Inside the Graduate Center: A Dissertation Showcase

MAY 07, 2018 | 6:30 PM

Details

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

WHEN:

May 07, 2018: 6:30 PM

ADMISSION:

Free; Reservations Required

SPONSOR:

Public Programs

RESERVATIONS:

Description

It takes the average Graduate Center doctoral student several years and 60,000 words to produce a dissertation. In this new showcase event, we give a select group of doctoral candidates just three minutes each to share the impact and importance of their Ph.D. dissertations. Come sample the intellectual life of the GC, as our diverse and talented students share their work. Topics include the medicinal properties of snail venom, the 1960s Tuskegee student revolt, how to improve computer speech-recognition, feminist perspectives on art and architecture in the context of #MeToo, and many others across a wide range of disciplines. 

THIS EVENT WILL BE LIVE-STREAMED

PARTICIPATING STUDENTS AND THEIR DISSERTATIONS:
 
Jeffrey Binder (English)
“Symbols Purely Mechanical: Language, Modernity, and the Rise of the Algorithm, 1605-1862”
 
Joy Borrero (Nursing)
“Nursing Students at the Helm: A Study of the Effect of a Health Literacy Module (HELM) on the Health Literacy Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes of Pre-Licensure Baccalaureate Nursing Students”
 
Miguel Briones (Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience)
“The Effects of Curcumin on the Consolidation, Reconsolidation, and Extinction of a Pavlovian Threat Memory”
 
Jagadisa-devasri Dacus (Social Welfare)
“Strengths and Resiliencies of Black MSM in New York City Who Maintain HIV-Seronegativity”
 
Chloe Edmonson (Theatre)
“Under the Influence: Drinking and Immersion in New York City Theatre and Popular Entertainment, 1850 to Present”
 
Emily Goldsmith (Business - Marketing)
“Do You Feel Like a Fraud? How Experiencing the Impostor Phenomenon Influences Consumption Choices”
 
Juliette Gorson (Biology - Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Behavior)
“Connecting Venom Gene Expression, Function, and Species Diversity in Predatory Marine Snails of the Terebridae”
 
Brian Jones (Urban Education)
“The Tuskegee Revolt: Student Activism, Black Power, and the Legacy of Booker T. Washington”
 
Chet Jordan (Urban Education)
“Exploring Shifting Moments of Remediation: An Analysis of the Policies of Developmental Education in The City University of New York”
 
Eric Knudsen (Psychology)
“Broad Skill Focused Job Seeking: A Study of Intervention and Employment Outcomes”
 
Ji Yeon Lee (Music)
“Climax Structure in Late Romantic Opera”
 
Min Ma (Computer Science)
“Adaptation and Augmentation: Towards Better Rescoring Strategies for Automatic Speech Recognition and Spoken Term Detection”
 
Brett Millar (Psychology)

“The Under-Explored Role of Tiredness in Alcohol Use and Sexual Risk-Taking Among Gay and Bisexual Men”
 
Diana Moore (History)
“Transnational Nationalists: Cosmopolitan Women, Philanthropy, and Italian State-Building, 1850-1890”
 
David Rasmussen (Political Science)
“The Politics of United States Army Doctrine”
 
Rebecca Siefert (Art History)

“Lauretta Vinciarelli in Context: Transatlantic Dialogues in Architecture, Art, Pedagogy, and Theory, 1968-2007"