Mark Harris on Mike Nichols, with Robert Edwards

APR 13, 2021 | 6:00 PM TO 7:15 PM

Details

WHERE:

Online Event

WHEN:

April 13, 2021: 6:00 PM-7:15 PM

ADMISSION:

Free

SPONSOR:

Leon Levy Center for Biography

RESERVATIONS:

Description

Mike Nichols burst onto the scene as a wunderkind: while still in his twenties, he was half of a hit improv duo with Elaine May that was the talk of the country. Next he directed four consecutive hit plays, won back-to-back Tonys, ushered in a new era of Hollywood moviemaking with Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, and followed it with The Graduate, which won him an Oscar and became the third-highest-grossing movie ever.

Where he arrived is even more astonishing given where he had begun: born Igor Peschkowsky to a Jewish couple in Berlin in 1931, he was sent along with his younger brother to America on a ship in 1939. The young immigrant boy caught very few breaks. He was bullied and ostracized--an allergic reaction had rendered him permanently hairless--and his father died when he was just twelve, leaving his mother alone and overwhelmed.

The gulf between these two sets of facts explains a great deal about Nichols's transformation from lonely outsider to the center of more than one cultural universe--the acute powers of observation that first made him famous; the nourishment he drew from his creative partnerships, most enduringly with May; his unquenchable drive; his hunger for security and status; and the depressions and self-medications that brought him to terrible lows.

Mark Harris gives an intimate and evenhanded accounting of success and failure alike; the portrait is not always flattering, but its ultimate impact is to present the full story of one of the most richly interesting, complicated, and consequential figures the worlds of theater and motion pictures have ever seen. It is a triumph of the biographer's art.

Mark Harris is the author of Pictures at a Revolution: Five Movies and the Birth of the New Hollywood, which was a New York Times notable book of the year, and Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War. He is currently a writer for New York, where he often covers the intersection of culture and politics. A graduate of Yale University, Harris lives in New York City with his husband, Tony Kushner.

Robert Edwards is a writer and filmmaker based in New York City. His first script, Land of the Blind, won a Nicholl Fellowship from the Academy in 2001 and became his directorial debut, starring Ralph Fiennes and Donald Sutherland. His most recent documentary (with partner Ferne Pearlstein) was The Last Laugh (2016), featuring Mel Brooks and Sarah Silverman. His blog on politics and culture, The King’s Necktie, appears weekly.