan servicers always have accurate contact information to avoid missing payments because of a lost bill.

CUNY’s current servicer for the Federal Perkins loan is ECSI (www.ecsi.net).

How do I apply for work-study?

To be considered for federal work study (FWS), the FAFSA must be filed by the April 30th priority deadline and question 31 should be answered with a “yes,” indicating an interest in FWS.

FWS money is awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. The GC receives a fixed amount of money each academic year to make FWS awards.  Students who do not initially receive a FWS offer may complete the Federal Work Study Wish List Form in order to be considered if funds become available at a later date. Students who have been awarded work study will see it reflected as part of the financial aid award in Banner.


How do I apply for work-study?

To be considered for federal work study (FWS), the FAFSA must be filed by the April 30th priority deadline and question 31 should be answered with a “yes,” indicating an interest in FWS.

FWS money is awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. The GC receives a fixed amount of money each academic year to make FWS awards.  Students who do not initially receive a FWS offer may complete the Federal Work Study Wish List Form in order to be considered if funds become available at a later date. Students who have been awarded work study will see it reflected as part of the financial aid award in Banner.

Where would I work?

Student assignments are within the student’s academic program. 

Where would I work?

Student assignments are within the student’s academic program. 

Can I choose where I would like to work?

No. The Graduate School of Journalism students are assigned exclusively to their campus. The Graduate Center may offer a few students an alternative work assignment if their academic program does not have an available position. In this event, students should have prepared an updated resume or CV for distribution.

 

Can I earn as much money as I want?

No. The FWS award represents the maximum amount the student may earn for the academic year. How much of the total award is actually received depends upon the total number of hours worked. Once the maximum FWS award is earned, the student will have to stop working.

Students who would like to request additional FWS funds, may submit the FWS Wish List form. This form can be submitted after they have earned 3/4 of their FWS award (make sure to check the box below the signature line to make this request). Submit the completed form the Financial Aid Office for processing.

Am I paid an hourly wage or a salary?

Students are paid an hourly wage for FWS positions.
The Graduate School of Journalism pay rate is $12.00 per hour.
The Graduate Center the pay rate is $16.00 per hour. 

 

How will I be paid?

The student’s FWS supervisor is solely responsible to submit the bi-weekly FWS time sheet to the Office of Financial Aid.  Once submitted, the time sheet will be processed and payment will be generated. The student can determine if he or she prefer a paper paycheck, direct deposit, or a debit card to be loaded with the payment. Payments are made bi-weekly, as outlined on the FWS Payroll Calendar. If your FWS time sheet is submitted late, then your payment will be made on the next pay date listed on the FWS Payroll Calendar.
 

Am I eligible to receive unemployment benefits when I have earned my FWS award?

No. Students enrolled in a nonprofit or public educational institutions which combine academic instruction with work experience (such as the FWS program) are excluded from the Unemployment Insurance Program. 
 

If I am unable to earn my entire award, will I be able to receive the rest of the money?

No. Students can only be paid for the hours worked. If the student cannot earn the entire FWS award before the end of the academic year, then the unearned portion of the award is returned to the program.

How many credits do I have to take for FWS eligibility?

Students must register for and maintain an enrollment status of half-time (6 credits/WIUs) or greater to retain federal student aid eligibility for the FWS Program. Courses taken as a non-matriculated student and/or audited courses do not count toward a student’s eligibility to receive federal student aid.

If, for any reason, a student’s course load falls below half-time (6 credits/WIUs), the student can no longer earn monies from the FWS program and must stop working.
 

Do I have to stop working if I withdraw from school, take a leave of absence, or if I graduate?

Yes. If a student withdraws from school for any reason, he or she loses his or her eligibility for FWS and must stop working. Students who take a leave of absence, graduate, or drop below the 6 credits/WIUs are no longer eligible to earn monies from the FWS Program.

I am currently receiving unemployment. Do I have to report FWS earnings to the unemployment office?

Yes. Students who are receiving unemployment insurance benefits while employed in the FWS program must notify their local unemployment office that they are working in the FWS program. The New York State Department of Labor considers it willful misrepresentation to collect unemployment benefits without revealing that the student is also receiving FWS.

Are FWS earnings taxable?

Yes. FWS earnings are considered taxable income by both federal and state governments. FWS earnings are not, however, included in the calculation of a student’s eligibility for financial aid, provided that the student completes FAFSA question 44C.

Why do I have to fill out an I-9 form and the other forms posted to my banner student web account?

According to federal law, the identity and work eligibility of all FWS students must be verified before beginning a FWS assignment. Students will have to complete an I-9 form and present certain documents to an appropriate FWS representative. Students may not participate in the FWS program until they have filed an I-9 form with the Financial Aid Office. Other required documents include: the FERPA Confidentiality Agreement, the NYS Wage Rate Pay Day form, and withholding forms for the IRS and NYS. The blank forms are posted to the GC website

What are the benefits of the FWS program?

For students who have never had a job, the FWS program can give them exposure to the world of work. FWS employers are often willing to give on-the-job training. A majority of our FWS placements are directly related to the student’s program of study or career choice, thereby allowing valuable job experience. When seeking regular employment after graduation, students may use their FWS position as an employment reference. 

When are applicants notified about fellowships?

Applicants are formally notified about fellowships at the time they receive an offer of admission. This varies by doctoral program but is unlikely to be before early February.
 

Can an entering student who receives an offer of admission and funding defer these offers to the next year?

No. Neither funding offers nor admission offers can be deferred. Applicants can ask that their application be put into a pending status for reconsideration the following year.

Can I hold more than one five-year fellowship?

No. Students with a Graduate Center Fellowship, CUNY Science Scholarship, Science Fellowship, or Presidential MAGNET Fellowship may not concurrently hold another Graduate Center five-year award. Students with these fellowships also may not concurrently hold another CUNY graduate assistantship or Dissertation Fellowship.

Students holding only Graduate Center five-year Tuition Fellowships may hold other Graduate Center awards and graduate assistantships, but not another five-year fellowship.

Do five-year fellowships cover the cost of student fees?

Each semester, all doctoral students are charged student fees. The descriptions of the five-year fellowships clearly specify whether the award covers the cost of student fees. Please review the description of your fellowship to verify this information.

What do I have to do to receive my funding?

Students will be notified by the Financial Aid Office that they must accept the stipend portion of their award and their Tuition Waiver online via the GC student web. Notices to incoming students are sent to the addresses and emails that they used on their application for admissions. Incoming students must also attend a Human Resources orientation, where they will sign an appointment letter and will be placed on the Graduate Center payroll for their graduate assistantship. Human Resource orientations are held in August. (Information about these sessions is sent in the summer.)

What does the service entail for the Graduate Center Fellowship?

In the first year of the GCF, the required service is a graduate assistantship B (GAB). The GAB requires 7.5 hours per week of service for your academic program. Usually this is in the form of research assistance for a faculty member.

In years two, three, and four of the GCF, fellows are required to teach one course per semester at one of the CUNY undergraduate campuses. Campus placements are made by your doctoral program. In year five of the GC Fellowship, the required service is a nonteaching graduate assistantship on one of the CUNY campuses. This will require fifteen hours per week of service as part of the CUNY-Wide Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) Program.

What does the service entail for the CUNY Science Scholarship?

In the first year, there is a modest service obligation related to professional development and research laboratory rotations. In the second through fifth years of the award, there are usually some teaching assignments arranged by the campus where the fellows do their research.

Can I undertake extra teaching or research at CUNY, beyond that required by my graduate assistantship, for additional compensation?

Students holding a graduate assistantship are usually able to teach one course per semester as an adjunct. Contractual workload rules apply.

How will my fellowship be paid?

Fellowships are often made up of different components including tuition, a stipend and/or an assistantship.
 
All components of a fellowship can only be paid once a student has accepted his or her award in Banner and is registered full-time. For doctoral students, 7 credits is considered full-time. Students must also have their Social Security Number (SSN) or Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) on file with the Office of Financial Aid. International students should refer to the international student section of the FAQ for additional information.
 
Tuition coverage: Once a student registers full-time, a bill is created by the Bursar and tuition coverage will automatically be applied.

Assistantships: (Grad A, B, or D) are paid biweekly over one calendar year. In order to have biweekly payments processed, students must attend a Human Resources orientation before the semester begins. Information on assistantship payment will be provided during that orientation.
 
Stipends (GCF, CSS, Science, Math, MAGNET, Neuroscience): will be mailed to the student’s address in Banner as a lump sum at the beginning of each semester, provided that the student has enrolled full-time, accepted the stipend, and has a SSN or TIN. In order to receive payment as early as possible, students should be sure to register and accept their aid prior to the financial aid registration deadline. To find out the deadline for the upcoming semester, please visit the announcement section of our website at http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Prospective-Current-Students/Current-Students/Financial-AssistancePlease note:  If a student’s registration or level changes, his or her financial aid award may also change.

How will my fellowship be paid?

Fellowships are often made up of different components including tuition, a stipend and/or an assistantship.
 
All components of a fellowship can only be paid once a student has accepted his or her award in Banner and is registered full-time. For doctoral students, 7 credits is considered full-time. Students must also have their Social Security Number (SSN) or Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) on file with the Office of Financial Aid. International students should refer to the international student section of the FAQ for additional information.
 
Tuition coverage: Once a student registers full-time, a bill is created by the Bursar and tuition coverage will automatically be applied within two business days.

Assistantships: (Grad A, B, or D) are paid biweekly over one calendar year. In order to have biweekly payments processed, first-time graduate assistants must attend a Human Resources orientation before the semester begins. Information on assistantship payment will be provided during that orientation.
 
Stipends (GCF, CSS, Science, Math, MAGNET, Neuroscience): will be mailed to the student’s address in Banner as a lump sum at the beginning of each semester, provided that the student has enrolled full-time, accepted the stipend, and has a SSN or TIN. In order to receive payment as early as possible, students should be sure to register and accept their aid prior to the financial aid registration deadline. To find out the deadline for the upcoming semester, please visit the announcement section of our website at http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Prospective-Current-Students/Current-Students/Financial-AssistancePlease note:  If a student’s registration or level changes, his or her financial aid award may also change.

What happens to my fellowship if I transfer programs within The Graduate Center?

Your fellowship will not transfer with you.  Five-year recruitment awards cannot be made to people who have already received one in another program. In their lifetime no one can receive more than five years of support from such an award or from an award such as a tuition remission. 
 

Can I lose my funding?

To be eligible for funding, students must be in good academic standing and registered full-time in accordance with the Graduate Center degree requirements. Students must also be satisfactorily performing the service requirement of their funding.

Appointments are made on a yearly basis, subject to satisfactory progress. Students must accept the award each year and will receive a yearly letter for the graduate assistantship appointment. This letter must be signed and returned to the Human Resources Office. Students must also accept the stipend and tuition portions of the award online via the student web. Failure to do this can result in the loss of funding or in the delay of payments.

Failure to receive approval for a leave of absence can result in the loss of an award.

Are there other restrictions?

  • Financial support is contingent upon the fellow being registered full-time and in good academic standing.
  • Notifications of financial awards are emailed to the student’s Graduate Center email address. The student must accept each award, including each individual component of a fellowship. Failure to do so will result in the award being rescinded.
  • Students with at Tuition Fellowship must have a taxpayer identification number (TIN). All other students with Graduate Center funding must have a U.S. Social Security number (SSN). 

        NOTE: The amount of fellowship aid you receive has an effect on the
        amount of federal aid for which you are eligible 

After the five years of the fellowship, are there any other forms of support available?

Students who hold five-year fellowships may not hold another fellowship concurrently. However, students past year five who are no longer on their five-year award may apply for other awards, such as the Graduate Center Dissertation Fellowships, GC Digital Fellowships, Program Social Media Fellowships, and fellowships funded by various centers and institutes.

What is Satisfactory Academic Progress?

In order to receive federal student aid, a student must be making Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). SAP is measured in three ways: qualitative, quantitative, and time to degree. At the GC, SAP is measured as follows:
   
    Qualitative: 
  • Student must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

    Quantitative:
  • Student must have earned a passing grade in each course attempted.
  • Student cannot have more than two open grades of “INC,” “INP,” NGR,” “ABS,” or “ABP.”
  • Doctoral students must have passed their first examination by the time 45 credits are completed.
  • Doctoral students must pass their second examination within 10 semesters.
  • Doctoral students cannot receive two “NRP” grades in succession.

    Time to Degree:
  • Doctoral students must complete all degree requirements no later than eight years of matriculation. A student who matriculates after completing 30 credits of acceptable work must complete all degree requirements within seven years.
  • Master’s Degree students must complete all requirements no later than four years after matriculation.
  • Students who receive time limit extensions to their masters or doctoral programs must have the documentation sent to the Financial Aid Office and the approval of the VP of Student Affairs must be annotated to the document.

As a student, what are my financial aid responsibilities? What should I know?

  • Be mindful of deadlines, such as the FAFSA deadline, the Financial Aid Registration deadline, etc.
  • Check Banner regularly
    • Accept his or her award in Banner.
    • A student should make sure that he or she does not owe financial aid any outstanding documents.
    • A student should monitor his or her bill to make sure his or her aid is being applied appropriately.
  • A student should check his or her GC email regularly.  All financial aid correspondence will be sent to that address.
  • Be aware that if a student’s enrollment or level changes, that student’s financial aid may also change.
 
In order to stay aware of major deadlines, follow the Office of Financial Aid on Twitter @GCFinancialAid.           

I am teaching at a CUNY college. Does this mean I qualify for tuition coverage?

A student qualifies for tuition remission as long as he or she meets the following criteria:
  • Is registered full-time in a PhD or equivalent program;
  • Is within his or her first 10 semesters of enrollment;
  • Does not have a five year fellowship.
  • Holds a graduate assistantship (A,B,C, or D) OR is teaching a minimum of 3 credits with the official title of “Adjunct Lecturer Doctoral Student” or “Adjunct Lecturer."

I meet all of the criteria. How do I apply for tuition remission?

The student should bring their appointment letter to their Executive Officer or Assistant Program Officer. Their program will then notify the financial aid office of the students eligibility. 

I have been in school for more than ten semesters. Can I receive tuition remission?

Unfortunately, students can only receive tuition remission from the Graduate Center in their first ten semesters.   If you have been teaching as an adjunct at one campus for ten or more consecutive semesters, you should contact that campus’s Human Resources department.  They may be able to offer a tuition benefit.

What happens if I withdraw from all of my classes?

The total dollar amount of aid a student is eligible to receive is affected when he or she drops all of their classes. Students who drop all of their classes should come to the Office of Financial Aid to speak with a financial aid counselor about the implications of their decision.

If I drop one or more courses am I still eligible to receive my financial aid?

Students in receipt of institutional aid (fellowships and assistantships) must be registered full time (at least seven credits/WIUs) to maintain eligibility.
 
Students receiving federal student aid (Federal Perkins, Federal Work Study, and Federal Direct Loans) are required to be registered for six or more credits/WIUs to meet the minimum eligibility requirements for those programs.
 
Audit classes do not count towards a student’s eligibility to receive institutional and federal student aid.
 
Dropping one or more classes may result in the cancellation of future loan disbursements and/or may result in the student having to return money to the school. Dropping classes may also impact a student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress. Please refer to the Satisfactory Progress section above for more information. 

Where can I find information about all of my student loans?

The  National Student Loan Database System (NSLDS) can be found at www.nslds.ed.gov. It contains information about all (undergraduate and graduate) the Federal student loans a student has borrowed; whether paid or unpaid. The NSLDS record includes lender(s), servicers, outstanding principal balances and current loan status. In order to access NSLDS you must use your FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) ID. Alternative loans are not reported to or recorded on NSLDS. Borrowers will need to contact their alternative loan lender directly for information about those loans.

Do I have to repay my loans as soon as I leave school?

Most loans will allow borrowers a period of time after graduation before they have to start making payments on their loans.  This period of time is known as a grace period. Interest will not accrue on most subsidized loans during the grace period, but will accrue on all unsubsidized loans.  

Do my Federal Direct Loans have a grace period?

The initial grace period for the Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan begins after a student is no longer enrolled in an eligible status; drops below half-time enrollment (less than 6 credits), graduates, takes a leave of absence or withdraws from school. The grace period for Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loans is six (6) months. Once the grace period is exhausted, borrowers will not receive another one. 

In most cases, the Direct Loan Servicer will automatically grant an in-school deferment on a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan based on information reported by your school to the U.S. Department of Education showing that you are enrolled at least half time.

There is no grace period for Federal Direct Plus Loans. However, in most cases, the Direct Loan Servicing Center will automatically grant an in-school deferment on your Federal Direct PLUS Loan based on information reported by your school to the U.S. Department of Education showing that you are enrolled at least half time. The Direct Loan Servicing Center will notify you of the deferment and of your option to cancel the deferment and begin making payments on your loan. The loan will remain in deferment for an additional six months after you cease to be enrolled at least half-time.  Interest will accumulate during the deferment. If the interest is not paid during deferment, it may be capitalized (added to the principal balance).  
 

Does my Federal Perkins Loan have a grace period?

The initial grace period begins after a student is no longer enrolled at an eligible status, meaning when the student drops below half-time enrollment (6 credits or 6 equated credits), graduates, takes a leave of absence or withdraws from school.  The initial grace period lasts nine (9) months. No interest accrues nor are payments due during a grace period. Students are required to begin repaying the Perkins loan when the grace period ends. 
 
Once the student enters repayment, CUNY’s loan servicer, ECSI, will send the student a monthly billing statement. 

When I enter repayment, how much will I pay?

For Federal Direct Loans, approximately one month before a borrower is scheduled to enter repayment, the borrower’s servicer will send information on the different repayment plans available and an estimate as to what each repayment plan will cost. For information on the different repayment plans available to Direct Loan borrowers, please visit: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/understand/plans. This site also has a calculator that will allow a borrower to estimate their payments before entering repayment.
 
ECSI will contact the student regarding payments for the Perkins Loan.

What is a deferment?

A deferment is a period of time where a borrower can suspend payments as long as he or she meets certain eligibility criteria.  Subsidized loans will not accrue interest during any period of deferment. Interest will accumulate on unsubsidized loans.  While the borrower is not required to pay the interest during a deferment, any unpaid interest will be capitalized (added to the principal) once the deferment ends.
 

How can I defer my Federal Direct Loans?

Deferment is not automatic. A borrower must apply for deferment by using a deferment form obtained from his or her servicer’s website. Supporting documentation may be required.

How can I defer my Federal Perkins Loan?

Deferment is not automatic. A borrower must apply for a deferment by using a deferment form obtained from the University’s billing servicer, ECSI at www.ecsi.net. The borrower will need his or her ESCI PIN to access the site. Supporting documentation is usually required. Once the approved deferment period ends, borrowers are entitled to an additional six-month post deferment grace period.

What is a forbearance?

A forbearance is a temporary adjustment of payments during times of hardship. During a forbearance, interest will accumulate on all loans. If the interest is not paid during forbearance, it may be capitalized (added to the principal balance).  

How can I put my Federal Perkin Loan into forbearance?

Borrowers must apply for a forbearance by using a forbearance form obtained from the University’s loan servicer, ECSI at www.esci.net. The borrower will need his or her ESCI PIN to access the site. Forbearance is usually granted for 6 months at a time. The total period of forbearance is limited to three years. Forbearance and extensions on forbearance are not automatic. For an additional forbearance you must submit a new request.

When can my federal loans be forgiven, canceled, or discharged?

You must repay your loans even if you don’t complete your education, can’t find a job related to your program of study, or are unhappy with the education you paid for with your loans. There are rare circumstances, however, when a student’s loans may be forgiven, canceled or discharged. For more information, please visit: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation.

What are Federal Perkins Loan cancellations?

As one of the benefits of the Federal Perkins Loan, a borrower may be eligible to have up to 100 percent of his or her loan canceled by engaging in certain types of public service and community based work. A Perkins loan may also be canceled in the event of total and permanent disability or death. For more information about what qualifies for loan cancellation, visit: https://studentaid.ed.gov/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/charts#perkins-loan-cancellation.

Cancellations are not automatic. If a borrower is eligible for a cancellation, it is the borrower’s responsibility to complete the appropriate forms and submit them to the loan servicer on a timely basis. Contact the University’s loan servicer – ECSI – or download forms from their web site at www.ecsi.net. Please note that additional documentation is usually required.
 

What happens if I do not repay my federal loans?

After 270 days of non-payment, a borrower’s loan will enter default status.  The consequences of default can be severe:
 
  • The loan will be assigned to a collection agency.
  • The loan will be reported as delinquent to the credit bureaus, damaging the borrower’s credit. It will take years to reestablish credit after a default.
  • May result in wage garnishment and/or tax offsets.
  • Please see https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/default#when for additional details.

French

Is a Master's Degree required for admission?

No.

Must entering students hold a degree in French Literature or French Studies as a requirement for entry?

Not necessarily. A number of our students hold degrees in fields such as Philosophy, Theatre, History, Music, and Religion. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of many of our courses and our four curricular options, many students find that their prior training helps them in their current fields of study and research projects. However, most of our students have pursued “traditional” French Literature or French Studies degrees.

Must the writing sample be in French?

We ask that the writing sample, usually an academic essay in which the student demonstrates his/her critical and analytical skills, be at least 10 pages written in French. One sample is required for applicants with BAs and two samples or MA thesis are required for students with MA degrees.

Do I need to take the GRE to be considered for admission? What score will you accept? I took the GRE ten years ago. Will you accept my score?

Yes, the GRE is an admissions requirement and the score is considered along with other academic factors. Our admissions candidates have competitive scores. Scores more than five years old are generally not accepted.

What kinds of letters of recommendation do I need?

Two academic letters of recommendation should be written by a professor who not only knows the candidate well, but can attest to his/ her academic achievements and intellectual abilities. If it has been some time since the applicant was enrolled in college, we may accept letters written by professional acquaintances who can attest to the applicant's ability to complete graduate study, in addition to two academic letters of reference.

I am a foreign student, but I completed my B.A./M.A. at an American university. Do I need to submit TOEFL scores? I am a foreign student but have taught English for many years in France. Is there any other way to attest to my English capabilities besides the TOEFL?

International students must complete the TOEFL examination. International students who have completed degrees in English-speaking countries are generally exempt.
Foreign students who have not obtained degrees in English-speaking countries are required to take the TOEFL exam. More information about the TOEFL can be found at the test administration website, www.ets.org.

I have my Master's Degree. What is the maximum number of credits that will transfer?

Transfer credits will be individually evaluated once the student has entered the program, but up to 30 credits may be awarded to the student. Students with 27 or more credits must take at least 18 credits in the Program. Please see page 4 of the handbook for further information.

My intellectual interests are very diverse and interdisciplinary. How can I complete my PhD in French in your program?

Students are encouraged to pursue their intellectual interests as they enrich their own understanding of French literature. Many of our students are interested in cinema, theatre, international human rights, and performance studies. In addition, it is possible to enroll in one of the Graduate Center's certificate programs.

Are all the courses conducted in French, and must all written work be submitted in French?

Each semester, generally one class is offered in English, and any final paper must be written in the language of the class. In cross-listed fields, it is up to the instructor. Because of the nature of the profession, and the demands of publishers and conferences, students will be required to speak and write fluently in both French and English. In addition, some of our courses are cross-listed with other departments and programs, such as Comparative Literature and Women's Studies; thus, the course will be conducted in English.

How many comprehensive exams are required? How many language proficiency exams are required?

Please see page two of the French Program handbook.

Are there opportunities for Study Abroad?

Undergraduate and graduate students may participate in the CUNY/Paris exchange program. Information about the CUNY/Paris exchange program can be found here:
http://qcpages.qc.cuny.edu/studyabroad/StudyAbroadProgramsCUNYParis.html

What is student life like?

Because of the structure of the first-year curriculum, French Program students find a sense of intellectual and social cohesiveness and quickly become mentors for each other in a truly international atmosphere. In addition, the Program arranges several colloquia, conferences, and lectures each year, including an annual Student Conference run by our own graduate students. 

The CUNY Doctoral Students' Council is the main political and social presence of the student body on the Graduate Center campus, and French department students participate in their events and activities. Their website is www.cunydsc.org.

Likewise, French departments students have an active presence in the many chartered organizations at the GC, such as the Africa Research Group, L'Atelier, the French 17th-Century Interdisciplinary Group, and the Middle East Research Group.

What type of housing is available for graduate students? How will I find an apartment in New York City?

Please visit the GC housing Website for information about student housing. In addition, websites like Craigslist and the Village Voice are popular places to find housing information.

It is almost financially impossible to live alone, especially in Manhattan. Most of our students live with roommates in Brooklyn, Queens, or Upper Manhattan. Since our campus is centrally located off of express subway lines, few students have to travel more than 30 minutes to get to class.

What type of health insurance is available to students?

All matriculated graduate students may benefit from Student Health Services, which maintains the Wellness Center. Here, students can receive professional psychological counseling, as well as schedule appointments with the Wellness Center's licensed nurse practitioner for routine medical exams and their ongoing medical needs. The office visits are free of charge, and any lab services needed are provided at an extremely discounted fee.

Matriculated doctoral students at the Graduate Center who are employed as either Graduate Assistants or in one of the eligible Adjunct titles and meet specific income levels in those titles are eligible for health insurance coverage for themselves and their dependents. More information is available here.

What kinds of fellowships are available? Am I required to teach in the first year?

A list of Graduate Center fellowships is available through the Financial Aid office.
The Graduate Teaching Fellowship (GTF) and Graduate Assistant A/B (GAA, GAB) packages require teaching at a CUNY college. There are additional fellowships and aid available that do not require teaching.

What types of teaching appointments are available?

Many, but not all of our students gain employment as adjunct language instructors on one of the CUNY campuses. Students are encouraged to express to the Executive Officer their wish to teach, but requests cannot always be accommodated. Advanced students seek grants through the CUNY Writing Fellows program, Mellon Scholarship, etc. Information about these grants can be found on the GC website.

GC Membership

What are the benefits and costs of membership?

Different levels of membership and accompanying benefits and costs can be found here, but the most important benefit is being a part of the Graduate Center’s vibrant intellectual and cultural community.

Who is eligible for membership?

Anyone who wishes to be a part of the Graduate Center community and help support its academic and public programs.

For how long are memberships valid?

Memberships are valid for the academic year in which they are purchased.

Can I purchase a gift membership?

Not yet, but we will be offering that option in the near future.

Is the cost the same to purchase a membership mid year or at the beginning?

Yes, but keep in mind that ongoing discounts and member events make it worthwhile to join even as the year progresses.

Do I have to show my membership card?

No, the card is for your own reference.

Does my membership card provide special building access?

No.

Can I give my ticket discount code to a non-member?

No, tickets discount codes are only valid for members purchasing tickets.

Is there a limit to the number of tickets I can purchase with my discount code?

No, you may use your code to purchase as many discount tickets as you wish.

Are other membership benefits transferable?

No, all benefits are only for individual members.

Are you on Facebook?

Yes, please join us for late-breaking news, event reminders, and photos from our Public Programs.

Health Services

What is Student Health Services (SHS)?

Student Health Services is a free health clinic for Graduate Center students. A licensed nurse practitioner provides primary health care. Students are seen by appointment or on a limited walk-in bases. SHS can also provide referrals to other low-cost clinics and specialists as needed. Many lab tests can be performed at SHS and students will be billed for these services. Through an arrangement with Mount Sinai Medical Center and subsidies by the Doctoral Students Council, tests are usually inexpensive.

What is a Nurse Practitioner?

A nurse practitioner (NP) is a registered nurse (RN) who has completed advanced education (a minimum of a master's degree) and training in the diagnosis and management of common medical conditions, including chronic illnesses. Nurse practitioners provide a broad range of health care services. They provide some of the same care provided by physicians and maintain close working relationships with physicians. An NP can serve as a patient's regular health care provider.

Nurse practitioners see patients of all ages. The core philosophy of the field is individualized care. Nurse practitioners focus on patients' conditions as well as the effects of illness on the lives of the patients and their families. NPs make prevention, wellness, and patient education priorities. This can mean fewer prescriptions and less expensive treatments. Informing patients about their health care and encouraging them to participate in decisions are central to the care provided by NPs. In addition to health care services, NPs conduct research and are often active in patient advocacy activities. Because the profession is state regulated, care provided by NPs varies. A nurse practitioner's duties include the following:

• Collaborating with physicians and other health professionals as needed, including providing referrals
• Counseling and educating patients on health behaviors, self-care skills, and treatment options
• Diagnosing and treating acute illnesses, infections, and injuries
• Diagnosing, treating, and monitoring chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes, high blood pressure)
• Obtaining medical histories and conducting physical examinations
• Ordering, performing, and interpreting diagnostic studies (e.g., lab tests, x-rays, EKGs)
• Prescribing medications
• Prescribing physical therapy and other rehabilitation treatments
• Providing prenatal care and family planning services
• Providing well-child care, including screening and immunizations
• Providing health maintenance care for adults, including annual physicals

Nurse practitioners provide high-quality, cost-effective individualized care that is comparable to the health care provided by physicians, and NP services are often covered by insurance providers. NPs practice in all states. The institutions in which they work include the following:

• Community clinics and health centers
• Health departments
• Health maintenance organizations (HMOs)
• Home health care agencies
• Hospitals and hospital clinics
• Hospice centers
• Nurse practitioner offices
• Nursing homes
• Nursing schools
• Physician offices
• Private offices
• Public health departments
• School/college clinics
• Veterans Administration facilities
• Walk-in clinics

Most NPs specialize in a particular field of medical care, and there are as many types of NPs as there are medical specialties.

I feel sick. Should I come in?

Keeping in mind your personal factors (age, existing conditions, recent health issues) and your health history, here are some questions to ask yourself that can help you decide if you should call your provider:

• Do I sense that something is urgently wrong? Start here. Trust your instincts and see a doctor if you sense that you need immediate medical attention. Always check out chest pains, loss of consciousness, or new severe physical pain.

• What are my symptoms? Have I had them before? If so, how did they get resolved? Would the same approach work now or is there something different about the symptoms this time? Could they be related to a recent condition or procedure?

• How long have the symptoms been going on? Are they getting better or worse? Generally any symptoms that are not improving after one to two weeks are worth pursuing with a healthcare provider. Pay attention to symptoms that are getting worse (and consider the first question).

• What do I really think would be best for my health (ignoring any worries that I will be a bother if I go to the doctor, or that it will cost too much)?

(Source: http://www.takingcharge.csh.umn.edu/create-healthy-lifestyle/self-care-and-prevention/when-should-you-go-doctor)

Call the Wellness Center first to see if you can walk-in.

How much will this cost me?

Services at the Student Health Services at the Wellness Center provided by the Nurse Practioner are free to currently enrolled graduate students of the CUNY Graduate Center. This includes episodic and primary health care but does not include laboratory testing done off-site. The cost of laboratory testing may be covered by insurance if you have it.
If you are uninsured, laboratory costs for blood and urine tests are substantially reduced through an arrangement with Mount Sinai Medical Center and then reduced further through partial subsidies from the Graduate Center.

For students who are uninsured or underinsured, and require radiology testing, prescriptions, or specialty referral, the SHS attempts to direct students to the least expensive providers, since these services are not connected with the Graduate Center. All students who are uninsured or underinsured are encouraged to investigate possibilities for health insurance and can receive advice through Student Affairs.

Laboratory Testing Fees Information & Agreement

More information on health insurance coverage for Doctoral students
More resources for the uninsured

Do I need health insurance to be treated at the Wellness Center?

NO, you do not need health insurance to be treated at the Wellness Center. Visits are FREE and laboratory tests are low cost. Those students who are not insured are responsible for 30% of all lab fees (if applicable). It is always recommended to sign up for health insurance. Learn more about health insurance options for students at the Grad Center.

Laboratory Testing Fees Information & Agreement

It's an emergency and the Wellness Center is closed! What should I do?

If you are in the Graduate Center, call Security at x7777 immediately. They can get help to you the fastest.

If you need to go to an emergency room, here are several around New York City:

Manhattan:
NYU Downtown Hospital, 70 William Street, (212) 312-5063
NYU Langone Medical Center, 550 1st Avenue, (212) 263-5550
Mount Sinai Medical Center, 1190 Fifth Avenue (East Harlem), (212) 241-6500
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, 525 East 68th Street, (212) 746-0795
Columbia University Medical Center, 622 West 168th Street, (212) 305-6204
The Allen Pavilion Hospital, 5141 Broadway (@ 220th Street), (212) 932-4245
Coler-Goldwater Memorial Hospital, One Main Street, Roosevelt Island, (212) 318-8000

Brooklyn:
Coney Island Hospital, 2601 Ocean Parkway, (718) 616-3000
Long Island College Hospital, 339 Hicks St (between Atlantic Ave & Pacific St), (718) 522-1099

Bronx:
Montefiore Medical Center, 111 East 210th Street, (718) 741-2000
Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center, 234 East 149th Street, (718) 579-5000

Queens
Mount Sinai Queens, 2510 30th Avenue (Astoria), (718) 267-4285
Elmhurst Hospital Center, 79-01 Broadway, (718) 334-4000

Staten Island:
Staten Island University Hospital, NORTH SITE: 475 Seaview Avenue, (718) 226-9000
Staten Island University Hospital, SOUTH SITE: 375 Seguine Avenue, (718) 226-2000

For non-emergencies, see our RESOURCES page for a list of free or low cost health clinics

I need some over-the-counter medication, can I obtain this from the Wellness Center?

The administrative staff is not authorized to dispense of any over-the-counter medication or first aid supplies.  When the Nurse Practitioner is not on site/unavailable for a walk-in visit, please visit the Security Desk in the lobby for assistance.

I am a staff member/adjunct faculty/temporary student, am I eligible for services at the Wellness Center?

Our services are stricly for matriculated registered students of the Graduate Center and CUNY Graduate School of Journalism.

I'm an incoming Grad Center student. How do I go about submitting proof of immunizations?

Per New York State law, all incoming students MUST submit proof of immunizations in order to be able to register for classes. All immunization requirements and forms can be found on our Immunization page. Often the easiest way to obtain your immunization records is to request them from your undergraduate college. Even if you attended another CUNY college for undergrad, you must request a copy of your immunization records to be sent to the Graduate Center.

Alternatively, please visit our Immunizations page to locate outside health clinics that will provide vaccinations free of charge. If you have one, consult your Primary Care Physician for immunization records or to request a blood test showing immunity.

Lastly, Meningococcal Meningitis shots are NOT required. However failure to properly complete and submit the Meningococcal Meningitis Response Form will result in a registration hold.

How do I obtain a copy of my immunization records?

Please fill out the immunization record request form and allow 3 business days processing time. 

You may drop off, fax, or email the request form:
Wellness Center
Student Health Services
365 Fifth Avenue, Suite 6422
New York, NY 10016
212-817-7020 (phone)
212-817-1602 (fax)
wellness@gc.cuny.edu

Please note that we keep immunization records on file 7 years from the date of admission.

I’m a Graduate Center student at another campus. Should I go here or to Student Health Services on my home campus?

If you are registered as a Graduate Center student and pay your tuition here, you must come to Student Health Services at the Graduate Center, not the health center at another campus. You must go to the health center at the school for which you are registered and pay your tuition. E-permit students must go to their "home campus" for services (where they pay tuition, not where they are permitted to take a class). If you have further questions, please call us at 212-817-7020.

What about Psychological Counseling?

A wide range of Psychological Counseling is also available at the GC Wellness Center. Visit Student Counseling Services for more info.

Housing

Who is eligible to rent in the Graduate Center Apartments complex?

All matriculated graduate students at The Graduate Center, The Graduate School of Journalism, and other CUNY campuses are eligible. Students need to be in good academic and financial standing as well as progressing toward a degree.

How long is the license, and how is it different from a lease?

The license has a 12-month term. It functions like a lease, except that a renter must maintain eligibility in order for it to remain in effect.

How long can I live there?

Licenses will be renewed annually for students who remain in good academic and financial standing.

How do you decide whom to accept?

All eligible students will be accepted on a first-come-first-served basis. Those students who have been accepted must sign the license agreement and make the necessary deposit.

What deposits are required?

Two-months' rent is required at the signing of the license–-one as a refundable security deposit and the other as the first month’s rent.

What utilities are included in the rent?

Heat and water are included; electricity, telephone, and cable service will be billed separately.

Do I need a credit check or references to become eligible?

No. The only initial eligibility factor is your status as a student in good standing and progressing toward a degree.

Are the apartments furnished?

Yes. Each bedroom will have a bed, mattress, dresser, desk, and chair. The common area will have a kitchen table, chairs, and lounge furniture. The kitchen includes a stovetop, microwave, refrigerator, sink, and cabinets. There are no dishes, linens, pots, pans, or cutlery.

Can I choose my roommates?

Two-, three-, and four-bedroom units will be occupied by individual students. Groups of students who want to share units may do so upon request. Of course, all must be eligible and have been selected for residence.

Can my spouse/partner and/or children live in the residence?

Yes. Students with spouses, partners, and/or children must rent entire units. These will be studios or one- or two-bedroom units.

Will the building have a live-in superintendent?

Yes. A superintendent will have 24/7 responsibilities to respond to facility, maintenance and mechanical issues.

Will the building have a doorman?

The building has a virtual doorman, i.e., each apartment will be equipped with a video intercom connected to the building’s front door.

What if I don’t have anyone specific to live with?

Individual students may license an entire unit or may license a bedroom in a multi-bedroom unit. If you license a bedroom in a multi-bedroom unit, the other occupants of the unit will be assigned by the Graduate Center.

May I sublet my license?

No. Subletting is a violation of the license agreement.

Is smoking allowed in my unit?

No. The entire facility is smoke free, including terraces, the rooftop garden, and the first-floor lounge.

Can I have pets or animals in my unit?

No. Animals of any kind are not allowed in the facility except as assistance for the disabled.

Is there on-site parking?

No. All that is available is street parking.

What if my roommates don’t pay their rent?

Each student is living on a separate license. You are only responsible for your own payment each month.

What happens after you receive my application?

Your application will be placed on a waiting list. You will receive an email reply with additional instructions and will be contacted by the GC Housing Office as vacancies become available.

Does the residence have a security guard?

Yes. There is an assigned guard 24/7.

Does the building have security cameras?

Yes. There are security cameras located both within the building as well as in front of the building.

May I have packages accepted on my behalf?

Yes. As a resident you may make prior arrangements with the security desk to receive packages on your behalf.

How close is public transportation located?

There are subways and buses located two blocks from the residence building. In addition, the security desk has telephone numbers for taxi pick-up.

Human Resources

Are College Assistants eligible for a CUNY tuition waiver?

No. Some College Assistants are eligible for tuition reimbursement as through the DC 37 Education Fund benefit. For more information, please go to DC37.net or call DC 37 at (212) 815-1234.

Are College Assistants eligible for paid holidays?

No. As hourly employees, College Assistants are paid for hours actually worked.

CUNY Flexible Spending Accounts Program

When does an hourly employee begin to accrue sick/annual leave?

Civil Service part-time employees must complete 500 hours of work for the fiscal year before using approved annual sick leave. Once the 500-hour threshhold has been met, employees with continuous service may use annual/sick leave as it accrues in subsequent years.

Are full-time doctoral students in Adjunct titles eligible for health insurance?

Full-time doctoral students who are employed in one of the eligible Adjunct titles who earn at least $4,122 per year or at least $2,061 per semester are eligible for NYSHIP.  For more information contact Teena Costabile at 212-817-7700.

Where can I mail or send the workload reporting form?

Workload reporting forms are due in our office by the deadlines established for each semester. After it is completed and has all of the required signatures, you may send your workload reporting form to the Office of Human Resources located in room 8403 at The Graduate Center. The form can be faxed to: (212) 817-1639 or emailed to: HR@gc.cuny.edu.


Are Graduate Assistants eligible for health insurance?

Graduate Assistants are eligible for health insurance coverage.  Health insurance is made available through the Student Employee Health Plan (SEHP), a component of the New York State Health Insurance Program (NYSHIP).

As a Graduate Assistant can I accept other employment within CUNY?

 Employment within CUNY for Graduate Assistants is governed by the workload provisions under Article 15.3 of the Agreement between CUNY and PSC-CUNY.

Graduate students holding the title Graduate Assistant A shall have an assignment of a maximum of 240 contact teaching hours or 450 hours of non-teaching assignments during the academic year (including the summer session) and may not accept any other position within CUNY.
 
Graduate students holding the title Graduate Assistant B shall have an assignment of a maximum of 120 classroom teaching hours or 225 hours of non-teaching assignments during the academic year. If a Graduate Assistant B also holds an adjunct or non-teaching adjunct position, his or her total combined assignment may not exceed 240 contact teaching hours or 450 hours of a non-teaching assignment during the academic year (including the summer session).
 
Graduate students holding the title Graduate Assistant C shall have an assignment of a maximum of 180 classroom teaching hours during the academic year. If a Graduate Assistant C also holds an adjunct position, his or her total combined assignment may not exceed 270 hours during the academic year (including the summer session).

Graduate Students holding the title Graduate Assistant D shall have an assignment of a maximum of 100 hours of a non-teaching assignment during the academic year.  If a GAD also holds an adjunct position, the total combined assignment may not exceed 280 teaching hours or 325 hours of a non-teaching assignment during the academic year (including the summer session).

As a Graduate Assistant do I get paid in the summer months?

Yes, if you have an annual appointment that covers both fall and spring semester, you will be paid during the summer months of July and August.

Can Graduate Assistants teach in the summer?

Summer teaching assignments are based on yearly agreement between CUNY and PSC-CUNY to permit Graduate Assistants to accept assignments in addition to the maximum workload covered in Article 15.3 of the PSC/CUNY collective bargaining agreement. When such Agreements occur, Graduate Assistants may accept summer assignments, subject to the same limitations on hours that apply to full-time and adjunct faculty. Status of such an agreement for each summer is uncertain and Graduate Assistants will be notified if an agreement is reached.

How are Graduate Assistants paid? When can Graduate Assistants expect my first paycheck?

Graduate Assistants are paid on a biweekly basis provided that they have submitted the required documents to the Office of Human Resources for processing their appointments. Graduate Assistants should expect their first paycheck in a timely manner after the start of the semester. Please refer to the “Payroll Calendar” section on our website for payroll dates.

What are the Graduate Center's Graduate Assistant appointment categories?

Program Titles Payroll Contract Titles
Macaulay Honors College Instructional Technology Fellows
CUNY Clinical Psychology Fellows
Graduate Assistant A

Teaching/Non-Teaching GABs

Writing Across the Curriculum Fellows
Graduate Assistant B
Graduate Teaching Fellows Graduate Assistant C
Graduate Assistant D Graduate Assistant D

When does my Graduate Assistant appointment begin and what are the dates of my employment?

Graduate Assistant appointments typically cover a twelve month period from late August through late August of the following year. Occasionally a Graduate Assistant may be appointed for a semester, which covers a six-month period. You may refer to your appointment letter for the specific appointment period and salary information.


Do I accrue 25 days [of leave time] a year?

Non-teaching Instructional employees accrue leave according to the contract based on appointment date and many other factors. Please contact the timekeeper in Human Resources for your accrual rate.

How long do I have to work in the month to accrue time?

15 work days for civil service employees, a full calendar month for Non-teaching Instructional Staff (HEO Series).

Are the timesheet forms on the web?

Yes, the fillable forms are located in the FORMS section of the Human Resources website.

Where can I obtain an employment verification letter?

Graduate Assistants may request employment verification letters by sending an email to the Office of Human Resources at hr@gc.cuny.edu. The Office of Human Resources must have a written consent for release of information. Please allow five-seven business days for the issuance of the letter. Click here for the form.

Why didn’t I receive my paycheck from the Payroll Office?

If you did not elect to enroll in the direct deposit program, you must pick up your paycheck from the Bursar’s window during regular business hours. The Bursar’s window is located opposite the Payroll Office window. If you are enrolled in the direct deposit program, your paycheck stub from the Payroll Office will be mailed to your home address. You may also have a representative pick up your paychecks but they must bring a picture ID and a signed letter authorizing your representative to pick up your paychecks.

Why didn’t my paycheck go into my bank account when I’ve been enrolled in the direct deposit program for a long time?

When you have not worked and received a paycheck for more than 3 payroll periods, the payroll system will automatically terminate you from the direct deposit account program. Should you return to work after you have been off payroll for more than 3 payroll periods, your first pay will be in the form of a check until you contact the Payroll Office in writing to confirm your banking account information.

Where can I obtain information about tuition remission?

Please contact the Financial Aid Office or consult your Executive Officer regarding tuition remission and related matters.

Are sons and daughters of CUNY employees eligible for tuition waivers?

No, none of the collective bargaining Agreements provide this benefit.

Human Subjects IRB

What is the IRB?

An IRB (Institutional Review Board for human participants) is a group of at least five individuals with varying backgrounds to promote complete and adequate review of research studies. An IRB conducts the initial and annual reviews of a research study.

What is research?

Research is defined as a systematic investigation, including pilot research, testing, and evaluation, designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge. Activities that meet this definition constitute research that needs to receive IRB approval before the research can begin.

What is a human participant?

A human participant is a living individual about whom a researcher obtains data through intervention or interaction (interviews) with the individual, or through identifiable private information (data with identifiers).

What is exempt research?

Exempt does not mean exempt from IRB review. The IRB, rather than the researcher, determines when research is exempt. Researchers proposing exempt research should submit an IRB application requesting exempt review. Examples of exempt research include educational tests, surveys, or interviews without individual identification or the use of existing data, documents, or other records without individual identifiers.

How do I know if I should submit a research application to the IRB?

If an investigator's (faculty and students) research project involves any human participants (including observation, interviews, surveys, and data collection), an IRB application must be submitted. (IRB approval cannot be given retroactively.)

It is recommended that PIs look at the Research Determination Form.

At times it is difficult to determine if a project constitutes research under the federal definition of research. The purpose of this form is to solicit sufficient preliminary information from the project staff for the IRB to provide a determination regarding whether the federal human subjects protection regulations apply to the project.
Research involving the use of existing data may not need an Exempt IRB approval. Researchers should submit a Research Determination Form and provide as much information as possible on how thoroughly the data have been de-identified.

Do I need to take training to conduct research with human participants?

Human participant training must be completed by the principal investigator, faculty advisor, and key personnel before an IRB application can receive approval. CUNY uses the Collaborative IRB Initiative Training (CITI) program. The CITI program is a web-based human subjects training program designed and updated by a number of IRB professionals and is housed at the University of Miami. It is used by hundreds of institutions to satisfy the federal regulations training requirement. The direct link is www.citiprogram.org.

What are the review categories of an IRB application?

There are three review categories depending on the potential risk to the participants:
Full Review (high risk) needs full IRB review
Expedited Review (minimal risk) needs two IRB members to review
Exempt Review (low or no risk) and is reviewed by the Chair of the IRB

What criteria do reviewers apply when looking at my research project?

Purpose, methodology, adequate handling of the informed consent, whether the research deals with high risk or sensitive issues and, if so, whether the benefits outweigh the risks, and the degree to which confidentiality is both assured and protected.

What is the difference between anonymity and confidentiality with research subjects?

Anonymity means the researcher has no record of the identity of the participants. For example, having participants mail back questionnaires or hand them back in a group, without names or other unique identifiers. Or working with data where all the identifiers have been removed.

Confidentiality means the researcher knows the identity of the participants but will keep the participants' identity and all identifying characteristics confidential.

What should my application say about risk?

Research participants may be exposed to physical, psychological, social, and economic risks. Very few studies involve no risk.

Do I need IRB approval for oral history interviews?

Yes.

IT

Are there any Kentico CMS tutorials?

With the help of our design team and the Communications & Marketing department, we have amassed a repository of walkthroughs, videos and workshops that are available for your use.

Some of the things you will discover are:
  • Create quick and simple online forms for your users to fill out.  Once a form is generated, it can be placed onto any page as a standard widget.  All the content is available for your review directly from the web page. So, you can see content in place. If required, you can secure the form and its content against non-authorized individuals.

  • All event listings that are created in Kentico are automatically made available to the CUNY website (www.cuny.edu) for inclusion in their feeds, automatically included for display on the Graduate Center calendar and are available in our RSS feeds.

  • News articles are made available in the main GC news listing (as well as other microsites if desired) and are also available in our RSS feeds.

And there are many other great things about Kentico... take a look around or contact us via IT Services. IT Services (formerly The Help Desk) should be your first point of contact for technical assistance.

You may contact us by sending an email to itservices@gc.cuny.edu or by visiting our online self-service portal available 24/7. The self-service portal will allow you to request assistance from IT via a simple web form.


Emergency calls are received between the hours of 9:00 am – 5:00 pm at 212-817-7300.
 

                                                                                                                                                     Last Updated August 13, 2015

Does Information Technology provide online training videos?

Yes.  There are training videos available for key topics such as Blackboard, Kentico, and Argos as shown in the image below.  Please click here to view these videos


Does IT provide or support “local” or “desktop” printers?

How do I configure a separate Outlook profile for a shared mailbox?

How do I send email on behalf of a shared mailbox from my personal mailbox?

What are some frequently asked questions about IT Services?

What are some online survey tools?

Free and paid online survey tools

Note: IT is providing this information as a courtesy, without endorsement of any particular product or service. Any intended purchase of software to be installed and run locally at the Graduate Center must be discussed and coordinated with IT in advance.

What discounts are available through the University for personal purchases of computer hardware or software?

What is the process by which a department at the GC purchases computer hardware or software?

Does the GC Self-Service Password Reset program allow me to reset my Office 365 password?

No. The GC Self-Service Password reset tool allows you to change or reset your GC network password via the web. It is not affiliated with your Office 365 account.

Does Office 365 have a Self-Service Password Reset tool?

Yes, it does. However, before you can use the Office 365 Self-Service Password Reset tool, you must register your account.

How to Register for the Office 365 Self-Service Password-Reset Tool

Once you have registered, if you ever forget your password, you can go here to reset it.

How to Perform a Self-Service Password Reset

If you should ever need to update your registration information, please review this guide:

How to Update Contact Information for the Office 365 Self-Service Password-Reset Tool

Does Microsoft provide any training or support options for Office 365?

Microsoft created a welcome video to introduce Office 365 and its features. If you have never used Office 365 before, we recommend that you take a look. Note: SkyDrive is now OneDrive. Also, keep in mind that not all features of Office 365 are enabled so your menu options may be slightly different than what you see in the video.

Office 365 Welcome Video

Microsoft has free online training webinars and videos that are available to you to view at your leisure.

Training

You can also download printable Office 2013 reference guides.

Quick Start Guides

Microsoft also created their own support resource page for Office 365. From this page you can access troubleshooting options and view previously reported Office 365 issues.

Office 365 Support

How do I add a GC network printer to a PC?

How do I connect to a departmental archive drive from a Mac?

How do I connect to the GCcommunity wireless network using Windows 7?

How do I convert a PDF to text using Adobe Acrobat Pro and Microsoft Word?

How do I access the GC network U drive via remote computing using my Mac?

How do I access the U drive from my pc computer through remote computing?

How do I connect to the GCcommunity wireless network using Mac OSX?

How do I install a remote computing receiver for Linux?

How do I install McAfee Antivirus software from the CUNY portal?

How do I navigate Internet Native Banner (INB)?

How do I recover files and folders from the S and U drives?

How do I register for a new CUNY portal account, reset or change my password, or retrieve my username?

How do I open a non-human mailbox, such as the English Student Association, from my desktop version of Outlook?

If you currently monitor a non-human mailbox, such as the English Student Association, you can configure your desktop version of Outlook to connect directly to that mailbox. This action is performed by creating an Outlook profile for the desired mailbox.

If you have not previously monitored a non-human mailbox but now require access to one, you must first contact IT Services (ITServices@gc.cuny.edu). IT Services will open a ticket to grant you access permissions for the mailbox. Once this has been completed, they will notify you and you can then configure your desktop version of Outlook to connect to the non-human mailbox.


Below are the steps for configuring Outlook for a non-human mailbox from a MAC.
Configuring-Outlook-for-a-Non-Human-Mailbox-(MAC)_V1

Below are the steps for configuring Outlook for a non-human mailbox from a PC.
Configuring-Outlook-for-a-Non-Human-Mailbox-(PC)_V5



 

How do I install the Office 365 software and set up email on my personal devices? (Students Only)

First, please check Microsoft's support page to determine if your device meets the minimum system requirements for installation.

If your device meets the minimum system requirements, follow the instructions provided by CUNY CIS in the document below.

How-to-download-a-copy-of-Microsoft-Office

Microsoft's support page also contains additional installation instructions for PCs, Macs, and mobile devices.

Install Office Using Office 365

Install Apps on Mobile Devices

Phone and Tablet Setup Reference

How to set up email in Mac OS X

How to set up email on Apple iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch

How do I log in to my Office 365 student email account?

How do I update my email address on a GC listserv?

It is our recommendation that you update your email address to your @gradcenter.cuny.edu email address on any listservs to which you subscribe.

How-do-I-update-my-email-address-on-a-GC-listserv

 

How does this affect how I use library tools and services? (Students Only)

For off-campus access to library databases and journals, use your GC network (not Office 365 email) account.

To sign in to the Interlibrary Loan System (ILLiad), use your GC network (not Office 365 email) account.

If you currently have Interlibrary Loan notifications sent to another email address, please update your email address in ILLiad to your Office 365 email address.

If you currently have library circulation notifications sent to another email address, please update your email address at the Graduate Center Library's Circulation Desk.

How long do items remain in the Office 365 Outlook Deleted Items and Junk Email Folders?

How can I receive my GC email at my home institution email address?

Does the GC Self-Service Password Reset program allow me to reset my Office 365 password?

No. The GC Self-Service Password reset tool allows you to change or reset your GC network password via the web. It is not affiliated with your Office 365 account.

Please review the documents below to learn how to reset your Office 365 password.

How to Register for the Office 365 Self Service Password Reset Tool?

How to Perform a Self Service Password Reset?

May I auto-forward email from my Office 365 email account to an external email account?

No, the Office 365 system configuration precludes automatic forwarding of email from your Office 365 student email account to an external email account in order to safeguard the University's ability to communicate effectively via email. For more information, see the University-CIO-Letter.

For the best experience, we strongly recommend that you connect to your Office 365 student email account using Outlook Web App, or through an email program that supports Exchange ActiveSync access such as Outlook 2013, Outlook 2010, Outlook for Mac 2011, Apple Mail 10.6 Snow Leopard, Apple Mail 10.7 Lion, or Entourage 2008 Web Services Edition.

Connecting to your Office 365 based email account using POP3 or IMAP4 only lets you send and receive mail. You can't access your contacts, tasks, or calendar when you connect to your account using POP3 or IMAP4. For instructions on how to do so, visit Microsoft's support page.

What are Microsoft's privacy policies?

To view Microsoft’s statements on privacy, use the following link:

https://privacy.microsoft.com/en-us/privacy

 

How do I search in Banner?

How do I setup an Android phone with a Graduate Center e-mail account (IMAP)?

How do I store and share departmental documents?

How do I use collaboration in Blackboard?

How do I change my GC password using Self-Service?

Does IT provide technical support for personal (home) computers?

How do I use USB/CD/DVD encryption?

How do I clean duplicate IDs within Internet Native Banner (INB)?

How do I log into Self Service Banner (SSB) and Internet Native Banner (INB)?

How do I perform common matching within Internet Native Banner (INB)?

How do I install a remote computing receiver on an Android device?

How do I register for GC Password reset?

How do I update/store my GC passwords in Outlook and mobile devices?

Is there a audio conference system available for use?

The Graduate Center has a new conference management system, which allows GC faculty, staff, and students to easily set up and manage conference calls. The system, Sonexis ConferenceManager, enables conference users to schedule, launch, and record conferences.
 
Hosts can schedule conference calls via Microsoft Office or the web interface, and attendees will receive automatic email invitations and reminders. The Conference Management tool also offers several advanced features allowing participants to easily see who is speaking through the web interface, while the host can identify participants by name and divide participants into subconferences.
 
The Graduate Center has the capability to host numerous conference calls at a time, capped at 48 lines. For conference calls with international participants, there is an 800 number that can be utilized.
 
Access the system at http://conference.gc.cuny.edu or through the GC Portal. To become familiar with the system, read the user guide and/or Outlook Add-on tip or watch an introductory video.

How do I use Proofpoint anti-spam software at the GC?

What does the Office 365 plan include?

Office-365-Plan-for-Students

Office-365-Plan-for-Graduates

Note: Six months following your date of graduation, your Office 365 account will be converted to graduate status. As a graduate, you will continue to have access to your email, calendar, and contacts. However, you will lose access to any documents you saved on OneDrive and you will only have view or read access to the other Office 365 applications. We recommend you move any files that you wish to keep off of OneDrive before your 180-day grace period concludes. If you wish to continue using the full versions of the other Office 365 applications, you will need to purchase licenses from Microsoft.

What happens to my GC mailbox if I am an employee as well as a student?

What hardware is available at the GC?

What is Argos?

What is some basic information about ListServ mailing lists?

What is some basic information that can help me understand wired and wireless network access at the GC?

How do I set up a conference call?

How do I use voicemail at the GC?

What are basic instructions for using the Avaya 3720 Cordless Phone

What are basic instructions for using the GC office telephone?

What audio- and video-conferencing services are available via the GC IT resources?

What is Adobe Connect?

What is Blackboard?

View your courses.

If you are a student, you will see a list of courses for which you are registered for (and is set to be available by the instructor.)

What is Blackboard?


Click here to view other documents.


Does the GC have an online document management solution?

What is the difference between my email account and my network account?

Your xxxx@gradcenter.cuny.edu account is used exclusively for the Office 365 student email system, and is separate from your GC network account. Your GC network account is used exclusively to access the Graduate Center's online resources and various other systems.

If you are logging into student email your username is astudent@gradcenter.cuny.edu. If you are logging into any other resource or system, your username is "astudent".

NOTE: As your email account and network account are separate, they have separate passwords which do not synchronize.

What is Website Services?

What options are available for mitigating Wi-Fi connectivity issues in individual units in the GC Apartment Building?

What software is available at the GC?

What software licensing is available via the University?

What to do if Keychain Access asks for your keychain password after you've changed your login password on a Mac?

How do I use Blackboard as a student?

How do I change my GC network account password?

How do I contact IT Services?

How do I log in to the GC’s computers?

How do I self-manage my IT Services tickets?

How do I set up my home pc to access the GC network?

Where do I store my personal files?

How do I access a retiree email account in the @RET.GC.CUNY.EDU domain?

Who should I contact if I have questions about Student Web access or the GC Library resources?

Liberal Studies

How would you describe the typical MALS student?

MALS students are academically oriented people who value a challenging, multidisciplinary scholarly experience and enjoy contributing to and learning from a lively intellectual community.  Read what MALS student have to say about the program here.

May I transfer credit from other graduate programs?

The Liberal Studies Program will accept a maximum of 12 credits earned in another graduate program toward the 30 credits required for the M.A. Please send the following to the Assistant Program Officer, Kathy Koutsis (kkoutsis@gc.cuny.edu): semester, course title, grade, brief description, and a CUNY GC course that you deem equivalent. Your request will be reviewed by the Executive Officer of the program. The following restrictions apply to these transfer credits:
 

  • The course(s) must have been completed with a grade of B or higher;
  • The course(s) must be comparable to courses offered by the Graduate Center (courses in creative or professional writing are not acceptable for transfer credit);
  • The course(s) must not be credited towards a prior graduate degree. If you have a prior graduate degree, you can transfer only credits that you earned in excess of the credits required for that degree.

Is the Masters in Liberal Studies program right for me?

The diversity of tracks and the interdisciplinary nature of the MALS program make it an appropriate academic choice for a wide variety of students with many different goals. The program is suited to those who have a professional, intellectual, academic, or personal objective for which the pursuit of scholarly graduate study in the arts and sciences is required or beneficial. Most of our students pursue careers in research and/or teaching upon graduation; many enroll in order to hone their intellectual focus for future doctoral work; and still others make the commitment to address an area of personal intellectual curiosity. We welcome inquiries from prospective students and would be happy to schedule a pre-application informational interview to answer any questions you may have.

May I take courses at other CUNY institutions or at universities within the consortial system?

No, MALS students can only take courses offered at the Graduate Center.
The consortial arrangement is open only to doctoral students.

Can I create my own area of specialization within the Liberal Studies Program?

Students can choose one of the recognized tracks and take two required core courses in that area. For greater latitude in choosing electives, students can consider specializing in one of the broader tracks such as Western Intellectual Traditions, American Studies, Digital Humanities, or Approaches to Modernity. Students may also take other Liberal Studies courses if desired. in addition. We do not currently offer a degree made up entirely of elective courses.

How do I apply to the MALS program?

Applicants must meet the following criteria in order to be eligible for admission:
 

  1. hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university or its equivalent, with a cumulative overall GPA of 3.0 (B average) or higher;

  2. submit transcripts of all college or graduate work;

  3. submit two letters of recommendation;

  4. submit a personal statement (an academic writing sample is not required), the preferred length for personal statements is 1000 words.

 
Admission to the program must ultimately be approved by the Executive Committee.
 
Please consult the Graduate Center website for upcoming admissions deadlines and requirements. Prospective students may apply using these application instructions and forms.
 
**As of April 2013, the GRE is no longer required as part of the application for the MALS program.**

How do I choose a track?

Students choose a track to explore a topic that interests them, to fill in gaps in their education, and to enhance their resumes (read below about the benefits of a MALS degree). When researching which track to choose, you should check the track's webpage for a general description, requirements, associated faculty, and course offerings. In addition, you can visit the webpages of related Graduate Center programs -- doctoral, master'scertificate, and interdisciplinary -- and read detailed descriptions of the courses offered. You can also contact faculty and/or MALS advisors to answer further questions.
A summary of MALS program requirements and a list of all tracks can be found here (individual track webpages are accessible through the right-hand menu).

Can I enroll as a part-time student? What counts as part-time?

Yes, students can enroll for one or more courses per semester. Please visit the Tuition and Fees for current information.

Can I create my own area of specialization within the Liberal Studies Program?

Students must select one of the twenty-one tracks of study and complete the associated core course requirements for that track. Electives may be selected from any of the courses offered in the MALS program or the Graduate Center.

Can I change my track?

Yes, you can change your track at any point during the course of your program. In order to do so, please notify the MALS office via email (liberalstudies@gc.cuny.edu). You will be expected to meet all course requirements associated with the new track. Core courses taken in a different track may count towards the required 18 credits of electives, but not as core courses in the new track.
 

Can I start in the Spring semester?

Yes. Please see the GC’s Application Deadlines page for current deadlines.

May I transfer credit from other graduate programs?

A maximum of 12 credits earned prior to matriculation to MALS may be accepted. In order to be eligible for transfer, the courses must be comparable to courses offered by the PhD programs at the Graduate Center and must have been completed with a grade of B or higher. Courses in creative or professional writing are not eligible for transfer credit.

In what way can I use a MALS degree to further career goals outside of Academia?

Choosing a track that will give you new expertise is one way that a MALS degree can further your career goals.  For instance, a student interested in working with immigrants could choose the Global Migration track. Choosing the Urban Education track could give you expertise for working in museums and with education non-profits. Students who select the Digital Humanities track or take courses in the track learn many highly useful technical skills that employers are often looking for. Skills honed by writing papers and giving presentations in class, such as being able to write clearly and communicate well, can also advance your career.
Getting involved in various Graduate Center activities can further advance your career goals. For example, involvement in the MALS Student Association is an opportunity to serve in a leadership capacity.

May I take courses at other CUNY institutions or at other universities within the consortial system?

No, MALS students can only take courses offered at the Graduate Center.
The consortial arrangement is open only to doctoral students.

Is there a student leadership group for me to get involved in and meet other students?

Yes. There is a MALS Student Association and a MALS Student Group on the CUNY Academic Commons.

All MALS students are automatically members of the Student Association, which provides funding for student events and communicates student concerns and needs to the Program's Executive Officer and Deputy Executive Officer. To get involved, look out for upcoming events and meetings which are announced in the MALS Student Group on the Academic Commons.

MALS Student Group: This is a MALS student-only group based on the Academic Commons. In order to join the group you will first need a valid GC e-mail account. You will be assigned a GC e-mail account 3-5 days after you register for courses. Use that e-mail to create an account on the CUNY Academic Commons. Once you're registered, visit the MALS Student Group and join the group.


Can I take courses outside the Liberal Studies Program?

Yes, the program is designed so that students can choose courses from the various doctoral program offerings, depending on their chosen track as well as their specific interests. Students must take two courses in a single track within the program (6 credits) along with the Introduction to Graduate Liberal Studies (3 credits). They are encouraged to take most of the other 18 credits of course work in the various Ph.D. programs.

Where can I find funding for my degree?

GC librarians have put together a great resource on funding that lists all of the major databases.

Some of these may be subscription databases accessible only to registered students.  But, if you scroll down, you’ll see the Michigan, UCLA, and Duke databases that are open access.

In book form, there is also April Vahle Hamel’s Graduate School Funding Handbook (Penn Press, 2010), which walks you through the process (Jenny Furlong wrote the chapter on postdocs), and Pearson’s Getting Money for Graduate School (2003, so maybe a bit outdated).

You can also check the Graduate Center's webpage on outside funding sources.

What is the tuition fee?

You can look up the current tuition rates on the GC Tuition and Fees page. Under "Tuition Rates"  click on the corresponding academic year and scroll down to "Master's Students."


Can you describe the profile of your typical student?

Our student population is diverse and resists easy caricature. Some of our students are recent college graduates who have decided to pursue graduate study; some are librarians seeking a second Master’s degree; some are retired professionals taking courses for personal edification; others are seeking a career change. We welcome inquiries from prospective students and regularly set up pre-application informational interviews.

What financial aid is available?

Federal work-study awards are available to qualified applicants. Please see the Financial Aid Office’s website for more information.
The Graduate Center does not offer any institutional aid to Master's students. Please visit the GC's resource on outside funding sources.

Does the Graduate Center offer career planning services for Master’s students?

Yes. You may find sources specifically designed for Master’s students in interviewing, networking, job searching, resume building, and applying for a PhD through the Office of Career Planning and Professional Development.

Does the program offer classes at night or on weekends?

A number of courses are offered on weeknights from 6:30-8:30 pm. There are no weekend classes.

Can I enroll as a part-time student?

Yes, students can enroll for one or more courses per semester. Please visit the Tuition and Fees page for current information.

Is there someone to advise me on career opportunities associated with my studies?

Individual departments and programs sometimes run career workshops. Check their websites for more information. Speak to faculty, advisors, and other students.

How large are the classes?

The typical class size is about 12-15 students.

How can I find teaching or administrative jobs in the academy?

A Master’s degree, along with an excellent academic record and recommendations, can be enough to qualify for a position in a two-year college.   A Ph.D. is a requirement for teaching jobs in four-year institutions.  Even jobs that emphasize teaching will also require research and publication.  Professor jobs are listed with field-specific organizations and in journals, such as the Chronicle of Higher Ed, which are aimed at an academic readership.

A Master’s or a Ph.D. degree in the Humanities or Social Sciences can be a strong qualification for administrative posts in the academic world even in the absence of a professional degree in administration. These degrees show that you have reading, writing, technical, and research skills and, in addition, have some knowledge of how the academic world works.

How long does it usually take to earn the degree?

Courses are offered during the fall and spring semesters. Students who take two classes per semester can expect to complete the 30-credit degree in two and a half years.

How long does it usually take to earn the degree?

Students who take two classes per semester can expect to complete the 30-credit degree in two and a half years.

Where are academic jobs listed?

The career services is a good place to start when looking for these jobs.  Often, colleges and universities have their own job-listings.  Here are some other good listings to check:
 

How large are the classes?

The typical class size is about 12-15 students.

May I take courses at other universities within the consortial system?

The doctoral consortial arrangement is open only to students enrolled in a doctoral (not master’s) program.

Where are jobs outside of academia listed?

Here are some of the many websites:

For help in your job search, visit the webpage of the Office of Career Planning or make an appointment to see Dr. Jennifer Furlong, the director of the Office of Career Planning and Professional Development at the Graduate Center. Dr. Furlong also organizes panels and events for students searching for jobs.


Must I take the GRE? What is the Average or Minimum Score?

No, the GRE is not required.

Each application is reviewed as a whole with all elements of the application package carefully considered. The committee pays attention to the student’s record of academic achievement as reflected in the transcripts, the student’s potential for graduate work as demonstrated by recommendations, and the student’s background and reasons for pursuing an M.A. at The Graduate Center, as expressed in the personal statement.

If I enter with some completed graduate work, will those credits transfer?
The Liberal Studies Program will accept toward the 30 credits for the M.A. a maximum of 12 credits earned in another graduate program. The following restrictions apply to these transfer credits:

  • Must have been completed with a grade of B or higher.

  • Must be comparable to courses offered by the Ph.D. programs at The Graduate Center. (Courses in creative or professional writing are not acceptable for transfer credit.)

In what ways can I seek out help in becoming a PhD candidate?

Seek out help from as many people as you can at the Graduate Center, your undergraduate institution, and the university and department where you are thinking of applying.  Professors, fellow students, program administrators, admissions officers, and career-service placement specialists all have something to offer to make you a strong Ph.D. candidate.   All of these people can help a Ph.D. candidate with essential information about institutions, faculty, grants, and the admissions process.  A successful Ph.D. candidate should have a research agenda and know the institution and professors where this agenda would best fit.  The personal statement and writing sample benefits from multiple readers.  It is important that someone familiar with the conventions of the subject read both.

What kind of jobs do graduates find after completing the degree?

The majority of our students go on to careers in education, publishing, media, and non-profit work. Many MALS alumni pursue further graduate work in a doctoral program. The advanced critical thinking, communication, and analytical skills students learn in the MALS program are beneficial to nearly any academic or professional environment.

What financial aid is available?

Federal work-study awards are available to qualified applicants. Please see the Financial Aid Office’s website for more information.

Does the program offer classes at night or on weekends?

A number of courses are offered on weeknights from 6:30-8:30 pm. There are no weekend classes.

What kind of jobs do graduates find after completing the degree?

Some people stay in the jobs they have; some will be qualified for advancement because of this additional degree; some apply for doctoral study; others find that this new degree will equip them to find a variety of new positions in business, media, education, and social programs.

How do I find a thesis advisor?

A thesis advisor is usually one of your professors. Thesis advisors must be members of the Graduate Center faculty. They do not need to be faculty members within the MALS Program.  
Your thesis advisor should teach in a field related to your track and have some knowledge about the subject of your thesis. Given that the thesis is interdisciplinary and original, it is unlikely that any single professor will have an expertise in everything about your thesis.   Ideally, choose a professor with whom you have been able to work well in the past. Other students have found that this compatibility is more important than subject-matter expertise. Remember that your thesis advisor is not the only professor to whom you can turn for help or advice on your thesis.

Can I take summer courses?

No. No summer courses are offered at the Graduate Center.

When can I apply to the program?

Please see the GC’s Application Deadlines page for current deadlines.

Are there fellowships and scholarships available for MALS students?

There is no institutional aid for Master’s students; however, there is federal aid. 
International students can look up their eligibility for financial aid at the website of the Office of US Department of Education.

Federal Aid Information
 
A few key points: Students must be registered for at least 6 credits to receive federal aid (Perkins, work study, Stafford and Graduate PLUS).  The amount of federal aid a student is eligible for is based on the number of credits the student registers for, a standardized cost of living amount, and the student’s financial need.  If a student drops from 9 to 6 credits, their aid eligibility decreases by the cost of those three credits.   If a student drops from 6 to 3 credits, all of their federal aid would be cancelled.
 
If a student completely withdraws from all classes prior to the 60% point of the the policy on our website comes into effect.  The 60% point is also when students who completely withdraw are entitled to keep their loans.  Any student who completely withdraws from their classes will give up any remaining work study eligibility.
 
For detailed information, visit http://www.gc.cuny.edu/Prospective-Current-Students/Current-Students/Financial-Assistance/Withdrawals.  
 

Do you offer online courses?

No.

Where are classes held, and how often do they meet?

All classes meet at the Graduate School and University Center, 365 Fifth Avenue, at 34th Street. Most classes meet once a week.

Do MALS students have a space to study and socialize?

Yes. The MALS Student Study in Room 4109 has computers, a printer, lockers, a large table, and a couch. The Student Study is maintained and stocked by the MALS Student Association. Please be considerate and respectful. 

Why should I apply to the Liberal Studies Program?

Students apply to the program for a variety of reasons: (1) They have an intellectual project they wish to pursue; (2) They need or want a Master’s Degree; (3) They are interested in a particular field offered in one of the nineteen MALS tracks; (4) They are attracted to the options for interdisciplinary study offered by the MALS program; (5) They are thinking of Ph.D. work but are unsure of the particular course of study they wish to pursue; (6) They are interested in studying with the distinguished faculty of the CUNY Graduate Center.

Is there a common area for people from different disciplines to socialize?

There are various lounges and dining facilities at the GC, including the Robert E. Gilleece Student Center. Click here for more information.

Will I be writing a Master’s thesis?

Yes. The final three credits for the thirty-credit degree are for MALS 79000, Thesis Research. Students should begin thinking about a thesis topic, and choosing a thesis adviser, when they have accumulated about eighteen credits. The adviser should be an instructor who is interested in the proposed thesis project. The required thesis should be fifty to sixty pages long.

How do I find out what is going on around the university?

The Graduate Center sponsors numerous events and lectures. They are advertised prominently on the website and in the elevators.  There are many separate centers, programs, and departments that also host events at the GC.  It is a good idea to explore the GC website and even the building to find out about all of them.  
The Center for the Humanities hosts many smaller seminars and workshops in addition to large public events.  You can go to their suite of offices on the Sixth Floor to find out about their offerings.  It is a good idea to get on the email lists of programs and centers that interest you. You may also visit the Graduate Center calendar for campus events.

What other benefits do I get as a CUNY student?

CUNY students benefit from the Cultural Passport that gives students access to many cultural institutions in NYC for free or at a discount. Also visit CUNY Central’s website for more information.

Is there a place where I can go for my health and well-being?

Yes. Visit the Wellness Center in the GC.

Are there any health insurance options for students?

You may find health insurance options on the GC Health and Wellness website. On that page, there is a detailed Student Health Insurance Guide under "Uninsured Students."

Nursing Science

Where do I find The Graduate Center Academic Calendar?

To view the Graduate Center academic calender click here.

Are there any tuition benefits if I am a full-time CUNY faculty member or a CUNY adjunct?

Full-time CUNY faculty members and CUNY adjuncts should contact their home colleges to see if they are eligible for tuition-waivers.

Can I go part time?

No. The PhD program was designed to be a full-time, cohort program. Students are admitted once per year, in the Fall semester, and progress through the program together.

How does the DNS degree differ from the PhD?

Both are research doctorates, concerned with theory testing. However, the DNS is focused on testing theory specifically related to nursing sensitive patient outcomes.

How long is the PhD program?

The program coursework and dissertation seminar are designed to be completed in a 6 semester period.  Additional 3-credit semesters of dissertation seminar may be necessary until the dissertation is completed. The PhD will take four years to complete.

How many credits is the PhD program?

The coursework is 50 credits.  Additional dissertation seminar credits may be necessary.

I'm an international student. What do I need to know about applying to the program?

Translations and evaluation of transcripts from colleges outside the U.S. must be completed early in the application process.  The Office of International Students at the Graduate Center collects the documents and issues the I-20.  Please refer to the graduate catalog or graduate application for more detailed information.

Is financial aid offered?

For information about financial aid please click here.

What are the admissions criteria for the CUNY Nursing PhD Program?

For information on admissions criteria for the CUNY Nursing PhD Program, please click here.

What are the graduation requirements?

Satisfactory completion of the following:

  • 50 credits in the nursing program
  • First examination
  • Second examination
  • The dissertation

What if I have not taken all of the required prerequisite courses?

Please speak with the program adviser concerning options.

What is the PhD in Nursing?

The PhD in Nursing is a research degree for post masters level nurses. Candidates for the PhD in Nursing must write a dissertation.

What is the First Examination?

The First Examination is administered after 20 credits of doctoral study have been completed. It is a written examination that consists of essay questions representing core content in nursing science and nursing knowledge, measurement, health disparities and policy initiatives. If the First Examination is not passed the first time, the student must pass the retest administered during the following semester. The student must pass the retest in order to remain in the program.

What is The Graduate Center Tuition?

To learn about the Graduate Center's tuition and fees click here.

Please Note:
All fees and tuition charges are subject to change by action of the Board of Trustees of The City University of New York without prior notice.

What is the Second Examination?

The Second Examination is a two-part examination. Part one consists of a written preliminary research proposal. Part two consists of an oral presentation of the written research proposal and response to questions posed by the Examination Committee.

What will the PhD prepare me to do?

The PhD in Nursing will prepare you to conduct research focused on nursing sensitive patient outcomes in many settings. In addition, those who have earned a PhD are eligible to hold positions in academia.

When will I reach Level 2?

Once 20 credits of coursework at The Graduate Center are completed, students will take the First Examination. Students will be advanced to Level 2 after successful completion of the First Examination and 45 credits of coursework.

Where and when are the classes held?

Classes will be held at The Graduate Center of CUNY on Fridays from 9:00am to 6:30pm

Ombuds

What does "Ombuds" mean?

Ombud, a common word in the Swedish language, means the people's representative, agent, attorney, solicitor, deputy, proxy, or delegate.

What is the Ombuds Office, and what does an ombuds do?

The Ombuds Office is a confidential, informal, impartial, and non-adversarial alternative for the resolution of work-related problems and conflicts. We are a designated neutral in handling such issues.

Who can use your office?

Along with students and faculty, any staff employee, student employee, supervisor, manager or executive can use our services.

What do you mean by conflict and what kinds of issues can you help with?

The Ombuds Office can informally help with many issues involving many kinds of conflict in the workplace. We can provide an outside perspective on a work-related problem, or ust a confidential and informal sounding board to discuss options for handling a particular dilemma. Conflicts between co-workers, between manager and employee, or between managers involving communication problems, treatment issues, job status worries, organizational difficulties and many, many other issues of concern in the Graduate Center work environment can be confidentially discussed in this office.

What exactly do you mean by saying that the Ombuds Office is impartial—doesn't the University pay your salary? How is your office different from other CUNY offices that deal with employee issues?

The Graduate School does pay the Ombuds officer's salary, but it established an Ombuds Office in 1993 as a campus resource for informal resolution of workplace conflicts and concerns, fully understanding that the role requires independence, impartiality, and neutrality. The Ombuds Office remains informal and neutral throughout your relationship with the office. We do not advocate for any one side, but are enthusiastic advocates for fairness, equity, justice, and humane treatment in the workplace.

What if I want to take formal action on my situation?

You should try to resolve your concerns informally through available channels before resorting to the formal. Talking to us, however, does not preclude your using formal complaint and grievance procedures if your attempts at informal resolution don't succeed. Once an employee begins working with a representative in order to invoke a formal process, this office cannot participate, assist, or interfere.

Philosophy

What do I need to prepare for a job search?

The first thing you will need is a curriculum vitae (CV).

Your initial contact with a department in which you seek a position will in all probability be through a cover letter indicating that you are applying for a job there (more about the cover letter below) accompanied by your CV. How well you present yourself in your CV will in all probability determine whether your candidacy for the position is further considered. It is therefore very important for you to construct your CV in a way best highlights those aspects of your education, training, and experience that make you an attractive candidate for the job that you are applying for. To this end, your CV you should include the following:

  1. Your educational experience, i.e., where you went to school and what you majored and minored in;

  2. Any degrees you have earned (along with expected date of completion of your Ph.D. if you have not yet completed it);

  3. The title of your Ph.D. thesis. (Including the name of your thesis advisor or the people on your thesis committee is also a good idea.);

  4. Honors and awards that you have received (including money grants);

  5. Academic publications: books, journal articles, book reviews, Introductions to others' books, collections of articles that you have anthologized and edited. Include publications of which you are the sole or the joint author or editor, but indicate which publications you have jointly authored or edited (and with whom);

  6. Talks you have given (at colloquia or at conferences);

  7. Jobs that you have held that have provided you with experience relevant to the position that you are now applying for, including teaching assistantships, grader, and working as a tutor or substitute teacher;

  8. Two or three people who may be contacted and who can speak to your achievements, potential, and suitability for the job. Make sure that each of the persons whose names you include agrees to be a referee for you. It is also a good idea to have these people write a letter on your behalf that should be placed in your Placement file. (More about your Placement file below.)

All the items in categories 1-7 should be listed chronologically, with dates specified.

It is a good idea to bring in a hard copy draft of your CV to the Philosophy Department Placement Officer who will go over it with you and, if necessary, make suggestions for its improvement.

The second thing you will need is a cover letter.
Although one and the same CV will serve for most jobs that you are applying for, the cover letter you send as part of your application should be tailored to the specific job you are applying for.

Nonetheless, it would be useful for you to construct a "template" which could be filled in in various ways according to the specification of different jobs. One of the reasons that it is good to have a template ready is that sometimes jobs are announced with little time to assemble all the documents required for application. It is best to have as must prepared beforehand as possible. Your cover letter should indicate the exact position to which you are applying and, in general terms-the details will be supplied in your CV), your qualifications for the job. State when you will be available for an interview and where you can be reached. Finally, if someone known to the department suggested that you apply, it is a good idea to include the name of that person.

The third thing you may need is a writing sample.
Note that this is not always required.

The sample might be a short paper that you have done for a course or some article you have sent in for publication. If you are applying for a position at an undergraduate institution in which your duties will be primarily teaching duties, do not send in a very technical paper as your sample. On the other hand, if you are applying for a position at a research institution where you will be expected to be teaching graduate students as well as undergraduates, a detailed and technical paper as a writing sample is appropriate.

The fourth thing you will need are recommendations.

You should assemble at least three letters from those who are professionally qualified to judge your work and who will attest to the quality of your work and your attractiveness as a candidate for a position in philosophy.

Choose as your referees persons who are well acquainted with your work so that they can write about you in some detail. A letter from your dissertation advisor is advisable as s/he is likely to know your work especially well. In addition, if you are already teaching, a letter from the department head or from one your colleagues who can attest to your teaching abilities and value as a faculty member is a good idea.

Letters of recommendation are almost never sent directly by you to the place you are applying to. They are either sent directly by your referee or, if you wish, via the Placement Services of the Graduate Center. (See the answer to the next question for more information concerning the GC Placement Service.)

If you use the Placement Service of the GC, make sure that your letters of reference are up to date, especially if you are applying for a position long after your reference letters have been written and there is relevant new information that should be included in your letters. Updating your letter may take the form of having your referees write new letters, having them write addenda to letters already written, or having new referees add to the stock of letters you already have on file.

Three letters of recommendation are usually deemed sufficient.

How do I use the Placement Services of the Graduate Center?

To use the placement services of the GC, go to the Office of Student Affairs (located on the 7th floor) and fill out a card that will initiate the opening of a file for you. You will also be asked to fill out some standard forms with biographical information about yourself (such as the course work you have completed, work experience, citizenship status, educational background, etc.). Once you have established a file in the Office of Student Affairs you may ask your referees to send (or fax) their recommendations directly to that office. If you have your recommendations sent by fax to the Office of Student Affairs, have it directed to the attention of Judy Koster, to be placed in your file. (The Student Affairs office has special forms that can be given to your referees, but your referees can also write their letters of reference on official letterhead.)

Once you have established a file at the Office of Student Affairs you don't have to bother your referees every time you apply for a position. All you need do is request that the Office of Student Affairs send out a copy of your recommendations (or entire file) to prospective employers. (The Office of Student Affairs will, however, act only upon a written request containing your name, department, and exactly what you would like mailed out, i.e., all reference letters in the file, some letters in the file, or the complete dossier.) You must supply duplicate labels for each mailing-one for the mailing envelope and one for the file. For fewer than 10 requests, there is no charge for the service that the Student Affairs office provides. Requests in excess of 10 are charged a $1.00 per request fee.

Note that other materials of your application, such as your CV, transcripts, and writing sample, etc. are not handled by the Student Affairs office, but are sent separately by you to wherever it is that you are applying.

Since many of the documents required in an application may take considerable time to assemble, it is best to embark on the construction of your dossier as soon as you have made some headway on your dissertation and have people who can and are willing to write on your behalf. Do not leave this till the last minute.

Webmaster's note: Since the original publication of this FAQ, the Graduate Center now provides Dossier Services through Interfolio Inc. This service stores and delivers applications materials.

How do I find out about job offers?

Job offers are made known to students in various ways: sometimes job offerings for adjunct positions are phoned in to the department and then made known to students through the Assistant Program Office, Rosemary Iannuzzi. This is true for many positions at the various CUNY undergraduate campuses, as well as for non-CUNY colleges within the metropolitan area.

The best source for a listing of full-time positions- both academic and non-academic -that are on offer in philosophy is through the American Philosophical Association's Jobs for Philosophers. Jobs for Philosophers is published 4 times a year and is mailed free of charge to all APA members who request it. The publication can also be accessed (by APA members) through the APA Website.

The listing of jobs in Jobs for Philosophers is by geographic location. Each listing contains a description of the position on offer including the nature of the courses to be taught and the course load, the area of specialization and/or competence sought, departmental duties other than teaching (for example, thesis supervision, curriculum planning, and departmental meetings), the rank and salary range, the essential and the desirable credentials and qualifications for the job, and whether the position is a tenure-track one or a Visiting position (and for how long). Each listing also details the documents that must be sent in as part of the application, the deadline for receipt of the application, and the address to which the documents should be sent.

Job listings that come in too late to be placed in Jobs for Philosophers are posted on a bulletin board at the Eastern Division Annual Meetings, usually under the heading Job Postings. (See below for using the Job Postings and the APA Placement Service.)

Students should be aware that although Jobs for Philosophers is probably the best source for philosophy jobs, The Chronicle of Higher Education also contains a list of academic and administrative positions for which philosophy graduates may be qualified. (The Graduate Center library, as well as most public libraries, carries The Chronicle.)

What else can I do to prepare?

a) Practice being interviewed.

Most departments fill their job vacancies only upon meeting and interviewing a number of prospective candidates. For this reason it is best to learn how to present oneself to one's best advantage in an interview. This is a skill best worked on before the interview when a prospective job is not at stake. To help you prepare for your interview, the Placement Officer can set up a mock interview during which some faculty members from the Placement committee (or chosen by the Placement committee) will "interview" you, asking the sorts of questions that are typically asked of job candidates. You will learn how you field different sorts of questions, the sorts of things you should be thinking about (for example, how you would answer the question of what you would include in an introductory philosophy course for non-majors; how you would explain your thesis to members of a philosophy department to which you may be applying but who do not work within your particular field of interest; how you would construct a seminar around a particular topic that you might be asked to teach). At the end of the mock interview, the interviewing faculty will talk with you about the strengths and the weaknesses of your performance and answer any questions that you might have.

From what students have told us, the experience of the mock interview is one of the most helpful services that the Placement Committee offers. It gives you critical, but constructive and supportive feedback on a part of the job search process that is often one of the most harrowing for candidates.

b) Practice teaching.

Sometimes, as part of the application process, a department will require that a candidate teach a class while on a campus visit. Getting some teaching experience is invaluable preparation for this. (If you have already taught at an institution and have had positive peer and/or student evaluation reports, it is a good idea to include these in your dossier, to be sent out by the Student Affairs office as part of your file.)

What role does the APA play in helping me secure a job?

The APA has a Placement service that coordinates institutions that wish to fill vacancies and persons wishing to fill those vacancies. However, to take advantage of this service (described below) you must be a member of the APA and you must also register for the Eastern Division Meetings at which you wish to use the Placement service.

The way the APA Placement Service works is as follows:
You register for use of the Placement Service either in advance by mail, or once you have arrived at the Eastern Division Annual Meetings. If you want to register by mail you will find the application form included in the APA Proceedings that contains material relevant to the Meetings. Once you have sent in your registration, you will be issued a Placement number (that will be on the back of the name-tag that you are issued at the meetings). If you do not register in advance, then upon your arrival at the Meetings, go to the Placement Desk-where you can find information about and instruction for using the APA Placement Service. You can register at the Desk and receive a Placement number. (Since you must be a member of the APA in order to use their Placement Service, APA membership applications are usually available here as well as at the Registration Desk). Your Placement # functions as an "address": Each person registering for Placement has a file folder with his or her number on it. That folder will contain information regarding where you can be reached during the Meetings (on a form that you will be given), as well as "Request for Interview" forms. (Usually about 10 "Request for Interview" forms are in each folder. You can obtain more at the Placement Desk.) Fill out a 'Request for Interview' form for each institution that you would like to be interviewed by, attach a copy of your CV to the form, and deposit it in the designated place (usually a box marked "Request for Interviews" in the Job Candidate's area. (Note that some institutions do not accept 'on site' arrangements and only interview candidates with whom they have made prior arrangements. Some agree to accept CV's but not interviews requests. A list of institutions that are using the Placement Service will appear on a bulletin board along indicating whether the institution is accepting on-site requests for interviews.)

Each institution looking to fill a position will review the requests forwarded to it and respond either positively or negatively to your request for an interview. That response will be placed in your folder. It is therefore important for you to check your folder frequently to make sure that you receive invitations for interviews promptly.

Interviews may be conducted in any one of a number of places: at tables assigned to institutions that register for this purpose-a list will be made available of the tables that have been assigned to interviewing institutions); hotel rooms; or elsewhere. Please note that interviews may be scheduled during hours that the Placement Desk is closed.

Make sure that you bring multiple copies of your CV to the Meetings in case you have the opportunity to have an unanticipated interview.

If you have a problem or a complaint concerning the Placement Service you can make an appointment with the Placement Ombudsperson. He or she can be contacted through the Placement Desk.

Will the department have a representative at the convention?

The department generally does have several of its faculty at the convention, and we generally have a table at which faculty and students can gather in the evenings. You can find out the number of the table assigned to us by asking one of the APA staff for a list of the numbered tables and the institutions assigned to them. (This is a good way to look up friends at other institutions, too.)

Psychology

What are the pre-requisites for applying to the program?

We require fifteen credits in psychology (typically satisfied with five classes of three credits each). These 15 credits must include at least 1 semester of Statistics and 1 semester of (laboratory) Experimental Psychology. In addition, both the general and the Psychology GRE are required. There are many students in our program who have undergraduate degrees in subjects other than psychology, so that in itself is not a problem; in fact, we like to see a diversity of backgrounds. However, all applicants must take at least 15 undergraduate credits in psychology.

What do you mean by Experimental Psychology?

One of the things we look for in a potential applicant is some kind of experience with research, either through working on a research project (e.g., at a hospital) or through a course that focuses on research "methods"--that is, a course that includes data collection and/or analysis, and in which you learn about research design. Sometimes these courses are called "Research Methods" or some equivalent, rather than "Experimental". The admissions committee looks carefully at each application and at your specific coursework and research experience when evaluating your application.

What does my GRE score/GPA have to be to get in?

There are no official minimum scores or GPAs. The most accurate information we can give is that most students have GRE scores above 650 on each section and high GPAs (over 3.2), but there are always exceptions.

Some GRE specifics:

GRE scores are good for five years. Please make sure you take the GRE so that the scores arrive by the December 1st deadline. Do not send GRE scores directly to the clinical program. YOUR GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION SCORES MUST BE SENT TO THE GRADUATE CENTER, 365 FIFTH AVENUE, and NOT to The City College. The ETS Code number for The Graduate Center (CUNY) is 2113. The TOEFL number is the same.

Do I have to take the psychology GRE?

Yes, the psychology GRE is required. We ask that you take the November exam so that scores will be processed before the December 1st deadline. Though scores from the November subject test will not be available until mid-December, we will accept those scores so long as we receive all other materials by the December 1st deadline.

How long does it take to get through the program?

Approximately three to four years of required courses for a total of 90 credits; plus the first and second doctoral examinations, a dissertation and a year of internship.

Can I transfer credits?

The only credits that are transferable to our PhD program are graduate-level classes (either Master's or PhD-level). The maximum number of graduate credits that you can transfer in is 15; transfer credits are always at the discretion of the Program Director. With the exception of a statistics course, accepted transfer credits do not substitute for the required courses in the Program.

If I was not accepted last year and I want to apply again, what do I do?

The Graduate Center holds onto all applications for two years. They will resend all of your previous application materials to us when you fill out another application and pay another fee. In other words, you will not need to contact recommenders again, resend GRE scores or send new transcripts unless you choose to do so. We do suggest sending along a new personal statement to tell us anything new since the last time you applied. Please address any questions regarding your application to the Graduate Center admissions at admissions@gc.cuny.edu.

Can I attend the Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology part-time?

No, this is a full-time program. Classes are usually held on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays all day. Many students continue to work part-time throughout the program despite this schedule.

Can I take classes as a non-matriculated student?

You may not take courses within the Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology as a non-matriculated student. If there are specific courses in other areas of psychology that are of interest, please contact those programs or the admissions office at the Graduate Center.

What do I do about financial aid?

We make every effort to provide some form of financial support to every student who needs it, and all applicants are automatically considered for financial aid. But the availability of financial aid may depend on circumstances beyond our control, and so we cannot guarantee it without exception.

Applicants need to wait until they have been accepted to the Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology in order to apply for specific teaching or research positions, which may provide additional sources of income. (Also, just so you know, it is generally not possible for students to begin teaching until their second year in the program.) If you do earn admission to CUNY's program, we will inform you of any paperwork necessary in order to apply for these positions. For more information, please click here.

I am an International Student, who can I talk to about my application?

The program welcomes applications from international students. If you have a question regarding the admissions process you should contact the Graduate Center admissions office at admissions@gc.cuny.edu. If you have questions regarding specifics about what life will be like if you are admitted to the program you should contact the Office of International Students at the Graduate Center: intstugc@gc.cuny.edu.

In addition, we have a number of international students presently in our program who have volunteered to consult with applicants from their countries. They have direct experience with the questions and ambiguities that may arise in both directions and are happy to assist you in clarifying the nature of our own requirements and clarifying for the admissions committee the nature of your own experience and credentials. If you would like to check if there is a student in our program from your country, you may send an email to clinicalphdinfo@ccny.cuny.edu with the subject line 'International Student' and someone will get back to you at his or her earliest convenience.

Who should I have write my letters of recommendation?

We require at least two letters of recommendation. We have no "requirements" as far as who writes your recommendation letters; in general it's a good idea to include at least one from a professor (to vouch for your academic work and ability) and an employer or supervisor-someone who can speak to your research and clinical work and ability. It is important to ask people who can speak of you with real knowledge of your abilities and personal qualities (rather than "he/she was one of 200 undergraduates in my lecture course. He/she did very well with a grade of A in the course...) You can include more than two letters.

What research opportunities are available?

Students in the program have a variety of opportunities both on and off campus to participate in research. Some students participate actively in research projects conducted by individual faculty members. Others take advantage of the wealth of opportunities that are available in New York. In recent years, for example, students have worked in research projects at The New York State Psychiatric Institute, Cornell, Mount Sinai, NYU, and Beth Israel Hospital. The program has recently begun a psychotherapy research project based on data deriving from our clinic, The Psychological Center. It is anticipated that a number of students will eventually do their dissertations utilizing this data, and we encourage students to actively participate in shaping the data collection and research questions that will evolve from this project.

Should students contact an individual faculty member to inquire about working with him or her?

Once students are admitted, they have the opportunity to explore the research and scholarly activities of as many faculty members as they like and can choose to work with faculty members whose interests match theirs. It is important to understand that applicants are applying to the program, not to work with a specific person. In many programs, students are admitted specifically to work with a particular faculty member, and that faculty member virtually chooses the student on his or her own. Our admissions process is very different. All applicants are considered by the entire admissions committee and are compared to all other applicants to provide us with a strong and diverse incoming class.

What is the theoretical orientation of the program?

The orientation of the program is broadly defined as following the scholar-practitioner model. In line with this, our training is aimed at developing clinical psychologists whose experience as practitioners inform their scholarship and whose scholarship, in turn, informs their practice. That is, we aim to train critical thinkers who are, on the one hand, fully equipped to evaluate and examine their clinical work from the point of view of current theory and science, and, on the other, evaluate and examine the basic assumptions of theory and science in light of their experience working with patients. A second core assumption of the scholar practitioner model is that grounding in the theory, science, and practice of psychology will lead, ultimately, to advances in all of these areas. We are committed to training thoughtful, serious scholars, clinicians, researchers, and teachers. The orientation of the program is psychodynamic; however, other integrative, cognitive-behavioral approaches, including family systems and neuropsychology are well-represented. The program has a strong commitment to diversity and interdisciplinary work is highly valued. The program runs its own clinic, and clinical work is central to the training that students receive. It is important for applicants to be interested in scholarship and research as well as clinical work. First year students begin their clinical training via intake evaluations; students typically begin seeing patients in psychotherapy at the end of their first year or the beginning of their second year.

Can I come in and talk to you in person or take a tour?

There are two open houses each year, a fall open house and an open house sponsored by the Association for Ethnic and Minority Issues (AEMI), when it is possible to visit the school and program. Unfortunately, those open houses have already passed. Regrettably, we have too many applicants to be able to meet with students individually before the interview process.

Can I apply to more than one training area in the doctoral program in psychology program at CUNY in the same year?

The application for admissions to the doctoral program in Psychology will ask you to select your primary training area of interest. For our program, you should select the Clinical Psychology @ City College training area. You may also then select a secondary area of interest and identify a number of faculty members whose work you are interested in, but you are not required to do so.

I have more questions -- who can I talk to?

Please contact the admissions coordinator, Jennifer Wallach, at clinicalphdinfo@ccny.cuny.edu (if you are unable to use email you can call 212-650-5667) for questions related to the Clinical Psychology doctoral program. For questions about the admissions process please email admissions@gc.cuny.edu.

Women's and Gender Studies MA

Is the MA Program in Women’s and Gender Studies different from the Women’s Studies Certificate Program?

Yes. The Women’s Studies Certificate Program is available only to students enrolled in PhD programs at the Graduate Center.

As a Master’s student, can I participate in a Certificate Program?

No. The Certificate Programs are for PhD Students only.

Can I transfer from MALS to the MA Program?

The Master in Liberal Studies (MALS) and the MA in Women’s and Gender Studies are two separate programs with different admissions processes and requirements.

Can I transfer from the MA Program to MALS?

The MA Program in Women’s and Gender Studies and the MA in Liberal Studies (MALS) are two different programs with different application processes and requirements.

What courses will I be able to enroll in?

The MA in Women’s and Gender Studies requires 30 credits, including 12 credits in the core curriculum (4 core courses), 15 elective credits (5 elective courses), and 3 credits of thesis writing or internship. The core curriculum consists of four 3-credit courses: Feminist Texts and Theories, Global Feminisms, Topics in Women’s and Gender Studies, and a Research Seminar in Theory and Methodology. The elective courses can be taken in any Women’s and Gender Studies related course currently offered at the Graduate Center. Students will choose one of five tracks (Health, Science and Technology; Politics and Policy; Transnational Feminism; Social Cultural, and Literary Analysis; and LGBTQ studies) by taking at least three courses related to the track. The elective courses will change every term, and incorporate a diverse selection of material and instructors. For a sample of the courses previously offered, see the Women’s and Gender Studies Certificate Program Course Listings. If a student is interested in taking a course not listed through the MA Program, they must consult with the Women’s and Gender Studies Director. See requirements for more information.

What are the requirements beyond coursework?

All students are required to complete either a thesis of approximately 50 pages or an internship. Students will be supervised by faculty in the program who will serve as their thesis advisers, and by the director of the MA program. See requirements for more information.

For my internship or thesis, which faculty member will I be able to work with?

The MA Program in Women’s and Gender Studies offers students the possibility of studying with a large array of well-established scholars in the CUNY system. It is expected that students will choose a faculty member who is familiar with their work to supervise the internship or thesis, in consultation with the MA Program Director. See here for a full listing of current Women’s and Gender Studies faculty at CUNY.

When is the application due?

The deadline for completed applications is April 15. For more information or to apply, see the Admissions page.

How long will it take me to finish the MA?

Someone attending full-time could complete the degree in 1.5 years.  Part-time students will have up to 4 years to complete the degree.

Upon completing the MA Program, can I continue on to a PhD Program?

There is not a PhD Program in Women’s and Gender Studies at CUNY. However, students may seek to apply their MA credits to a PhD program at CUNY or another institution.

How much is the application fee?

The application fee is the same for any program at the Graduate Center. See the Admissions page for the most up to date terms and fees.

Can I waive the application fee?

The application fee is only waived for United States Armed Services Veterans, MacNair Scholars, and to any student who has graduated from a CUNY college with a bachelor or master’s degree or who will have graduated from one before starting at the Graduate Center. See the Admissions page for more information.

What should I do if I have questions regarding the application process?

Questions regarding the Admissions process should be directed to the Admissions office. Questions regarding the MA Program may be directed to the Director.

If I am not coming directly out of undergraduate studies, can I still apply?

Yes. The MA Program in Women’s and Gender welcomes students who have recently completed their Bachelor’s degree as well as students who are coming from a professional background.

I am an international student; can I still apply?

Yes. We encourage international students to apply. For more information on applying to CUNY as an international student, see Prospective Students: International Students.

If I am not coming directly out of undergraduate studies, whom should I request recommendation letters from?

Your two recommendations letters may be written by anyone in a professional supervising position who can speak to your work. See the application instructions for further information.

If I am not coming directly out of undergraduate studies, what can I submit for a writing sample?

The writing sample of 10-15 pages should be in an essay format and should demonstrate your ability to express ideas clearly and effectively.  It does not have to come from a class assignment; for example, it could be a policy document or a literary essay.

If I am an international student, can I submit my writing sample in any language other than English?

No. Because almost all of the course work and the thesis or internship will be conducted in English only, it is expected that students applying be proficient in English. Your writing sample and all other application documents must be submitted in English. International students are also required to submit TOEFL test scores or other verification of their ability to communicate in English. For more information, see Prospective Students: International Students: English Language Requirements.

Will I be able to transfer credits from another program?

Generally, all MA students must complete the required courses at the Graduate Center. However, exceptions may be made on a case-by-case basis. Students interested in transferring credits must consult with the Women’s and Gender Studies Director.

Is there a PhD Program in Women’s and Gender Studies?

No. At this time, there is not a PhD Program in Women’s and Gender Studies at CUNY. However, other institutions do offer a comparable PhD Program. See our Resources page for a list of other Women’s and Gender Studies Programs.

Are there other Master’s programs in Women’s and Gender studies in the region?

The MA Program in Women’s and Gender Studies at the Graduate Center is the first of its kind in the New York metropolitan area. However, there are other MA and PhD programs in New York state and the Northeast region, as well as across the country. See our Resources page for a list of other Women’s and Gender Studies Programs.

Will I be able to enroll in courses at the consortium schools, including NYU and Columbia?

No. The Inter-University Doctoral Consortium (IUDC) is open to doctoral students from participating schools who have completed at least one year of full-time study (or equivalent) toward the Ph.D. Please be advised that Terminal Masters students are not eligible.