Advanced Research Collaborative  

DISTINGUISHED VISITING FELLOWS

Below are profiles of the 2018-2019 Distinguished Visiting Fellows: 


Mihail Arandarenko
Mihail Arandarenko is a professor of labor economics at the Faculty of Economics of the University of Belgrade, Serbia. He was a visiting fellow at the London School of Economics and at Collegium Budapest – Institute for Advanced Study. He has published on issues of labor markets, employment programs, political economy and social policy, especially in the context of difficult socio-economic transformation in South Eastern Europe. More recently he has researched the interplay of migration and inequality in the Western Balkans and while at the Graduate Center he plans to expand his research to labor exporting countries in other regions of the world.









Jasone Cenoz
Jasone Cenoz
is Professor of Research Methods in Education at the University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Spain. Her research focuses on multilingual education, third language acquisition, bilingualism and multilingualism. Specific topics Jasone Cenoz has investigated in her research include the multilingual lexicon, translanguaging in written production, minority languages, metalinguistic awareness, linguistic landscape, language anxiety and cross-linguistic influence. She is the author of a large number of articles and book chapters and the award-winning monograph Towards Multilingual Education (Multilingual Matters, 2009). Her latest book is Multilingual Education: Between Language Learning and Translanguaging with Cambridge Applied Linguistics (co-edited with Durk Gorter). Jasone Cenoz is Past President of the International Association of Multilingualism, and served as AILA publications coordinator for 8 years. She has recently been appointed President of Educational Science of the Spanish Research Council (Agencia Estatal de Investigación).

 
Donette Francis
Donette Francis
directs the American Studies Program at the University of Miami, where she is Associate Professor of English and founding member of the Hemispheric Caribbean Studies Collective. She is the author of Fictions of Feminine Citizenship: Sexuality and the Nation in Contemporary Caribbean Literature. Dr. Francis is currently working on two book projects: The Novel 1960s, an intellectual history of the Anglophone Caribbean’s transnational literary culture; and Creole Miami: Black Arts in the Magic City, a sociocultural history of black arts practice in Miami from 1980s to present. She specializes in transnational American Studies, Caribbean literary and intellectual histories, African diaspora literary studies, globalization and transnational feminist studies, and theories of sexuality and citizenship.
 







Guadalupe Garcia
Guadalupe García
specializes in colonial Latin America and the Caribbean.  Her research interests include colonial cities, urban space, and legal topographies.  Her first book was published in 2016 with the University of California Press and is entitled Beyond the Walled City: Colonia Exclusion in Havana.  Her current project explores how the multiple, competing geographies of nineteenth-century Havana might be made visible with the use of digital technologies.  The project moves beyond mapping to also consider the ways in which space, scale, and projection can be used to counter the logic of the archive and expand our contemporary understanding of cities.













 
Marc Helbling
Marc Helbling is full professor in political sociology[uni-bamberg.de] at the Department of Political Science at the University of Bamberg and a Research Fellow at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center. He was a visiting lecturer at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University and a visiting scholar at the Centres for European Studies at Harvard University and New York University. He spent shorter research stays at the European University Institute in Florence, at Oxford University, the University of Sydney and at McGill University. He was an elected member of The Young Academy [diejungeakademie.de]at the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities and the National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. He works on immigration and citizenship policies, nationalism, national identities, xenophobia/islamophobia, and right-wing populism. His research was awarded the Young Scholar Research Award from the Mayor of Berlin, the Best Article Award (Honorable Mention) by APSA’s Section on Migration and Citizenship and the Best Paper Award by the Immigration Research Network of the Council for European Studies. His work has appeared in political science journals (e.g., British Journal of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, European Journal of Political Research), sociology journals (e.g., European Sociological Review, Social Forces) and migration journals (e.g., International Migration Review, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies). He has edited a volume on “Islamophobia in the West”[routledge.com] (Routledge) and co-authored a book on “Political Conflict in Western Europe”[cambridge.org] (Cambridge UP).

Mathieu Ichou
Mathieu Ichou
is a tenured researcher at the French Institute for Demographic Studies (INED), where he belongs to the research units on International Migrations and Minorities and on Economic Demography. He is currently one of the principal investigators of the second edition of Trajectoires et Origines, a large-scale nationally representative survey on immigrants and their descendants in France. Before joining INED, he completed a PhD at Sciences Po focused on the academic trajectories of children of immigrants in France and the UK, for which he received the European Consortium for Sociological Research Best Dissertation Prize. He then held a Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellowship at Nuffield College, University of Oxford. His research interests include the study of migration, with an emphasis on immigrant selectivity, the sociology of education, social stratification and inequality, and international comparison. He has recently authored a book on children of immigrants in French schools and co-edited another on the “migrant crisis” in Europe. His work has also been published by academic presses and journals, including Stanford University Press, European Sociological Review, Oxford Review of Education and Population.


 
Salvatore Morelli
Salvatore Morelli
is Visiting Assistant Professor at the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality and ARC Distinguished Fellow at the Graduate Center, CUNY. He holds a DPhil in Economics from the University of Oxford and is also a research associate at the Center for Studies of Economics and Finance (CSEF) at the University of Naples, "Federico II". His current research projects focus on the estimation of personal wealth concentration and its evolution over time. His research to date has also investigated the distributional effect of macroeconomic crises, with particular reference to top income groups; the empirical and theoretical foundations of the view that inequality may contribute to economic and financial instability; and the evolution and measurement of several dimensions of economic inequality over time for a series of countries.




Francisco OrdonezFrancisco Ordóñez was trained in the study of formal linguistics at CUNY. His specialization has been the comparative study of the syntax of Spanish and other Romance languages such as Catalan, Portuguese, French, Italian, Sardinian, Corsican, and Occitan and their various dialects. His present research involves the study of the syntactic differences of the dialects of Spanish spoken in Latin America and Spain as well as studies of syntactic variation in Catalan, Spanish and Italian Dialects. He also co-founded Romania Nova with Mary Kato of Universidade de Campinas (Brazil). This international research collective promotes comparative research on Romance varieties spoken in the Americas. He is working now on how varieties of Spanish come together in US urban settings such New York and the system emerging from contact between those varieties and English.





 
Lordes Ortega

Lourdes Ortega is a Professor at Georgetown University, where she mentors language educators and linguistics doctoral students. She investigates how adults learn new languages, particularly in higher education settings. She is best known for an award-winning meta-analysis of second language instruction published in 2000, a best-seller graduate-level textbook Understanding Second Language Acquisition (Routledge 2009, translated into Mandarin in 2016), and since 2010 for championing a bilingual and social justice turn in her field of second language acquisition. Her latest books, both published this year, are Usage-inspired L2 Instruction, with John Benjamins (co-edited with applied cognitive linguist Andrea Tyler and colleagues) and The Handbook of Bilingualism with Cambridge University Press (co-edited with infant bilingualism researcher Annick De Houwer). Lourdes was born, raised, and college-educated in southern Spain, spent a year abroad at the University of Munich in the early 1980s, worked as a teacher of Spanish for almost a decade in Greece, and obtained her doctorate in the United States, the country where she has lived for 25 years now. These choices have afforded her a different dominant language at different periods in her life (so far): Spanish, German, Modern Greek, and English. This trajectory has shaped her professional identities as an educator and a researcher. She is committed to investigating what it means to become bilingual or multilingual later in life and across elite and marginalized contexts for language learning. In her work she seeks to encourage connections between research and teaching and to support harmonious bilingualism and the well-being of all multilinguals.


David Peetz
David Peetz
is Professor of Employment Relations at Griffith University, in the Centre for Work, Organisation and Wellbeing. He previously worked at the Australian National University and in the then Australian Department of Industrial Relations, spending over five years as a manager in its Senior Executive Service. He has undertaken work for unions, employers, the International Labor Organisation and governments of both political persuasions in and outside of Australia, including a recent statutory report to the Queensland Minister on the operation of the workers compensation scheme. He is on the Board of The Union Education Foundation and has written on union training, membership and delegates, working time, workplace relations practice, policy and law, individualism and collectivism, gender, sustainability, finance, and many other topics.  He is the author of Unions in a Contrary World (Cambridge University Press, 1998) and Brave New Workplace (Allen & Unwin, 2006) and co-author of Women of the Coal Rushes (UNSW Press, 2010) and many chapters in Women, Work and Regulation: Varieties of Gender Gaps, as well as numerous academic articles, papers and reports.  His current research includes investigations of the future of work, digital human technology, and the harassment of scientists.


Alastair Pennycook
Alastair Pennycook is Distinguished Professor of Language, Society and Education at the University of Technology Sydney and Adjunct Professor at the MultiLing Centre at the University of Oslo. He is the author of numerous books, including Metrolingualism: Language in the city (with Emi Otsuji), Language and Mobility: Unexpected Places, Language as a Local Practice, Global Englishes and Transcultural Flows, Critical applied linguistics: A critical introduction, and The Cultural Politics of English as an International Language (now a Routledge Linguistics Classic). His most recent books are Posthumanist applied linguistics (Routledge) and Popular culture, voice and linguistic diversity: Young adults on- and offline (with Sender Dovchin and Shaila Sultana; Palgrave Macmillan).  


Preeti Sampat
Preeti Sampat
is currently working on a book manuscript on conflicts over land around urbanization and infrastructure investments in India. My project analyzes 'India's land impasse' in the current historical conjuncture of the rise of Hindutva (Hindu nationalism); India's growing 'rentier economy;' and ongoing struggles against 'growth infrastructures' that articulate possibilities for 'development from below.' My research interests include legal anthropology; the anthropology of infrastructure; urbanization; capital; nature; state; social movements; democracy; and fascism.











Anwar Shaikh
Anwar Shaikh
is Professor of Economics at the Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science of the New School University, Associate Editor of the Cambridge Journal of Economics, from 2000-2005 Senior Scholar and member of the Macro Modeling Team at the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College. His most recent book is Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises from Oxford University Press 2016, his intellectual biography is included in the book Eminent Economists II from Cambridge University Press 2014, and in 2013 he was awarded the Social Science Prize of the NordSud International Prize for Literature and Science of the Fondazione Pescarabruzzo in Italy for his paper on George Soros’ notion of reflexivity entitled "Reflexivity, Path-Dependence and Disequilibrium Dynamics" in the Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Fall 2010. He was the recipient of two successive grants from the Initiative for New Economic Thinking (INET) in 2011-2012. A prior book was Globalization and the Myths of Free Trade (2007, Routledge). He has written on international trade, finance theory, political economy, macroeconomic policy, the welfare state, growth theory, inflation theory, crisis theory, national and global inequality, and past and current global economic crises. Some recent articles are "Income Distribution, Econophysics and Piketty", Review of Political Economy, 2016, 18-29 July; "Race, gender and the econophysics of income distribution in the USA", with Nikolaos Papanikolaou and Noe  Wiener, Physica A 415 (2014) 54–60; "On the role of reflexivity in economic analysis", Journal of Economic Methodology (2014), 439-445; and "The First Great Depression of the 21st Century", Socialist Register, (2011), Fall.


Kathryn Spellman Poots
Kathryn Spellman Poots
is a Visiting Associate Professor at Columbia University and Academic Program Director for the MA in Islamic Studies. She is also Associate Professor at Aga Khan University's Institute for the Study of Muslim Civilizations in London. Kathryn convenes Columbia's MA core course: Foundation to Islamic Studies and Muslim Societies. Her research interests include Muslims in Europe and North America, the Iranian diaspora, transnational migration and gender studies.Her publications include the monograph: Religion and Nation: Iranian Local and Transnational Networks in Britain (Berghahn, Oxford and New York, 2005); the co-edited volumes: Gender, Governance & Islam: Women, Islam and the State Revisited (Edinburgh University Press, 2018); The Political Aesthetics of Global Protest: The Arab Spring and Beyond (Edinburgh University Press, 2016) and Ethnographies of Islam: Ritual Performances and Everyday Practices (Edinburgh University Press, 2014); and book chapters:  “Second-Generation Muslims and the Making of British Shi’ism” in Kasinitz, P. & Bozorgmehr, M. (eds.) Growing Up Muslim in Europe and North America, Routledge; and Spellman Poots, K. & Gholami, R. (2018) “Iranians in Great Britain: Integration, Cultural Production and Challenges of Identity” in Mobasher, M. (ed.) Iranians in Diaspora: Comparative Perspective on Iranian Immigrants in the United States, Canada, Australia, and Europe, University of Texas Press. Kathryn consults for organizations that focus on the rights and experiences of refugees and minority groupings, including the UNHRC (Geneva), UNESCO (Paris) and London Detainee Support Group.

Anna Steigemann
Anna Steigemann
works as a Senior Researcher at the Chair of International Urbanism (Habitat Unit) at the Technical University Berlin (TU Berlin). Her research interests focus on critical urban studies, migration and the city, and particularly on refugee migration, as well as on community and neighborhood studies. These research interests culminate in Anna’s current research as a principal investigator in the special research track (SFB) "Re-figurations of Space" on "Architectures of Asylum.“ She graduated in Social Sciences with a focus on Urban Sociology, Geography, Ethnology and Gender Studies at Humboldt-University Berlin. Anna has further worked as an assistant professor at the Chair for Urban Studies & Social Research at Bauhaus-University Weimar, the Institutes for Sociology and Urban & Regional Planning at TU Berlin, and worked as a lecturer and researcher at the Department for Urban & Regional Sociology at Humboldt University's Institute for Social Sciences. Her post-doctoral research focuses on newly emerging urban arrival infrastructures on such streets that help Syrian refugees to settle and integrate into their new places of asylum as well as on the spatial practices and spatial knowledge of refugees that create these infrastructures. In this context and during her ARC visit, she will engage with New York’s existing and emerging arrival infrastructures as well study ethnographically the everyday life and inclusion of Syrian refugees in the city.
 

Read about past Distinguished Visiting Fellows