Anwar Shaikh Presents: Income Inequality and Econophysics

OCT 11, 2018 | 4:30 PM TO 6:30 PM

Details

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:

5318

WHEN:

October 11, 2018: 4:30 PM-6:30 PM

CONTACT INFO:

ADMISSION:

Free

SPONSOR:

Advanced Research Collaborative (ARC)

Description

ARC Fellow, Anwar Shaikh, Presents: "Income Inequality and Econophysics: Empirical Evidence and Classical Foundations"

Professor of Economics at the Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science of the New School University, Associate Editor of the Cambridge Journal of Economics, from 2000-2005 Senior Scholar and member of the Macro Modeling Team at the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College. His most recent book is Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises from Oxford University Press 2016, his intellectual biography is included in the book Eminent Economists II from Cambridge University Press 2014, and in 2013 he was awarded the Social Science Prize of the NordSud International Prize for Literature and Science of the Fondazione Pescarabruzzo in Italy for his paper on George Soros’ notion of reflexivity entitled "Reflexivity, Path-Dependence and Disequilibrium Dynamics" in the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Fall 2010. He was the recipient of two successive grants from the Initiative for New Economic Thinking (INET) in 2011-2012. A prior book was Globalization and the Myths of Free Trade (2007, Routledge). He has written on international trade, finance theory, political economy, macroeconomic policy, the welfare state, growth theory, inflation theory, crisis theory, national and global inequality, and past and current global economic crises. Some recent articles are "Income Distribution, Econophysics and Piketty", Review of Political Economy, 2016, 18-29 July; "Race, gender and the econophysics of income distribution in the USA", with Nikolaos Papanikolaou and Noe  Wiener, Physica A 415 (2014) 54–60; "On the role of reflexivity in economic analysis", Journal of Economic Methodology (2014), 439-445; and "The First Great Depression of the 21st Century", Socialist Register, (2011), Fall.