Advanced Research Collaborative  

DISTINGUISHED CUNY FELLOWS


Below are profiles of the 2017-2018 Distinguished CUNY Fellows:

Ray Allen
Ray Allen
is Professor of Music at Brooklyn College and the CUNY Graduate Center. In addition, he directs the American Studies Program and serves as a senior associate at the Hitchcock Institute for Studies in American Music at Brooklyn College. He teaches courses on American folk, popular, and concert music, and American cultural studies. Allen is the author of Gone to the Country: The New Lost City Ramblers and the Urban Folk Music Revival (University of Illinois Press, 2010) and Singing in the Spirit: African-American Sacred Quartets in New York City (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1991). He has co-edited the volume Island Sounds in the Global City: Caribbean Popular Music and Identity in New York (University of Illinois Press, 1998) with Lois Wilcken. His latest book project, Jump Up! Caribbean Carnival Music in New York, is scheduled to be  published by Oxford University Press in 2018.


Sharon Avni
Sharon Avni
is Associate Professor in the Department of Academic Literacy and Linguistics at Borough of Manhattan Community College, where she joined in 2009. An applied linguist, her scholarly work investigates how Hebrew, in its discursive, textual, and material forms, is a constitutive element of American Jewish social and religious identity. Currently, she is co-authoring a book (to be published by Rutgers University Press in 2018) examining Hebrew language ideologies and practices at Jewish residential camps in the United States. She is the co-PI on a Spencer Foundation-funded project examining the expansion of a Hebrew-English dual language bilingual education program at a public middle school in NYC.  She received her PhD from New York University in 2009.

Elissa Bemporad
Elissa Bemporad
is the Jerry and William Ungar Associate Professor of East European Jewish History and the Holocaust at Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center. She is the author of Becoming Soviet Jews: The Bolshevik Experiment in Minsk (Indiana University Press, 2013), winner of the National Jewish Book Award and of the Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary History. The Russian edition was recently published with ROSSPEN, in the History of Stalinism Series. She is currently finishing a book entitled Legacy of Blood: Jews, Pogroms, and Ritual Murder in the Lands of the Soviets, which will be published with Oxford University Press. Elissa is the co-editor of Women and Genocide: Survivors and Perpetrators (forthcoming with Indiana University Press in 2018), a collection of studies on the multifaceted roles played by women in different genocidal contexts during the twentieth century. She has recently been a recipient of an NEH Fellowship and a Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington DC. Elissa's projects in progress include research for a biography of Ester Frumkin, the most prominent Jewish female political activist and public figure in late Imperial Russia and in the early Soviet Union.

Cecelia Cutler
Cecelia Cutler
works on language and identity, particularly among young people in the U.S. who affiliate with hip-hop culture. Some of her current work explores multilingualism and alignment in computer mediated communication among Mexican-American youth and language attitudes towards Scottish English on YouTube. She is also working on a three-year collaborative NSF-funded project on variation and change in New York City English with Christina Tortora, Michael Newman, and Bill Haddican.

Els de Graauw
Els de Graauw
is Associate Professor of Political Science at Baruch College, CUNY, where she also teaches in the Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs.  Her research centers on the nexus of immigration and citizenship, civil society organizations, urban and regional politics, and public policy, with a focus on building institutional capacity for immigrant integration and representation.  Her award-winning book Making Immigrant Rights Real: Nonprofits and the Politics of Integration in San Francisco (Cornell University Press, 2016) analyzes the role of nonprofit organizations in advocating for immigrant integration policies in San Francisco, with a focus on immigrant language access, labor rights, and municipal ID cards.  Currently, she is working on her second book, a comparative study of city and state immigrant affairs offices in the United States, with a focus on New York City, Atlanta, Houston, San Francisco, and Detroit.  She also has under way collaborative research on the implementation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in three large U.S. metro regions.  Els earned her Ph.D. degree in Political Science from the University of California at Berkeley, and she has been a researcher at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and Cornell University.  She co-founded the Section on Migration and Citizenship of the American Political Science Association in 2012, and she served as the Section’s elected co-president and secretary for four years.  She serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies and the Urban Affairs Review.

Tatyana Kleyn
Tatyana Kleyn
is associate professor and director of the Bilingual Education and TESOL programs at the City College of New York. She has an Ed.D. in international educational development at Teachers College, Columbia University.  She received the early career award for the Bilingual Research SIG for the American Educational Research Association.  For 2014-15 Tatyana served as president of the New York State Association for Bilingual Education and a Fulbright Scholar in Oaxaca, Mexico.  Tatyana is author of “Immigration: The Ultimate Teen Guide,” co-author of “Teaching in Two Languages: A Guide for K-12 Bilingual Educators” (with Reyes) and co-editor of “Translanguaging with Multilingual Learners: Learning from Classroom Moments” (with García).  She is the director and co-producer of the documentaries “Living Undocumented: High School, College and Beyond” and “Una Vida, Dos Países [One Life, Two Countries]: Children and Youth (Back) in Mexico.”  She was an elementary school teacher in San Pedro Sula, Honduras and Atlanta, Georgia.  ​

Sanders Korenman
Sanders Korenman
is Professor in the Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, Baruch College, CUNY, the CUNY Institute for Demographic Research and the CUNY Graduate Center. He served as Senior Economist for labor, welfare, and education for President Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisers and was a member of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Academy of Sciences. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. With support from the Russell Sage Foundation and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation he and Dahlia Remler have developed a poverty measure that includes a basic need for health care and incorporates health insurance benefits. They are using this measure to assess the impact of health insurance benefits on poverty, particularly under the Affordable Care Act. Korenman and Remler’s paper on the impact of the Massachusetts health reforms on poverty appeared in the December 2016 Journal of Health Economics.  His prior positions include Associate Professor in the Humphrey Institute, University of Minnesota and Assistant Professor of Economics and Public Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University. He teaches courses in poverty and social policy, the economic analysis of public policy, and research methods.

Kate Menken
Kate Menken
is a Professor of Linguistics at Queens College of the City University of New York (CUNY), and a Research Fellow at the Research Institute for the Study of Language in Urban Society at the CUNY Graduate Center. She is Co-Principal Investigator of the CUNY-New York State Initiative for Emergent Bilinguals (NYSIEB) project (www.cuny-nysieb.org). She holds an Ed.D. from Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research interests include language education policy, bilingual education, and emergent bilinguals in secondary schools. Books she has authored or edited are: English Learners Left Behind: Standardized Testing as Language Policy (Multilingual Matters, 2008), Negotiating Language Policies in Schools: Educators as Policymakers (co-edited with Ofelia García, Routledge, 2010), and Common Core, Bilingual and English Language Learners: A Resource for Educators (co-edited with Guadalupe Valdés and Mariana Castro, Caslon, 2015). Further information can be found on her website: http://katemenken.org

Cathy Mulder
Cathy Mulder
is an associate professor of Economics at John Jay College-CUNY. She earned her Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst (2006), her MA from Temple University in Philadelphia (1994), and her BA from Stockton College in Pomona, NJ (1992) all in Economics. Cathy specializes in economic justice, labor studies/economics, and gender issues. However, she takes an interdisciplinary approach in both her scholarly research and her teaching, uniting not only her specialties, but also concerns about the environment, politics, history, and is currently researching alternative business organizations internationally among other specialties. Cathy has over 35 years of worker activism, having been employed by the telephone company as a blue-collar worker in a non-traditional position where she was very active in her union, the IBEW, Local 827. She was also a member and official in the UAW while a graduate student at UMass, and she worked as a business agent for the NY musicians’ union, AFM Local 802 for two years. She is currently an active member of the Professional Staff Congress-CUNY (PSC-CUNY) where she served as a delegate in 1010/11. Her scholarly work is representative of her life experiences and include two single authored books, Unions and Class Transformation: The Case of the Broadway Musicians and Transcending Capitalism Through Cooperative Practice which consists of six case studies of alternative business structures ranging from the Green Bay Packers, to the London Symphony Orchestra, and a group of sex workers. Most recently she co-edited the Handbook of Marxian Economics. She has authored a number of peer reviewed articles and is currently the president of the Association of Economic and Social Analysis (AESA) and is also is an executive board member of the Left Forum.

Michael Paris
Michael Paris
is Associate Professor of Political Science at the College of Staten Island (CUNY), where he teaches courses in constitutional law, civil liberties, and race and public policy. He is the author of Framing Equal Opportunity: Law and the Politics of School Finance Reform (Stanford University Press, 2010), which received an honorable mention for the 2011 C. Herman Pritchett Award, given annually by the American Political Science Association’s Law and Courts Section for the best book in the field published by a political scientist during the previous year. Paris’s other publications include “Racial Liberalism and School Desegregation Jurisprudence: Notes Toward a Usable Past,” in Anne R. Oakes, Ed., Controversies in Equal Protection (Ashgate Publishers, 2015), and “The Politics of Rights: Then and Now,” Law and Social Inquiry, Vol. 31, No. 4 (Fall 2006). He is currently working on a book about the history and future of school desegregation in the United States.

Andrea Parmegiani
Andrea Parmegiani
is Associate Professor in the English Department at Bronx Community College.  He received an M.A. in English (Creative Writing) from City College (City University of New York), an M.Ed. in Language and Literacy from the University of Cape Town, and a Ph.D. in English from the Graduate Center (City University of New York). His South African research explores the notion of language ownership as a construct for understanding how language shapes identity construction and power relations in multilingual societies where English is the dominant language. His findings show that in order to facilitate democratic transformation, the ownership of dominant languages should not be thought of as a native speaker’s prerogative, but rather as an asset that can be acquired as a result of an appropriation process within the framework of additive multilingualism. In the United States, Andrea Parmegiani’s research has zeroed-in on the pedagogical aspects of appropriating English as an additional language by looking for ways to use students’ mother tongue as a resource for academic literacy acquisition.  He is currently working on a book based on a program he started at Bronx Community College to promote college success among Latin@ students by linking Spanish and ESL academic literacy development courses.
 
Emily Raboteau
Emily Raboteau
 is a novelist, memoirist, essayist and professor of creative writing at the City College of New York. She is the author of two books; The Professor's Daughter (Henry Holt, 2005), and Searching for Zion: The Quest for Home in the African Diaspora, (Grove/Atlantic, 2013) winner of a 2014 American Book Award and a finalist for a Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. Her recent essay on the Know Your Rights! murals of New York City was included in the landmark NYT bestselling anthology, The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks About Race (Scribner, 2016). Other writing of hers about race, identity, social justice, and photography has appeared in The New York Times, The New Yorker, The Guardian, The Washington Post, VQR, Salon, Orion, Transition, and elsewhere.  Her next novel, Endurance, explores the intersecting lives and problems of the residents of a gentrifying Upper Manhattan apartment building, as seen through the eyes of the building's live-in superintendent.


Ida Susser
Ida Susser
is a Professor of Anthropology at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center and adjunct Professor of Socio-Medical Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University. She has conducted ethnographic research with respect to urban social movements and the urban commons in the United States and Europe as well as with respect to the gendered politics, local, national and global of the AIDS epidemic in New York City, Puerto Rico and southern Africa. Her book: Updated  Norman Street:Poverty and Politics  in an Urban Neighborhood (Oxford University Press) features a new section, Claiming a Right to New York City, which discusses the changing neighborhoods of Greenpoint and Williamsburg in Brooklyn from the original ethnography which began with the New York City fiscal crisis and the occupation of the People’s Firehouse in 1975 to the Occupy movement of 2011. Other recent books are AIDS, Sex and Culture: Global Politics and Survival in Southern Africa (Wiley-Blackwell) which was awarded the Eileen Basker Memorial Prize for research in women and health, by the Society for Medical Anthropology (2012) a co-edited book Rethinking America (Paradigm Press) and Medical Anthropology in the World System (co-authored)  Praeger  , (3rd edition). Her research has been funded by a MacArthur Foundation Research and Writing Fellowship, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Institute of Health and the National Science Foundation.

Moinca Varsanya
Monica Varsanyi
(Ph.D. Geography UCLA) is Professor of Political Science at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY, and Geography (Earth and Environmental Sciences) at the CUNY Graduate Center.  She is a scholar of migration, membership, and the state, with a specific focus on unauthorized immigration, state and local immigration politics, and immigration federalism in the United States.  She is author of numerous journal articles, and her books include Taking Local Control: Immigration Policy Activism in U.S. Cities and States (Stanford University Press, 2010, edited volume) and Policing Immigrants: Local Law Enforcement on the Front Lines (with Doris Marie Provine, Scott Decker, and Paul Lewis; University of Chicago Press, 2016).  Her current research project, with Marie Provine, traces the evolution of immigration policies and the tensions of immigration federalism as they have played out in New Mexico and Arizona from the Territorial Period to the present.  She is also working on a project that explores the contentious evolution of Hispanic identity in New Mexico during the Chicano Period (1963-1972).  Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and National Endowment for the Humanities.  She currently serves on the Research Advisory Board of the Vera Institute of Justice (New York City), and the editorial board of the Annals of the Association of American Geographers, the flagship journal in the discipline.  


Read about past Distinguished CUNY Fellows