Advanced Research Collaborative  

STUDENT FELLOWS


Below are short bios of the Fall 2017 and Spring 2018 ARC Research Praxis Award winners:

Miguel Acosta
Miguel Acosta
is a Ph.D. student in Economics at The Graduate Center, CUNY. His research is at the intersection between theoretical and applied macroeconomics, using dynamic general equilibrium models to address different macroeconomic issues in emerging markets. The main question he addresses are: Why haven’t some emerging markets being able to catch up, in terms of relative per capita income, with developed countries? What policies could be taken to revert this trend? The most recent findings of his work are that informality has an important role in holding back the level of a country’s economic development, therefore policies that tackle its determinants, such as fiscal policy and institutional improvement of law enforcement, are crucial in the reduction of informality and, therefore, the increase in aggregate productivity, which finally leads to a higher level of per capita income. His current projects are focused on determining the macroeconomic impact of crime in Colombia and Mexico, on explaining the causes and effects of early deindustrialization over Latin America’s development, and assessing the impact of international shocks over economic fluctuations in emerging markets.

Andrew Anastasi
Andrew Anastasi
is a Ph.D. student in Sociology at the Graduate Center. His dissertation research explores social movement activism and state and capital responses in the postwar United States. More specifically he studies New Left activist projects and the War on Poverty programs of the 1960s and 1970s in order to draw out the relationships between rebellions by waged and unwaged workers and students, the state's role in the regulation and reproduction of labor-power, and the rise in forms of and discourses around socially-meaningful work. In addition to his research at the Graduate Center, Andrew teaches social theory at Queens College. He is also a member of the Viewpoint Magazine editorial collective. He holds a B.A. in Film & Video Studies from Macalester College. 




Thomas Bane
Thomas Bane
is a Ph.D. student in Social Welfare at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. His research focuses on health systems strengthening and improving health equity across populations. For the past seven years, he has worked in public health insurance programs. He has previously worked in the areas of global public health and health policy. Thomas is also an adjunct lecturer at City Tech.  He has a Master's in Social Work and a Master's in Fine Arts in Poetry. 










Kelsey Chatlosh
Kelsey Chatlosh
is a Ph.D. student in cultural anthropology and Digital Fellow at The Graduate Center, CUNY. She holds a B.A. (2012) in anthropology and American studies, with a minor in Hispanic languages and literatures from The George Washington University. Her future dissertation research will examine how inequalities of race, gender and class motivate and structure women Afro-Chilean activists’ articulations of belonging to the Chilean nation and the African diaspora, in the context of a purportedly racially homogenous country. Her work as a Digital Fellow is focused on digital tools and platforms for qualitative research, oral interviews and sound data, with an emphasis on ethics and decolonizing and feminist methods. 




Rachel Chapman
Rachel Chapman
is a Ph.D. candidate in Urban Education at the Graduate Center and a Teaching Fellow in the Elementary and Early Childhood Education Program at Queens College. She holds a B.A. in Spanish and Sociology from the University of Toledo and a M.A. in Latin American Studies from the University of Arizona. Her dissertation research focuses on urban education reform policy's impact on literacy practices in early childhood education, specifically in schools designated as "failing," largely in low-income neighborhoods within Latino, African American & immigrant communities. As an ARC student fellow, Ms. Chapman will further develop her research on the impact of policy and poverty on literacy, child development and socialization, with a concentration on a case study located in Cleveland, Ohio.



Misty Crooks
Misty Crooks
is a Ph.D. student in linguistic anthropology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. She received a B.A. in anthropology from UNC Chapel Hill. Before beginning her studies at CUNY, she taught English as a Second Language and received an M.A. in Applied Linguistics at the University of Massachusetts Boston. This fostered her interest in the social life of language and discourses as well as issues of race and class. Her previous research analyzed cross examinations of witnesses and focused on the reproduction of dominant ideologies in court trials. She is currently developing a project to explore the political battles around democratic process in North Carolina. She is interested in voter suppression and transgender bathroom laws.

Claudia Crowie
Claudia Crowie
is a Ph.D. student in the cultural anthropology program at the CUNY Graduate Center, and a graduate teaching fellow at John Jay College. Her current research examines the ways that the privatization of urban governance in post-Apartheid Durban, South Africa constructs local race and class divisions, and shapes tensions between locals and African immigrants living in the inner city. She obtained a Bachelor of Laws degree from the University of Kwazulu-Natal in South Africa in 2008, and an M.A. in cultural anthropology from the University of Northern Arizona on a Fulbright Foreign Student grant in 2013.




Angela Crumdy
Angela Crumdy
is a doctoral student in the cultural anthropology and a MAGNET Fellow at The Graduate Center, CUNY.  She holds a B.A. (2012) in anthropology and Latin American & Caribbean Studies from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  Prior to entering The Graduate Center, she served as a high school English teacher.  Her research interests include gender, education and critical race theory.  Through an extended historical trajectory, her dissertation research examines black Cuban women educators' contributions to the Cuban education system and to more general nation building efforts beginning in the 20th century.  


Erin Cully
Erin Cully
 is a PhD student in the history department. She studies the political economy of the post-1980s turn to finance in the US. Her research has focused on the politics of the deregulation of deposit interest rates, the consolidating effects of the savings and loan crisis, and the formation of regional interstate compacts in the Southeast, using documents from Congress, the Carter, Reagan and Clinton libraries, as well as several US state archives. Together, these projects provide an analysis of the interplay between state and federal policymaking. She hopes to contribute to historicizing the ‘financialization’ of the US economy by tracing its historical roots. Erin earned a BA (2012) and an MA (2013) from McGill University, and is a recipient of a Doctoral Student Research Grant, a Provost’s Digital Innovation Grant, and a Provost’s Early Research Initiative Grant. 

Fadime
Fadime Demiralp
is a graduate student in Economics at the Graduate Center, City University of New York.  She holds M.Phil. in Mathematics. Currently, Fadime teaches at the Mathematics and Statistics Department of Hunter College and at the Economics Department of Brooklyn College, and works as a research assistant for the Economic Studies Group at the Graduate Center. Her research fields are financial economics, international macroeconomics, and monetary economics. Fadime believes that some core determinants of markets have to be redefined and adjusted due to advances in technology, especially in communication technology, if one concerns about increasing wage and income inequality. As ARC fellow, her research will not only  provide a concrete evidence for need of such upgrade  whose absence will effect productivity and inequality at the bottom of wage distribution but also provide a core base in terms of corresponding reforming in academic literature in economics.

Ola Galal
Ola Galal
is a PhD student in Cultural Anthropology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Her research focuses on marginalization and conceptions of citizenship rights and of democracy in Tunisia. She wrote her MA thesis on youth participation in the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. Previously, she worked as a journalist covering breaking news and economic and financial stories in North Africa and the Middle East for Bloomberg News.

Edwin Grimsley
Edwin Grimsley
 is a doctoral student in Sociology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He is primarily interested in using both quantitative and qualitative methods to study issues related to neighborhoods and the life outcomes of those who encounter arrests and convictions for misdemeanor offenses in the United States. He is currently working on several quantitative and qualitative projects related to Broken Windows policing and Stop, Question, and Frisk, and has worked in other research areas such as race and ethnicity, culture and immigration. He previously worked at the Innocence Project as a Senior Case Analyst, where he investigated cases of prisoners convicted of serious crimes, ultimately helping to free six innocent people from prison. Additionally, he worked on post-9/11 detentions for the ACLU Immigrants Rights Project. He holds a BA in Biology from Wesleyan University. He plans to use the ARC Research Praxis Fellowship to study the relationship between immigration deportations and NYPD policing practices in New York City, particularly examining the impact of arrests for minor offenses on immigration detentions and deportations. 

Bonnie Ip
Bonnie H. Ip 
is a doctoral student in Sociology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. She holds a BA in English Literature from Binghamton University, an MA in American Studies from City College of New York, and an MA in sociology from The New School for Social Research. She is also currently a Graduate Research Assistant at University of Connecticut working on a Russell Sage Foundation funded project called “Etiquette of Inequality” that looks at the influence of background racial, ethnic, immigrant, and economic inequality on social relations in egalitarian settings in NYC. Her scholarly interests revolve around issues of intergenerational immigrant assimilation experiences, urban immigrant neighborhoods, and ethnic group boundaries. As a mixed methods researcher, she plans to use the ARC Fellowship to study the way immigrant enclaves in NYC have shifted and changed spatially and functionally throughout time. Using archival materials, business directories, ACS Census data, and GIS mapping software, she plans to investigate how well theoretical definitions of immigrant enclaves from the literature map onto the empirical spatial reality of ethnic enclaves.

Gaurav Jashnani
Gaurav Jashnani
is a doctoral student in Critical Social/Personality Psychology. His current research explores perceptions of changing public and commercial space among Brooklyn residents within the context of intensive gentrification and ‘broken windows’ policing. This project builds upon his previous work on urban policing, which explores how trauma and other forms of institutionally generated distress serve to regulate and reconfigure policed communities’ relationships to public space, specifically within a context of rapid displacement and violent dispossession of poor and working-class people of color (i.e., gentrification). Additionally, Gaurav holds a Master of Education in Counseling Psychology from Columbia University. He is co-founder of the Challenging Male Supremacy Project (www.challengingmalesupremacy.org), and has been working on issues of trauma and intimate violence since 2006. He is originally from Queens, New York.

Martin Jensen
Martin Aagaard Jensen is a doctoral student in the Comparative Literature program at the Graduate Center. His research focuses on the cultural politics of media and technology, and in particular on how literary and cultural narratives make sense of changing technological realities in the Americas during the post-1945 period. In an age of globalization that often construes scientific and technological progress as the agent of history, his work focuses on how technology fails to transcend racial, gender, and social divisions and instead becomes a vehicle for the inequality it was assumed to overcome.






Philip Johnson
Philip Johnson
is a doctoral student in the Political Science program at the Graduate Center, and teaches at Hunter College. His research focuses on theories of violence, and on how and why systems of violence form and function. Recent work looks at detention facilities in the War on Terror, and the connections between state and criminal violence in Mexico. He is currently developing a project that examines the targeting of undocumented migrants and other marginalized groups by criminal organizations in Mexico.







Hayden Ju
Dae Shin (Hayden) Ju
is a doctoral student in the Sociology program at the Graduate Center, CUNY. Her research interests primarily lie within the areas of immigration, family and work, and quantitative methods with a focus on exploring the ways in which the immigration experience transforms gender ideologies and socially prescribed family roles. Her current project examines the changing pattern of migration among married Korean women and how different migration strategies lead to divergent paths in women's lived experience. She analyzes the American Community Survey to estimate the likelihood of labor force participation among married Korean American women. As an ARC student fellow, she hopes to develop a study that addresses both the structural dimensions of immigrant women’s work and family and the subjective meanings that are created during the family life course.

Jojo Karlin
Jojo Karlin
is a doctoral student in the English program at the Graduate Center and a GC Digital Initiatives Digital Fellow. Jojo’s research examines letters and letter writing before and after the rise of telecommunications. She looks at how letters act as elaborations or elongations of writers’ understanding of two separate time-spaces and how letters’ physical displacement operates on a notion of correspondence through asynchronous synchronicity or copresence. As a Pine Tree Fellow, she hopes to investigate the preservation of correspondence in a digital humanities context.
 





Mary Catherine Kinniburgh
Mary Catherine Kinniburgh
is a doctoral candidate in English at The Graduate Center, CUNY, whose research focuses on the intersections of book history, new media, and poetics. In particular, her work examines the simultaneous rise of reprographic technologies after World War II and renewed poetic interest in occult themes, including mysticism, alchemy, and poetics of dictation. She is invested in negotiating the methods of bibliography and book history from a digital perspective, and how this process may be informed by practices such as critical making, collaboration with archival institutions on special collections pedagogy, and media archaeology. Mary Catherine is also an editor for Lost and Found: The CUNY Poetics Document Initiative, and a two-time recipient of the Diane di Prima Fellowship for archival research. She created and coordinates the Collaborative Research Seminar, a working group for primary source research at the Center for the Humanities, and teaches workshops in digital skills and physical computing as a Digital Fellow and lead fellow for the GC Maker Space. She holds an M.A. in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University and a B.A. in English and Medieval Studies from University of Virginia as a Jefferson Scholar. She is currently an ARC Pine Tree Fellow.

Benjamin Macaulay
Benjamin Macaulay is a PhD candidate in Linguistics focusing on the documentation of critically endangered languages. His work questions notions of "speakerhood" in the context of language documentation, and how documentation can progress in situations where few to none "fully fluent" speakers exist. His current work is on the Austronesian languages of Taiwan, where extensive language contact with dominant languages has left a number of situations where a language's "last speakers" have language patterns that deviate considerably from earlier descriptions.






Christopher Maggio
is a doctoral student in Sociology at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He is primarily interested in using quantitative methods to study issues related to contemporary immigration in the United States. His past and current research largely relates to policies at the state and local level impacting immigrants and ethnic minorities in the U.S., studying outcomes including social/civic engagement and mental health. He is also currently working on several quantitative projects with faculty at the Graduate Center related to early indicators of college success and affordable housing, and has worked in other research areas such as gender and sexuality and public health. He holds a BA in Economics and an MA in Applied Quantitative Research, both from NYU. He plans to use the ARC Research Praxis Fellowship to study the experiences of immigrants and the 2nd generation in new destinations of the United States, particularly looking at the South and Midwest through a comparative lens. These experiences include social and educational mobility, residential segregation, and perceptions of discrimination.

Taryn Malcolm
Taryn Malcolm is currently a doctoral student and member of Loraine Obler’s Neurolinguistics lab in the Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences Department at the Graduate Center. Her current research investigates how verb markers are affected from cross-linguistic influence in healthy adult speakers of Jamaican Creole and Standard English. This research will serve as the basis for further research in bilingual Jamaican Creole-Standard English speakers who have a language impairment following a stroke. She holds an M.A. in Speech-Language Pathology from St. John’s University and is a practicing speech-language pathologist.


Kahdeidra Martin
Kahdeidra Monét Martin
is Ph.D. student in Urban Education at the Graduate Center, The City University of New York. She holds a B.A. degree in African and African American Studies from Stanford University, with a minor in Linguistics, and she has studied education leadership and reform at Teachers College, Columbia University. As a NYC Teaching Fellow, she earned an M.S.Ed. in Teaching Urban Adolescents with Disabilities from Long Island University. Her research interests include critical sociolinguistics, contrastive analysis strategies, culturally relevant literacy curricula, the intersections of religious and linguistic ideology in education, and the language practices of multilingual and multidialectal African-descended youth. Kahdeidra is the publisher and editor at Dimonet Connect Publishing, where she has authored two bilingual children’s books, I Love Myself, Do You? and Saturday is My Favorite Day, and one collection of poetry, Saltwater Rivers. In July 2017, she will begin a two year term as a member of the Citywide Council on English Language Learners at the NYC Department of Education. 

Matthew Stuck
Matt Stuck
is a PhD student in the Linguistics Program at the CUNY Graduate Center, and is a member of the Second Language Acquisition Lab under the direction of Prof. Gita Martohardjono. He has worked as a research assistant for the past two years on a project that investigates language change across two generations of bilingual Spanish-English speakers residing in NYC. During his ARC tenure, he plans to employ quantitative methods to understand how individual demographic and language-use variables shape language shift in bilingual heritage speakers.  Prior to joining the Linguistics Program, he was an instructor of English as a Second/ Foreign Language in programs in Seattle, New York, and China, and earned an MA TESOL from NYU Steinhardt. His primary research interests lie at the intersections of structured language variation and second language acquisition (SLA), heritage languages, and endangered languages. In the future, he hopes to investigate the similarities and differences in modeling stability of linguistic variation across majority, minority, and L2 language varieties.

Kelsey Swift
Kelsey Swift
is a Ph.D. student in linguistics at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Before coming to the Graduate Center, she served as a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant in Mexico and taught English as a Second Language to adults in Boston. Her work involves both education and linguistics and is focused on the development of second language instruction that is empirically motivated and rooted in social justice. Her interests include adult second language acquisition, pedagogy and curriculum design, multilingualism, and critical sociolinguistics. She is currently developing a project which uses various sociolinguistic methodologies to investigate the role of ‘nonstandard’/vernacular input in instructed English learning.






Laxman Timilsina
is currently pursuing his Ph.D in Economics at the Graduate Center. He is interested in learning how society distributes opportunity and if that has an impact on overall inequality. And if such opportunities if distributed equally or provided to the most vulnerable will help them escape poverty? He is interested in researching about the impact of wealth we accumulate (inheritance or gift) from our parents. How much advantage we inherit from our families’ wealth and status directly impacts the opportunity that society provides to us which undermines fairer competition and upward mobility. Such advantages could not only be passed on through wealth but as education, health and political connection (power) among others. He believes inequality should be primarily viewed as ex ante and hope to learn and research about such topics as he moves in his education life and beyond. 

Sara Vogel
Sara Vogel
is a doctoral student in the Graduate Center's Urban Education program. She is interested in conducting applied research at the intersection of computer science education, bilingual education and social justice pedagogy, in partnership with educators and school communities. She aims to put students' diverse languaging practices, cultural backgrounds and interests at the center of teaching and learning with digital media and technology. As an instructor at  the Hunter College School of Education, she guides pre- and in-service teachers to reflect on the theory, history, and policy of bilingual education in ways that support their development of equitable and transformational classroom practice. In collaboration with the NYC-based Hive Research Lab, she also founded the CS Education Visions project, which has surfaced the diverse visions that formal and informal educators have for universal computer science education initiatives.

Sage Yim
Sejung Sage Yim
is a PhD student in Sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center. She also works at the Research Center for Korean Community at Queens College, where she is involved in various quantitative and qualitative projects related to Korean Americans. Her main research interests include immigration, race and ethnicity, and transnationalism focusing on contemporary immigrants’ experiences in the United States. Having immigrated to the U.S. relatively recently, she is particularly interested in immigrants’ growing transnational ties with their home country. Using mixed methods, she intends to examine the active role played by the emigrant state, i.e., the South Korean government, in promoting and strengthening overseas Koreans’ cross-border linkages, and how that has affected their ethnic identity and assimilation in the host country within various historical and social contexts.

Lianye Zhu
Lianye Zhu is a Ph.D. student in linguistics at the Graduate Center, City, University of New York. She received a B. A. in English from Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China), and a M. A. TESOL from Michigan State University. Her current research focuses on building a corpus as a tool to investigate a currently under development — not yet stabilized, and subject to idiosyncratic variation — orthography for Shanghainese, which has long been a vernacular only language that is mainly spoken in urban Shanghai city, China. The orthography, based on Mandarin Chinese characters, is being created by Shanghainese-Mandarin bilingual speakers who are passionate for writing in Shanghainese as a way of establishing their social identities, and promoting Shanghainese. The corpus will provide references of developing Shanghainese textbook to community-based organizations that teach Shanghainese to adult immigrants who are literate in Mandarin.


Read about past student fellows.