Advanced Research Collaborative  

DISTINGUISHED VISITING FELLOWS


Below are profiles of the 2017-2018 Distinguished Visiting Fellows: 

Gülseli Baysu
Gülseli Baysu
is an associate professor of social and political psychology at Kadir Has University, Turkey.  She is also an affiliated member of the Center for Social and Cultural Psychology at the University of Leuven. Her research interests focus on social psychology of cultural diversity, immigration and integration, educational success of immigrants (particularly of European Muslim immigrants), intergroup relations, identity processes and identity politics. She has recently published papers on how perceptions of equal treatment enhance achievement and belonging of Muslim minority adolescents in European schools (Child Development, 2016, 87-5, 1352-1366) and on the intersectionality of Muslim identity with political identities in the Gezi park protests of Turkey (Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 2017, 20-3, 350-366). During her ARC visit, she will conduct studies to analyze school achievement and belonging of Muslim minority youth longitudinally as a function of their positive and negative experiences of intergroup contact, particularly with majority peers and teachers, and she wants to add a comparative dimension by comparing Belgium with Germany and possibly with the US.

Bruce Bradbury
Bruce Bradbury
is an Associate Professor at the Social Policy Research Centre at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.  His research interests include the measurement of living standards, poverty and inequality, income support, labor market and housing policies, child learning outcomes, consumer equivalence scales and the spatial dimensions of inequality and disadvantage.  In 2001 he co-edited The Dynamics of Child Poverty in Industrialised Countries (with Jenkins and Micklewright) and in 2015 he published Too many children left behind: The U.S. achievement gap in comparative perspective (with Corak, Waldfogel and Washbrook). During his ARC visit he will be working on a project using LIS data to examine the impact of employment and earnings on the living standards of children and their families in rich and middle income countries.




Marius Busemeyer
Marius R. Busemeyer
is a Full Professor of Political Science at the University of Konstanz, Germany. His research focuses on comparative political economy and welfare state research, education and social policy, public spending, theories of institutional change and, more recently, public opinion on the welfare state. Busemeyer studied political science, economics, public administration and public law at University of Heidelberg and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He holds a doctorate in political science from the University of Heidelberg. He worked as a senior researcher with Wolfgang Streeck and Kathleen Thelen at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies in Cologne and was a post-doc visiting fellow at the Center for European Studies at Harvard before coming to Konstanz. His publications include a book on Skills and Inequality (Cambridge University Press, Winner of the 2015 Stein Rokkan Prize for Comparative Social Science Research), an edited volume (with Christine Trampusch) on The Political Economy of Collective Skill Formation (Oxford University Press) as well as a large number of journal articles in leading outlets of the discipline such as the British Journal of Political Science, the European Sociological Review, the Socio-Economic Review and the Journal of European Social Policy. He directs the project “Investing in Education in Europe”, funded by a Starting Grant from the European Research Council (ERC). 

Regina Kunzel
Regina Kunzel
holds the Doris Stevens Chair and is Professor of History and Gender and Sexuality Studies at Princeton University. Kunzel’s research focuses on histories of gender and sexuality, carcerality, and on the twined histories of sexual deviance and normalcy.  She is the author of Criminal Intimacy: Prison and the Uneven History of Modern American Sexuality (University of Chicago Press, 2008), Fallen Women, Problem Girls: Unmarried Mothers and the Professionalization of Social Work, 1890 to 1945 (Yale University Press, 1993), and articles on transgender studies, disability studies, the history of prison sexual culture, single pregnancy, and gender and professionalization.  Her current project explores the encounter of LGBT/queer people with psychiatry in the twentieth-century United States.

Leketi Makalela
Leketi Makalela
is a professor of language and literacy education and a founding Director of the Hub for Multilingual Education and Literacies (HuMEL) at the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. His area of research is on translanguaging where he  questions the validity of boundaries between languages and literacies. He envisions all classroom encounters as transformative spaces where more than one language is used fluidly to enhance knowledge access and affirm multilingual student identities. To this end, he has  developed a language and literacy framework that builds of the African cultural competence of infinite relations of dependency - ubuntu translanguaging, also known as multilanguaging, which  posits that no one language is complete without the other.  As a community builder he trains  in-service teachers, lecturers and community stakeholders on alternative pedagogies and epistemologies to effect system wide change in schools. As a public speaker advocating for social change through literacy, he released a series of talks on Feeding Children's Minds with Words. His books include New Directions in Language and Literacy Education  for Multilingual Learners in Africa (2015); Multilanguaging, Decolonization and Education in the Global South: Shifting Lenses (2017); New Multilingual Practices in Post-Apartheid South Africa (2018). 

Salvatore Morelli
Salvatore Morelli
is Visiting Assistant Professor at the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality. He did his undergraduate degree at the University of Rome and, in 2013, obtained his doctorate from the Department of Economics, the University of Oxford with a thesis on The Long-run Evolution of Macroeconomic Shocks and Inequality. In 2014 he received a major grant for the study of economic inequality funded by the Institute of New Economic Thinking (INET) entitled ‘The History of Economic Inequality: income, Wealth and Financial Crisis,” jointly with Facundo Alvaredo, Anthony B. Atkinson, Francis Dennig, Thomas Piketty and Max Rosen. While at ARC and the Stone Center, he will be overseeing the design, implementation, management and launching of a project aimed at creating a new information/data system related to high-end wealth, with an initial focus on top wealth in the United States. He will also be conducting research on income and wealth distribution more generally. His publications include: Post-1970 Trends in Within-country Inequality and Poverty, (with T. Smeeding and J.P Thompson), Handbook of Income Distribution, Vol. 2, eds. A. Atkinson and F. Bourguignon, Elsevier, 2015; Inequality and Crises Revisited, (with A. B. Atkinson), Economia Politica, Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, February 2015; The Challenge of Measuring UK Wealth Inequality in the 2000s, (with F. Alvaredo and A.B. Atkinson), Fiscal Studies, Spring 2016.

Finex Ndhlovu
Finex Ndhlovu
is Associate Professor of Language in Society at the University of New England in Armidale, Australia. His research interests sit at the cutting edge of contemporary linguistic and socio-cultural theories around language, identity and sociality in relation to transnational African migrant and diaspora communities; language and development; and language and everyday forms of exclusion. He has previously held teaching and research positions at Victoria University in Melbourne, the University of Fort Hare in South Africa and the Midlands State University in Zimbabwe. From July to December 2015, Finex was a Visiting Professor at the Archie Mafeje Institute of Social and Policy Research, University of South Africa. His most recent major publications include Language, Vernacular Discourse and Nationalisms: Uncovering the Myths of Transnational Worlds (forthcoming); The Social and Political History of Southern Africa’s Languages (2017); Language, Migration, Diaspora: Challenging the Big Battalions of Groupism (2016); Hegemony and Language Policies in Southern Africa: Identity, Integration, Development (2015); and Becoming an African Diaspora in Australia: Language, Culture, Identity (2014). Finex is an experienced supervisor of higher degree student research projects with an outstanding record of completions.

Brian Nolan
Brian Nolan
is Director of the Employment, Equity and Growth Programme at the Institute for New Economic Thinking, Oxford Martin School, Professor of Social Policy at the Department of Social Policy and Intervention, and Senior Research Fellow at Nuffield College Oxford. His main areas of research are income inequality, poverty, and the economics of social policy. He has led and participated in a wide range of comparative studies on poverty, income inequality, social policies, tax and transfer policies, the labour market, the minimum wage, and health inequalities and healthcare. His publications include The Handbook of Economic Inequality (2008) co-edited with W. Salverda and T. Smeeding, Poverty and Deprivation in Europe (2011) co-authored with C. T. Whelan, The Great Recession and the Distribution of Household Income (2013), co-edited with S. Jenkins, A. Brandolini and J. Micklewright, two co-edited volumes with W. Salverda et al., Changing Inequalities in Rich Countries: Analytical and Comparative Perspectives and Changing Inequalities and Societal Impacts in Rich Countries: Thirty Countries’ Experiences (2014), and Children of Austerity: The Impact of the Great Recession on Child Poverty in Rich Countries, co-edited with B. Cantillon, Y. Czhzen, and S. Handa, all from Oxford University Press.
 
Sari Pietikaninen
Sari Pietikäinen, is a Professor of Discourse Studies at the Department of Language and Communication, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. She is a vice-head for the department (responsible for research, 2013-2017) and a member of the executive board for Research Collegium for Language in Changing Society (ReCLaS, Academy of Finland 2016-2020). Her research focuses on discourse, identity and social inequalities, multilingualism in transforming peripheries, and language in expanding Arctic economies of tourism, nature resource extraction and sports.  She is also interested in developing research methodologies including critical discourse studies, critical sociolinguistics and ethnography. She has also been involved in developing various knowledge exchange practices by leading Jyväskylä Discourse Hub (http://www.discoursehub.fi). Her recent publications include Critical Sociolinguistic Research Methods: Studying Language Issues that Matter (with Monica Heller and Joan Pujolar, 2018, Routledge), Sociolinguistics from periphery. Small languages in new circumstances (with Helen Kelly-Holmes, Alexandre Jaffe and Nikolas Coupland, 2016, Cambridge), Multilingualism and Periphery (edited volume with Helen Kelly-Holmes, 2013, Oxford) She is currently the Principal Investigator of a Academy of Finland (SA) research project called Cold Rush: language and identity in expanding Arctic economies (2016-2020).

Dan Rabinowitz
Dan Rabinowitz
is a Professor at the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Tel-Aviv University.  Held visiting professorship at Princeton, NYU, University of Toronto, CEU (Budapest). Currently (Fall 2017) Visiting Faculty at Columbia University (SIPA) and at ARC, CUNY Graduate Center. Served as Head of The Porter School of Environmental Studies at TAU (2013-2017) and as President of the Israeli Anthropological association (1996-2000). Published books with Cambridge University Press, University of California at Berkeley Press, Ashgate and leading Israeli publishers. His articles appeared in leading scholarly journals including American Ethnologist, Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Critical Inquiry, International Journal of Middle East Studies, Annual Review of Anthropology and  Environmental Justice.  Served as editor in chief of Israeli Sociology (2012-2017). Has over 300 Op-Ed articles in Haaretz, and frequently appears on TV and Radio shows. Chairman of Life and Environment (2004-2006), Chairman of Greenpeace Mediterranean (1998-2004), Vice Chairman of Greenpeace UK (2006-2014); Currently  Chairman of the Israeli Association for Environmental Justice. June 2016: awarded the Green Globe Award for life long environmental leadership.

Jeffrey Reitz
Jeffrey G. Reitz (Ph.D., FRSC) is the R.F. Harney Professor and Director of the Ethnic, Immigration and Pluralism Studies Program at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, and Professor and former Chair in the University’s Department of Sociology.  He has published extensively on immigration and inter-group relations in Canada from comparative perspectives, and has frequently contributed to discussions of policies on immigration, multiculturalism and immigrant employment in Canada.  He is co-author of Multiculturalism and Social Cohesion: Potentials and Challenges of Diversity (2009); recent articles have appeared in the International Migration Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, and Social Science Research.  During 2012-2014 he was Marie Curie International Fellow at l’École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) in Paris, and is a Research Fellow with the Institute for Research on Public Policy in Montreal. 

Jonathan Senchyne
Jonathan Senchyne
is an assistant professor of book history and print culture in the Information School at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he is also the director of the Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture[wiscprintdigital.org]. He has a Ph.D. in English from Cornell. He is currently completing a book on the meaning making dimensions of paper in early and nineteenth-century American literature entitled Intimate Paper and the Materiality of American Literature, under contract with the University of Massachusetts Press’s series on Studies in Print Culture and the History of the Book. With Brigitte Fielder, he is coeditor of Infrastructures of African American Print (University of Wisconsin Press). Senchyne’s essays have appeared or are forthcoming in PMLA, Book History, Technology and Culture, Studies in Romanticism, Early African American Print Culture, Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016, and elsewhere. He has held fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Antiquarian Society, and the New York Public Library. With Martin Foys, Senchyne is co-PI on grants from CLIR and the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation to develop and implement DM: Digital Maxima, an open source platform for creating architectures of linked, annotated, and searchable data among digital surrogates of archival texts and media. 

Miri Song
Miri Song
is Professor of Sociology at the University of Kent, in Canterbury, England. She received her BA in History & Literature from Harvard University and her Ph.D. in social policy from the London School of Economics. She is the author of several books: Helping Out: Children’s Labor in Ethnic Businesses (Temple University Press 1999), Choosing Ethnic Identity (Polity Press 2003), and Mixed Race Identities (with Peter Aspinall) (Palgrave Macmillan 2013). She has just completed her latest book: Multiracial Parents: Mixed Families, Generational Change, and the Future of Race (NYU Press 2017). Her research interests include ethnicity and race, migration, racisms, multiracial people and families.
 






Virginia Zavala
Virginia Zavala is a sociolinguistics professor of the Humanities Department at the Pontificia Universidad Católica in Lima, Perú. She is a scholar of issues surrounding language and education, with a focus on the Andes. Her work includes studies of bilingual programs and policies, revitalization of indigenous languages, as well as academic literacies and classroom discourse. She has previously been a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Professor Zavala received her B.A. in Linguistics and Literature from PUCP in 1994, and her M.A. (1997) and Ph.D. (2001) in Sociolinguistics from Georgetown University. Batallas por el Quechua (2014) is her latest book. She recently edited a volume on the discursive construction of racialized identities (Racismo y Lenguaje, 2017)  and is currently doing research on Quechua Youth activism, new media and education in Perú.  


Read about past Distinguished Visiting Fellows