Jeffrey S. Lowe: "First Generation African American Planners and the City"

OCT 29, 2020 | 4:00 PM TO 5:30 PM

Details

WHERE:

Online

WHEN:

October 29, 2020: 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

ADMISSION:

Free

SPONSOR:

Advanced Research Collaborative (ARC)

RESERVATIONS:

Description

Planning emerged as a progressive era profession in the first decade of the 20th century.  However, it was decades later before the first African American earned the professional degree in the discipline.  This presentation illuminates upon the efforts of early African American planners and their quest for city building, racial inclusion in the planning movement, and lessons about the potential of future development and revitalization. 

Jeffrey S. Lowe is an Associate Professor of Urban Planning and Environmental Policy at Texas Southern University.  His service to the planning profession includes past chair of the Planning and the Black Community Division of the American Planning Association, founding member and past co-chair of the Planners of Color Interest Group (POCIG) of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP), and immediate-past chair of ACSP’s Committee on Diversity.  He is a board member of the Great Plans Restoration Council, and a research fellow at the Kinder Institute for Urban Research (Rice University).  His research focuses on social justice and racial equity concerns within the context of community planning and urban revitalization.  He is the author of Rebuilding Communities the Public Trust Way: Community Foundation Assistance to CDCs, 1980-2000 (Lexington Press, 2006) and other publications including articles in Planning, Practice and Research; Housing Policy Debate; Journal of Urban Affairs; Urban Geography; and Western Journal of Black Studies.  Relatively recently he has researched community land trusts as a transformational tool to help bring about greater levels of permanent affordable housing, social control of land, and racial equity.  During his ARC visit (Fall 2020 term), he will expand his research to urban revitalization and racial diversification of the U.S. planning profession.