The Enigma of Clarence Thomas: A Conversation (Corey Robin, Kendall Thomas)

DEC 04, 2019 | 6:30 PM TO 8:00 PM

Details

WHERE:

The Graduate Center
365 Fifth Avenue

ROOM:

9100: Skylight Room

WHEN:

December 04, 2019: 6:30 PM-8:00 PM

ADMISSION:

Free

SPONSOR:

Dean for Master's Programs, the Program in Political Science, and the M.A. Program in Biography and Memoir

Description

Join us for The Enigma of Clarence Thomas: A Conversation between Corey Robin, the author of The Enigma of Clarence Thomas (Metropolitan Books, 2019) and Professor of Political Science at Brooklyn College and The Graduate Center, CUNY, and Kendall Thomas, Nash Professor of Law at Columbia Law School, on December 4, 2019 at 6:30PM in the Kelly Skylight Room of The Graduate Center, CUNY.

In The Enigma of Clarence Thomas, the first examination of its kind, Corey Robin delves deeply into both Thomas’s biography and his jurisprudence, masterfully reading his Supreme Court opinions against the backdrop of his autobiographical and political writings and speeches. The hidden source of Thomas’s conservative views, Robin shows, is a profound skepticism that racism can be overcome. Thomas is convinced that any government action on behalf of African-Americans will be tainted by racism; the most African-Americans can hope for is that white people will get out of their way.

Corey Robin is the author of The Reactionary Mind: Conservatism from Edmund Burke to Donald Trump and Fear: The History of a Political Idea. He teaches political science at Brooklyn College and The Graduate Center, CUNY. Robin’s writing has appeared in the New York Times, the New Yorker, Harper’s, and the London Review of Books, among other publications, and has been translated into thirteen languages. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Kendall Thomas is the Nash Professor of Law and co-founder and director of the Center for the Study of Law and Culture at Columbia Law School. His teaching and research interests include U.S. and comparative constitutional law, human rights, legal philosophy, feminist legal theory, critical race theory, and law and sexuality. His writings have appeared in several academic journals and volumes of collected essays. Thomas is a co-editor of Critical Race Theory: The Key Writings that Founded the Movement, The New Press, 1996, and What's Left of Theory?, Routledge Press, 2000.

The event is sponsored by the Office of the Dean for Master's Programs, the M.A. Program in Political Science, and the M.A. Program in Biography and Memoir at The Graduate Center, CUNY.