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Courses

Core Course

CTCP 71088 Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices
Prof. John Brenkman Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [36437]

Elective Courses

ANTH 78500/SPAN 80100 Language Ideologies & Practices
Prof. Miki Makihara Thursdays 2:00-4:00 [36176]

ANTH 71700/PSYC 79103 Environment Sciences III and Cultural Theory
Prof. Melissa Checker Mondays 2:00-4:00 [36333]

ART 77200 Circles of Collaboration in US Art: from Ashcan School to Black Mountain
Prof. Katherine Manthorne Mondays 4:15-6:15 [36024]

ART 86010 Afterlife of the 19th century: Art in Europe 1900-1925
Prof. Romy Golan Thursdays 2:00-4:00 [36025]

ART 86020 Modern Painting
Prof. David Joselit Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [36026]

ART 86040 Art History and the Subject of Biography
Prof. Michael Lobel Wednesdays 9:30-11:30 [36027]

CLAS 71300 Selections from Plato
Prof. Peter Simpson Mondays 4:15-6:15 [36060]
 
CLAS 75200/PHIL 76100  Special Topics in Classics: Philosophy and Its Rivals in the Platonic Dialogues
Prof. Nickolas Pappas Mondays 11:45-1:45 PM [36516]

CL 79500 Theory and Practice of Literary Criticism:  Comparative Literature in the Age of Globalization
Prof. Sonali Perera Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [36064]

CL 80100/HIST 72400/PSC 71902 The Outcome of German Classical Philosophy
Prof. Richard Wolin Mondays 6:30-8:30 [36069]

CL 80900 Intro to Renaissance Studies: Neoplatonism Across Faith and Time
Profs. Clare Carroll and Feisal Mohamed Wednesday 2:00-4:00 [36066] 

CL 84000 Memory, Political Thought and Italian Destiny in the Works of Foscolo and Leopardi
Prof. Morena Corradi Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [36062]

CL 85000 Lyric, Prose, Modernity
Prof. Joshua Wilner Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [36065]

CL 85000 Neapolitan Narratives from Ferrante to Gomorra: Literature, Cinema, Television
Prof. Giancarlo Lombardi Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [36067]

CL 89100 Literary Theory & Criticism I
Prof. Martin Elsky Mondays 4:15-6:15 [36063]

ENGL 84500 Disaffection in Colonial Law and Literature
Prof. Tanya Agathocleous Fridays 11:45-1:45 [36088]

ENGL 76200 Identities
Prof. Meena Alexander Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [36089]

ENGL 86600 “The Poorer Nations”: Postcolonial Theory and World System
Prof. Peter Hitchcock Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [36092]

ENGL 79020 Writing with an Attitude: Navigating/Negotiating Voices within Critical Experimental Writing
Prof. Mark McBeth Mondays 4:15-615 [36095]


ENGL 75500 Readings in African American Literary and Cultural Criticism
Prof. Robert Reid-Pharr Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [36099]

ENGL 83500 Romanticism and Revolution: Literature, Philosophy and the Politics of Terror
Prof. Nancy Yousef Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [36103] 

FREN 70500 Writing The Self: From Confession to Life Writing
Prof. Domna C. Stanton Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [36085]

FREN 70700 Myth in French Literature and Film
Prof. Royal Brown Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [36086]

SPAN 70200 Spanish Literary Theory
Prof. Fernando Degiovanni Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [36174]
 
SPAN 85000 Contagious Affectivity: Body-Affect in Gombrowicz
Prof. Silvia Dapía Mondays 4:15-6:15 [36172]

SPAN 87100 Mexican Narcoimaginaries: State Power & Cultural Mediations of the Drug Trade
Prof. Oswaldo Zavala Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [36175] 

SPAN 87400 Jose Martí en dos mundos
Prof. Esther Allen Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [36179]

HIST 71200 The Intellectual Politics of the French Revolution
Prof. Helena Rosenblatt Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [36115]

HIST 77950 Islamic rulership: the caliphate in theory and practice
Profs. Anna Akasoy and Chase Robinson Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [36112]

HIST 70900 Human Rights and Nation-States: A Global History
Prof. Eric Weitz Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [36111]

MUS 83500 (Ethno)Musicology and Social Theory
Prof. Jane Sugarman Wednesdays 10:00-1:00 [36143]

MUS 88200 Musicology: Sound in Society
Prof. Eliot Bates Mondays 10:00-1:00 [36148]

MUS 86300 Musicology: Renaissance Musical Humanism
Prof. Chadwick Jenkins Mondays 2:00-5:00 [36146]

PHIL 77600 The Philosophy of Literature
Prof. Noel Carroll Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [36205]

PHIL 76000 Mind, Matter, and Experience in Early Modern Philosophy
Prof. Catherine Wilson Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [36210]

PHIL 77900/PSC 80302 Socialism and Democracy
Prof. Carol Gould Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [36206]

PHIL 76900/PSYC 80104 Philosophy of Social Science
Prof. John Greenwood Thursdays 9:30-11:30 [36214]

PSC 72100 American Political Thought
Prof. Ruth O’Brien Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [36607]

PSC 80302 Marxism
Prof. Jack Jacobs Mondays 2:00-4:00 [36244]

PSC 80602 Walter Benjamin
Prof. Susan Buck-Morss Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [36250]

PSC 70200 Modern Political Thought
Prof. Leonard Feldman Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [36253]

PSYC 74003 Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Critical Psychology
Prof. Susan Opotow Wednesdays 9:30-11:30 [36423]

PSYC 80103 The Study of Lives
Prof. Jason VanOra Mondays 4:15-6:15 [36430]

SOC 80000 Foucault, Bourdieu and Baudrillard:  Power, Culture and Social Change
Prof. Marnia Lazreg Mondays 4:15-6:15 [36219]

SOC 83101 Populism, Authoritarianism, and Dictatorship
Prof. John Torpey Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [36225]

SOC 74600 Political Economy and Social Change
Prof. Roslyn Bologh Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [36231]

SOC 86800 Sociology of Culture
Prof. David Halle Mondays 6:30-8:30 [36222]

THEA 80200 Seminar in A Dramatic Genre: Critical Perspectives on U.S. Musical Theatre 
Prof. David Savran Tuesdays 1:00-4:00 [36191]

THEA 80400 Seminar in Theatre Theory:  Extending Queer:  Theory and Performance/Theorizing Performance  
Prof. Sean Edgecomb Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [36192]

THEA 86000 Theatre and Society: Transatlantic Theatre and Performance: Golden Age Spain and Pre-Conquest/Colonial Latin America
Prof. Jean Graham-Jones Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [36194]

U ED 72200 Using Multilogical Frameworks in Research on Emotions
Prof. Konstantinos Alexakos Thurdsays 4:15-6:15 [36320]

U ED 75100 Authentic Inquiry in Urban Education
Prof. Kenneth Tobin Thursdays 6:30-8:30 [36321]

U ED 75100 Learning, Development, and Pedagogy: Sociocultural, Critical, and Dialectical Approaches
Prof. Anna Stetsenko Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [36480]



CTCP 71088 Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices
Prof. John Brenkman Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [36437]
Starting from the tension between Marx and Weber, the seminar will explore debates and developments that inform contemporary theory, focused around salient conflicts in social theory, philosophy, and aesthetics. (1) How do conflicting paradigms of society as system (Luhmann), as norm-governed institutions (Habermas), as symbolic-institutional habitus and practices (Bourdieu), or as actor-networks (Latour) bear on interdisciplinary research? (2) How does the encounter between philosophy and cultural studies illuminate or obscure the political purport of cultural analysis (Žižek, Sloterdijk, Habermas, Laclau, Butler)? (3) How to conceptualize the artwork or literary text in its difference from other objects and practices, its immersion in institutions and social networks, its hermeneutical instability and variability, its relation to prevailing forms of “communication” (Heidegger, Deleuze, Luhmann, Harman, and others)?
 
In the course of addressing these three blocs of critical theory, we will reflect on such fundamental concerns as the “linguistic turn” and the “affective turn”; alternative conceptions of “critique” as normative, utopian, or dialectical as well as rejections of critique as a model; the longstanding difference regarding the task of theory to change the world or to interpret it in various ways; and what is meant by “world” in the age of globalization.
 
Texts: Garth and Mills (eds.), From Max Weber; Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, What Is Philosophy?; Martin Heidegger, Poetry, Language, Thought; Pierre Bourdieu and Roger Chartier, The Sociologist and the Historian; Judith Butler, Ernesto Laclau, and Slavoj Žižek, Contingency, Hegemony, Universality; Peter Sloterdijk, In the World Interior of Capital. Excerpts and essays by Marx, Jürgen Habermas, Niklas Luhmann, Bruno Latour, Seyla Benhabib, Brian Massumi, Graham Harman, and others.
 
 
ANTH 78500/SPAN 80100 Language Ideologies & Practices
Prof. Miki Makihara Thursdays 2:00-4:00 [36176]
Studies of language in its sociocultural context highlight the role of language ideologies and cultural conceptions of language in reproducing and transforming social dynamics and power relations as well as language use and structure. In this seminar, we will explore linguistic anthropological and other theoretical frameworks and case studies to examine the relationship between language ideologies and social processes and their linguistic and social consequences. The topics considered include modern linguistics, colonialism, missionization, nationalism, globalization, citizenship, identity formation, indigenous movements, sociolinguistic hierarchies, racialization, language standardization, shift and revitalization. We will also examine different research traditions, theoretical issues, and data sources and collection methods, and how they relate to the understanding of language ideologies and language use and structure.

 
ANTH 71700/PSYC 79103 Environment Sciences III and Cultural Theory
Prof. Melissa Checker Mondays 2:00-4:00 [36333]
This course traces theoretical lineages in the social sciences and applies them to the study of environmental problems. Each week, we will read the work of an influential theorist and pair it with the work of a more contemporary scholar who studies how human societies understand, respond to and produce environmental change. In this way, we will not only become familiar with classic social theory, but also how that theory gets reformulated to shed new light on present-day environmental issues. Ultimately, students will gain a better understanding of how to usefully apply social theory to their own research findings.
The course will be conducted as a seminar:  work will be focused mainly on independent reading and writing, supported by class discussions. Students will be encouraged to apply their own intellectual and analytical skills to understanding (and connecting) a set of challenging but significant pieces in contemporary anthropology and social theory. Assessment will emphasize preparation, participation in open debate, and perceptive critical engagement as demonstrated in both oral and written work.

 
ART 77200 Circles of Collaboration in US Art: from Ashcan School to Black Mountain
Prof. Katherine Manthorne Mondays 4:15-6:15 [36024]
Myths of genius and individualism still cast a shadow over the study of modern art, but in reality many artists do their most creative work within a collaborative circle of like-minded associates. They experimented together, challenged one another and join in rebellion against established traditions. Drawing upon the sociology of art, this course explores the “lives” of a series of circles that help to define the course of modern art in the US. Class meetings cover: Ashcan School (The 8), Stieglitz Circle, Dadaists/Arensberg Circle, Katherine Dreier and Societé Anonyme, Harlem Renaissance, WPA/FSA, Mexican Muralists, American Abstract Artists & concluding with Black Mt. College.We investigate each circle via its contributors, particular works that bear traces of collaboration, exhibition strategies & the nature of gender dynamics.
 
Several museum visits are included. This course provides good orals preparation. Requirements include a midterm, final, short (10 page) research paper & weekly reading assignments.

Auditors by permission of the instructor only, maximum of five (5).


ART 86010 Afterlife of the 19th century: Art in Europe 1900-1925
Prof. Romy Golan Thursdays 2:00-4:00 [36025]
This seminar will examine the footprint of the 19th century on the early decades of the 20th century. We will touch on questions such as: the Belle Epoque as the subject of media theory; Art Nouveau/Jugendtil/Stile Liberty/Arte Joven and the animation of the inorganic; Futurism as a post-Symbolist style; the history of artificial darkness as a modern form; the Bauhaus as the end of empathy theory; the Call to Order as return of the non-same; Surrealism and the outmoded; Aby Warburg as art historical model; the exhibition as palimpsest; the heyday international fairs in Paris and elsewhere.
 
Historiographically we will pay attention to two different narratives: that of European scholars and curators for whom modernity is rooted in the 19th century, and the American approach which tends to be predicated on radical rupture. One example: Aux origines de l’abstraction 1800-1914 at the Musée d’Orsay (2004) vs. Inventing Abstraction 1910-1925 at MoMA (2013).

 
ART 86020 Modern Painting
Prof. David Joselit Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [36026]
This course will focus on important formal and theoretical issues in painting of the 20th and 21st century. While not a survey, it is designed to give an historical account of modern painting, through issues such as "non-objectivity;" painting and mechanical reproduction, and gesturalism. Coursework will include close readings of canonical art-historical texts, and intense exercises in close looking and formal analysis. No auditors.

 
ART 86040 Art History and the Subject of Biography
Prof. Michael Lobel Wednesdays 9:30-11:30 [36027]
Biography is a fraught topic in current art historical practice. It is simultaneously everywhere— in artist monographs, exhibition catalogue essays, and interviews—and nowhere, in that it is routinely dismissed in wide swaths of the discipline. In addition, it has often been deemed crucial to the recuperation of certain categories of artistic practice, including the careers of women artists and those from historically underrepresented or marginalized groups.
 
In this course we will tackle this problem head-on. We will read major critical texts on the subject—by such figures as Sigmund Freud, Roland Barthes, and Rosalind Krauss—in order to better understand the stakes of the discussion. We will also consider case studies in which biography offers a useful yet conflicted approach, as in feminist and queer interventions in the field, which often posit a stable artistic subject while simultaneously challenging that very notion. We will consider these issues in both methodological and practical terms, as in those cases in which the artist’s stated wishes—often categorized as “intention”— work against the interests of curators and art historians.
 
Questions to be addressed will include: Why is it that well-respected academic historians regularly write biographies, while the same isn’t true in the field of art history? Is it a coincidence that biography became widely dismissed at roughly the same moment certain groups began to assert their agency in the art world? How do we weigh the narratives that artists create about their lives against the scholarly commitment to provide an accurate account of the historical record? Our discussion of these questions will inform students’ approaches to their own individual research projects.
 

CLAS 71300 Selections from Plato
Prof. Peter Simpson Mondays 4:15-6:15 [36060]
The course will take the form of a study of the works of Plato through selected readings from them, including in particular parts of the Republic and Apology. A large question in Platonic scholarship, however, is the order of the dialogues and whether a chronological ordering (usually favored today) is better than some other or thematic ordering. Ancient authors, Neo-Platonists in particular, favored thematic orderings. They also regarded most Platonic works that have come down to us as really by Plato (including all the letters), while modern scholars tend to reject some at least of what the Neo-Platonists accepted (e.g. most of the letters). The course will begin with some discussion of the authenticity and ordering questions and then proceed to specific selections.


 
CLAS 75200/PHIL 76100  Special Topics in Classics: Philosophy and Its Rivals in the Platonic Dialogues
Prof. Nickolas Pappas Mondays 11:45-1:45 PM [36516]
As repository of wisdom, teacher, sage counsel to life; something serving the soul in the way that medical science serves the body; philosophy presents itself in Plato’s dialogues as an enterprise surrounded by competitors. Sophists and poets claimed to teach the public, and orators promised to lead. What did philosophers have to offer that was different?
Although this question can be entertained at a general level, it also leads into specific topics associated with Plato’s dialogues, such as
 
    the method of division and collection
    myths in Platonic dialogues and how to read them
    material in the dialogues (e.g. the story of Gyges) that has been reworked from other sources
    the representation of rival disciplines in Plato’s Symposium
 
Taking the question of rivals to philosophy as its guide, this seminar will familiarize itself with some Platonic works, paying special attention to how those works identify philosophy against drama, the interpretation of poetry, mythography, rhetoric, and sophistry.
 
Readings will include Ion, Sophist, Statesman; selections from Republic; and (time permitting) some or all of Phaedrus, Symposium, and Theaetetus. The seminar will make use of secondary literature in its reading assignments and in class presentations.
 
 
CL 79500 Theory and Practice of Literary Criticism:  Comparative Literature in the Age of Globalization
Prof. Sonali Perera Thursdays 4:15-6:15 [36064]
As a range of comparatist scholars have noticed, Marx observes in the manifesto (of all unlikely places) that world literature “arises” as the by-product of exploitative, even imperialist, designs. Where world literature is defined narrowly as literature of global circulation, its market driven, cosmopolitan character might be deemed to be the happy accident of capital movement guided by its cultural and economic custodians. But what happens when we expand and complicate our frame of reference? What of other methods and models for conceiving/reconceiving world literature as literary internationalism? What concepts and ideologies of comparison derive from a theory of value in a global and unequal world? And how do we understand the relationship between comparative literature and world literature—as antagonistic or supplementary?

Since Marx’s thoughts on the subject, in recent years, literary theory scholars find themselves returning to consider the problems and possibilities of world literature. The past two decades have seen a surge of publications agitating for and against both a revitalized Weltliteratur and a newly re-tooled comparative literature. WReC (The Warwick Research Collective) proposes a new world-systems theory approach which conceives of world-literature (with a hyphen) as a “re-making of comparative literature after the multicultural debates and the disciplinary critique of Eurocentricism.” In the latest issue of the PMLA journal devoted to “Literature in the World,” Simon Gikandi keeps the question alive: “But if world literature takes us everywhere and nowhere, are we better off with comparative literature, a disciplinary formation driven by the idea that literatures can be studied in their distinctive languages, across national and linguistic boundaries, without abandoning the languages and grounds that gave rise to them?” And yet, if in minimal terms, the study of comparative literature is distinguished from that of world literature on the grounds that the former requires specialized knowledge of multiple languages whereas world literature is merely literature in translation and generally studied in English, do we agree with how this academic sub-division of labor is coded and institutionalized? What is at stake in constructing the difference between world literary approaches and comparative literature in this way? Is it the case, as has been argued, that the turn to world literature has prompted a new strain of scholarship in comparative literature?
In our class, we will engage with some of these questions, as we take the measure of the state of the field debates. Throughout our course, you are encouraged to consider how these debates might shape the way that we think of research and writing in literary studies today.

Simply put, then, this course offers us a chance to study the resurgence of world literature as an interpretive paradigm against and through the perspective of new scholarship on the theory and practice of comparative literature. While we will study touchstone texts (by Goethe, Marx, Heidegger, Auerbach, Said, Jameson, Ahmad, Wallerstein, Moretti, Damrosch, Spivak, Saussy, Amin), we will also familiarize ourselves with recent scholarship including works by Casanova, Apter, Melas, Mufti, Robbins, Cheah, WReC, and Llowe. We will ground our discussions by “applying” theory to literary works by Woolf, Manto, Pamuk, Devi, and Salih. If time permits, alongside selections from theory and literature, we may also read excerpts from one or two of the ACLA’s emblematic state of the discipline reports.

Course requirements: 1.) A 20 minute presentation on one or two of the weekly readings. 2.)  A 2 page prospectus for the final paper. 3) A 15-20 page final paper. 4.) Engaged class participation.


CL 80100/HIST 72400/PSC 71902 The Outcome of German Classical Philosophy
Prof. Richard Wolin Mondays 6:30-8:30 [36069]
In 1886, Friedrich Engels wrote a perfectly mediocre book, Ludwig Feuerbach and the Outcome of Classical German Philosophy, which nevertheless managed to raise a fascinating and important question that is still being debated today: how should we go about evaluating the legacy of German Idealism following the mid-nineteenth century breakdown of the Hegelian system? For Engels, the answer was relatively simple: the rightful heir of classical German philosophy was Marx’s doctrine of historical materialism. But, in truth, Engels’ response was merely one of many possible approaches. Nor would it be much of an exaggeration to claim that, in the twentieth-century, there is hardly a philosopher worth reading who has not sought to define him or herself via a confrontation with the legacy of Kant and Hegel.

Classical German Philosophy – Kant, Fichte, Hegel, and Schelling – has bequeathed a rich legacy of reflection on the fundamental problems of epistemology, ontology and aesthetics. Even contemporary thinkers who claim to have transcended it (e.g., poststructuralists such as Foucault and Derrida) cannot help but make reference to it in order to validate their post-philosophical standpoints and claims.

Our approach to this very rich material will combine a reading of the canonical texts of German Idealism (e.g., Kant and Hegel) with a sustained and complementary focus on major twentieth-century thinkers who have sought to establish their originality via a critical reading of Hegel and his heirs: Alexandre Kojève, Martin Heidegger, Michel Foucault, Theodor Adorno, and Jürgen Habermas.

The course will primarily focus on the nexus between philosophy, reason, and, autonomy. We will also examine the substantive arguments that the school’s leading representatives have set forth, with special attention to the “healing” role of both reason and the aesthetic dimension. If thought and being are sundered in real life, art and reason offer the prospect of making the world whole once more. Thus, in German Classical philosophy, aesthetic consciousness often plays what one might describe as a redemptory or reconciliatory function.

In his “Discourse on Language” Foucault warns us appositely that, “Truly to escape Hegel involves an exact appreciation of the price we have to pay to detach ourselves from him. It assumes that we are aware of the extent to which Hegel, insidiously perhaps, is close to us; it implies a knowledge that permits us to think against Hegel, of that which remains Hegelian. Thus we have to determine the extent to which our anti-Hegelianism is possibly one of his tricks directed against us, at the end of which he stands, motionless, waiting for us.” Foucault’s insightful caveat will, in many respects, function as our interpretive watchword as we seek to decode and reconstruct German Idealism and its innovative contemporary legacies. ****


CL 80900 Intro to Renaissance Studies: Neoplatonism Across Faith and Time
Profs. Clare Carroll and Feisal Mohamed Wednesday 2:00-4:00 [36066] 
Engaging in questions of Platonic influence may seem to support a traditional view of the Renaissance as reviving and redoubling a unitary sense of Western culture tracing its roots to ancient Greece. This course poses a strong challenge to that narrative. By focusing on the Platonism of late antiquity, we in fact engage in a profound re-mapping of the period’s engagement with classical and medieval locales, one less centered on Athens and Rome and taking into its ken Alexandria, Damascus, and Baghdad.
 
The Neoplatonic tradition was the philosophical limgua franca of the Renaissance: the rediscovery of Plotinus and Proclus achieved in no small measure through the prodigious influence of Marsilio Ficino was a spark generating widespread interest. And as was recognized in the period, it is a tradition that spans all three Abrahamic faiths: the great wellspring of biblical Neoplatonism is the Jewish scholar Philo of Alexandria, whose influence can be discerned in the seminal Christian mysticism of Pseudo-Dionysius and in the Islamic tradition of falsafa. These interests certainly display themselves in literature, though this course will ask whether such engagements constitute thick intellectual engagement or a merely ornamental embellishment.
 
We will see in the course how Neoplatonism continues to provide a common philosophical language to theologians of all three faiths, as in the work of the twentieth-century Shi’a philosopher Henri Corbin and of the member of the “Radical Orthodoxy” school Simon Oliver.
 
Preliminary list of primary texts:
Ariosto, Ludovico. “Voyage to the Moon” from Orlando furioso.
Corbin, Henri. “Mundus Imaginalis” and selections from History of Islamic Philosophy
Crashawe, Richard. Poems.
Donne, John. Metempsychosis and Anniversaries.
Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite, Mystical Theology.
Ficino, Commentary on Plato’s Symposium on Love  and selections from Platonic Theology.
St. John of the Cross. Poems.
Al’Kindi. Selections from On First Philosophy.
Leone Hebreo (Judah Abrabanel). Dialoghi d’Amore.
Michelangelo. Sonnets.
Nicholas Cusanus. Selections from On Learned Ignorance, Dialogue on the Hidden God, and De pace fidei
Oliver, Simon. Selection from Radical Orthodoxy.
La Pléiade
Plotinus. Selections from Enneads
Porphyry. Against the Christians [fragments]
Proclus. Selections from Platonic Theology and Commentary on Plato’s “Parmenides”
Tullia d’Aragona, Dialogue on the Infinity of Love.
Smith, John. Selections from Dialogues.
Spenser, Edmund. The Fowre Hymnes and Mutabilitie Cantos
Pernette du Guillet. Rymes
Wroth, Lady Mary. Pamphilia to Amphilanthus.
Vittoria Colonna. Sonnets for Michelangelo.
 
There are good English translations of the Italian and French texts:
Tullia d'Aragona, Dialogue on the Infinity of Love, ed. and trans. Rinaldina Russell and Bruce Merry, introd. and notes Rinaldina Russell (1997)
 
Vittoria Colonna, Sonnets for Michelangelo. A Bilingual Edition, ed. and trans. Abigail Brundin (2005)
 
Pernette du Guillet. Complete Poems: A Bilingual Edition. Ed., Karen Simroth James. Trans. Marta Rijn Finch (2010). 


CL 84000 Memory, Political Thought and Italian Destiny in the Works of Foscolo and Leopardi
Prof. Morena Corradi Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [36062]
Foscolo and Leopardi are among the most prominent literary figures who passionately addressed the social and political questions vexing their homeland in the 19th century. Their distress and indignation for Italy’s moral and political situation inevitably affected both their poetics and their interpretation of the role of poetry within society.

The course will focus on the works of the two authors which better express their views as well as hopes with regard to the Italian nation, its customs, and its destiny. While addressing the peculiarities of Italian Romanticism as expressed in some of the best examples of patriotic literature, we will trace the trajectories of the two authors’ political thought and its relations to the Italian national character. Particular attention will be given to the function of poetry in recollecting as well as enhancing memory. Our analysis and discussion of Foscolo’s and Leopardi’s oeuvres will be conducted in the light of their most relevant historical, philosophical, and biographical sources.


CL 85000 Lyric, Prose, Modernity
Prof. Joshua Wilner Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [36065]
In one of Baudelaire’s late prose poems, a poet tells of losing his halo while dodging traffic on a crowded boulevard: “It slipped from my head into the mire of the pavement, and I didn’t have the courage to pick it up - better to lose my insignia than to break my bones.” In this allegorical sketch, Baudelaire propels the desanctified language of the lyric poet into the busy, crowded world of prose.

The cultural condition Baudelaire evokes and its connection with a changing sense of the relationship between poetry and prose will be the subject of this course. We will begin by examining a group of romantic texts (some pages from Rousseau’s Reveries, some fragments by Schlegel, the debate over “poetic diction” between Wordsworth and Coleridge) which more or less directly challenge neo-classical genre theory and adumbrate formal possibilities which will emerge more distinctly over the course of the century. We will then turn to another group of romantic texts, including writings by Dorothy Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Mary Shelley, to study the gender sub-text which informs this history:  a sub-text in which the figure of poetic election is male and the matrix of prose female. Thomas De Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, which was a self-conscious experiment in “impassioned prose,” and the prose poems of Baudelaire’s Paris Spleen, a number of which are directly influenced by De Quincey, are at the historical center of the course. These writings will provide a bridge between the romantic writers with whom we began and the late nineteenth and early twentieth century writers of experimental prose with whom we will conclude, among them Rimbaud, Stein, Woolf, and Benjamin.

Requirements: 4 credits – a weekly reading journal, informal class presentations, a term paper; 2 credits – a weekly reading journal.


CL 85000 Neapolitan Narratives from Ferrante to Gomorra: Literature, Cinema, Television
Prof. Giancarlo Lombardi Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [36067]
Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan tetralogy shined a spotlight on an Italian city which had long exercised the imagination of philosophers, literati and visual artists. Called by Walter Benjamin a porous city for its theatrical architecture and for its ‘inexhaustible law of life’, Naples is not merely setting but protagonist in recent literary, cinematic, and televisual texts. Starting from the critical reflections of Benjamin, Antonio Gramsci and Franco Cassano, this course will discuss the complex portrayal of contemporary Naples in three different modules: the first will center exclusively on Elena Ferrante’s entire literary production, while the second will analyze the cinematic works of a group of directors known as Scuola Napoletana (Mario Martone, Pappi Corsicato, Antonio Capuano, and Antonietta De Lillo). The seminar will conclude with a module that will focus on Roberto Saviano’s Gomorra and on its adaptations: Matteo Garrone’s film and the SKY Italia series Gomorra La Serie. The course will be conducted in English.


CL 89100 Literary Theory & Criticism I
Prof. Martin Elsky Mondays 4:15-6:15 [36063]
A study of the major statements in literary theory during the classical, medieval, and early modern periods, the course will focus on issues related to the nature of literary representation and transmission. As much of the course deals with the absorption of ideas by one culture from another and the migration of texts from one linguistic, geographical and religious center to another, we will introduce translation theory and histoire croissé as methods. Topics will include the various ways the following have traveled from setting to another from period to period: mimesis and imitation; literary truth and beauty; genre and structure; figurative language; affectivity. Classical readings will include Plato, Aristotle, and Horace; medieval readings will include Augustine and Dante; early modern readings will include Valla, Tasso, Sidney, and Milton. Course requirements: oral report and seminar paper.


ENGL 84500 Disaffection in Colonial Law and Literature
Prof. Tanya Agathocleous Fridays 11:45-1:45 [36088]
In 1890, in response to a burgeoning print culture and steadily increasing criticism of imperial policies, the colonial government in India began to prosecute writers, editors and publishers for sedition. In order to broaden the scope of existing sedition law, prosecutors made the term “disaffection” central to their arguments; any negative affect aimed at the government might thus be deemed illegal. This course will use the criminalization of negative affect as a tactic of press censorship as the occasion to investigate the relationship between affect, politics, and the imperial public sphere. What effect did the prosecution of “disaffected” speech have on journalism and literary production in late nineteenth and early twentieth century India? On the idea of critique? On the form and content of public writing? How did the differential application of British law in India help to shape debates about empire, free speech, and the role of the critic in Britain? We will also consider the ways in which affect remains central to the constitution of publics and counterpublics today and the changing valences of disaffection in political discourse. As well as writing from colonial periodicals, primary readings may include Mulk Raj Anand, Arthur Conan Doyle, Sarah Jeannette Duncan, E.M. Forster, M.K. Gandhi, Sarojini Naidu, Rabindranath Tagore, Oscar Wilde; secondary readings may include Sara Ahmed, Homi Bhabha, Lauren Berlant, Wendy Brown, Deborah Gould, Ashis Nandy, Sianne Ngai, Jacques Ranciere, Peter Sloterdijk.  



ENGL 76200 Identities
Prof. Meena Alexander Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [36089]
"No one ever told us we had to study our lives, make of our lives a study..." writes Adrienne Rich in her poem "Transcendental Etude'". Through selected postcolonial and feminist texts of poetry and prose we will examine the splintering and refashioning of identities, migrant memories, desire and sexuality, embodiment and dislocation. We will study what Derek Walcott in Omeros calls the `radiant affliction’ of language and with it the complications of  self inscription in the face of a fluid world. Questions emerge, how are archives shaped over time through autobiographical acts? What connections exist between lyric time and the time of history? And what of migration—how are new geographies illuminated, selves created?

We will study the poetry and prose of Derek Walcott, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde and Kamala Das. Das evoked her body in ways that startled her readers – she composed poetry in English and prose in Malayalam her mother tongue. We will turn to other writings from the Indian subcontinent including M.K. Gandhi’s classic text An  Autobiography-- the Story of My Experiments with Truth, a groundbreaking text where confronting the violence of race laws, both in India and in South Africa, Gandhi struggled to remake both himself and the world. We will also read Theresa Cha’s Dictee, a long experimental poem that focuses on exile and dislocation, impossible identities, multiple languages and the failure of translation. Other readings will be uploaded on the dropbox, drawing on drawing on phenomenology, feminism, affect and postcolonial theories (Arondekar, Berlant,  Bhabha, Cesaire, Fanon, Merleau-Ponty, Spivak, Taylor, Weheliye, Wynter etc). The course will run as a seminar with weekly readings, students presentations and a final term paper.



ENGL 86600 “The Poorer Nations”: Postcolonial Theory and World System
Prof. Peter Hitchcock Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [36092]
This course has two major aims: first, to introduce some of the key contributions to the emergence of postcolonial theory in the writings of Fanon, Cesaire, James, Said, Spivak, and Bhabha (these might be expressed as a “core”); second, to register and explore thought that both extends and deepens this rich tradition and to come to terms with contemporary theory that in some measure breaks with the founding principles of postcolonial knowledge in the current conjuncture, including Mbembe, Cheah, Lazarus, Prashad, Scott, and Bonilla (these might be articulated as a “periphery”). The idea is to present both an appreciation of pivotal postcolonial theoretical texts and to provide some research avenues into the ways in which postcolonial analysis is being reconceptualized. In a sense, it is the limits of the core/periphery model (a mainstay of world systems theory, particularly in Wallerstein) that yet reveals an alternative matrix for inquiry. The “poorer nations,” borrowed from Prashad, is a way to mark the combined and uneven developments within modernity and to think alternative modes of polity and solidarity than those offered by West/rest binaries (another work by Prashad, The Darker Nations, will also be used to deconstruct in this manner). Postcolonial theory has been marked not by evolution but by involution, a process that finds the far away a good deal closer than traditional geopolitics and mapping would permit. This is the challenge of thinking postcolonial theory in relation to history and politics, but it also underlines new interpretive possibilities in the face of gestural “endism” (the end of history, the end of colonialism, the end of communism and, of course, the end of postcolonialism itself). How is postcolonialism defined by the fate of nation as a concept? Does postcolonialism linger because colonialism haunts? What elements of criticism characterize a postcolonial methodology today? Do these influence, and are they influenced by other critical approaches? In literary studies, how useful is it to speak of postcolonial genres?   Does world literature supersede what we understand of postcolonial writing? These and other questions will set the scene for our discussions. We will also take up some specific examples of contemporary literature to help ground our dialogue.

A class presentation and term paper are required.



ENGL 79020 Writing with an Attitude: Navigating/Negotiating Voices within Critical Experimental Writing
Prof. Mark McBeth Mondays 4:15-6:15 [36095]
I have long struggled to link individual stories to larger histories, to make tangible with words those points of connection between self and the world that often seem so difficult to grasp. 
--Alisse Waterston, My Father's Wars, xvii.

 … to be human is to be concerned with meaning, to desire meaning. … Without desire, there is no real motivated question.  As in the case of a love I desire, it makes me go back time and again to seek its meaning.  
--Max van Manen, Researching Lived Experience, 79

Being in love with writing, with language, with one's own movement into writing.
--Nancy Miller, Getting Personal, 8.

Academic writing often prescribes stringent parameters of tenor and voice according to its traditions, its disciplines, and its genres.  Student writers must often understand these “rules” intuitively because instructors teach them tacitly. As a result, our usage and teaching of language delves into privilege, politics, and "politeness." Yet, increasingly, the intellectual labor and the means by which authors express their ideas take on alternative forms through the integration of multiple genres, the textures of language, and the usage of multimodal technology.  Contemporary meaning-making then relies upon a variety of semiotic systems and capabilities that writers must learn, practice, and apply.  In this course, we investigate and analyze these conventions, yet also explore how contemporary writers push the boundaries of their intellectual work and creative expression: how they integrate multiple talents and sensibilities into the act of composing for particular audiences and rhetorical situations.  

Participants in this seminar unpack how critical experimental writers achieve these new hybrid forms and then rehearse their own productions of the multivalent, multi-vocal, and multi-vernacular.  Writing in this course becomes an exercise in discovering what voices lie within us, what registers of prescriptive grammars “control” us, and how we navigate the complex negotiations of self-expression, identity, and collective exchange.  Additionally, we also consider how we, as instructors, impel students to explore the sense of self in their composing abilities through our pedagogical approaches. In this course, we collectively evaluate what we’ve been told about writing (and literacy), what audiences we want to reach with our writing, and how to communicate (and teach) in innovative ways. 

A Potential (Yet Not Fully Decided) Reading List:
Austin, J. L. How to Do Things with Words.

Bechdel, Allison. Fun Home.  

___. Are You My Mother?

Cicero.  Rhetorica ad herennium

Danberg, Robert.  Teaching Writing While Standing on One Foot

Elbow, Peter. "Being a Writer vs. Being an Academic: A Conflict in Goals"

Gee, James.  Literacy and Education.

Kynard, Carmen. "'I Want to Be African': In Search of a Black Radical Tradition/ African-American-Vernacularized Paradigm for 'Students' Right to Their Own Language,' Critical Literacy, and 'Class Politics'".

___.  "From Candy Girls to Cyber Sista-Cipher: Narrating Black Females' Color-Consciousness and Countersotries in and out of School."

McLuhan, Marshal.  Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man.  

Mavor, Carol. “Touching Netherplaces: Invisibility in the Photographs of Hannah Cullwick" in Pleasures Taken

Miller, Nancy K.  Getting Personal:  Feminist Occasions and Other Autobiographical Acts

Nelson, Maggie.  The Argonauts.

Ocejo, Richard.  "Sociology's Urban Explorers" in Ethnography and the City: Readings on Doing Urban Fieldwork

Ong, Walter J. Orality and Literacy. New York: Routledge, 1982/2012

Perl, Sondra and Schwartz, Mimi. Writing True: The Art and Craft of Creative Nonfiction

Pratt, Mary Louise. "Arts of the Contact Zone"

Preciado, Paul B (nee Beatriz).  Testo Junkie

Pritchard, Eric Darnell.  Fashioning Lives: Black Queers and the Politics of Literacy.  

Schatz, Kate and Stahl, Miriam Klein.  Rad American Women A-Z.  

Sedgwick, Eve  “Teaching Experimental Critical Writing" in The Ends of Performance (Ed. J. Lane Phelan)

Shipka, Jody.  Toward a Composition Made Whole. Togorvnick,  “Experimental Critical Writing”

Sousanis, Nick. Unflattening.

 Trimbur, Lucia.  "Tough Love: Mediation and Articulation in the Urban Boxing Gym" in Ethnograph and the City

Waterston, Alisse, My Father’s Wars: Migration, Memory, and the Violence of a Century

Young, Vershawn Ashanti. "Should Writers Use They Own English?"

___. "Your Average Nigga"

van Manen, Max.  Researching Lived Experience: Human Science for an Action Sensitive Pedagogy

Vygotsky, L. S. Mind in Society: The Development of Higher Psychological Processes.



ENGL 75500 Readings in African American Literary and Cultural Criticism
Prof. Robert Reid-Pharr Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [36099]
 

This seminar will introduce students to some of the more significant recent critical and theoretical trends within the study of African American literature and culture. Participants will be asked both if it is possible to produce a specifically black literary and cultural criticism and whether Black American identity is manipulated, challenged or perhaps even erased within “peculiar” aesthetic, performative, spatial, theoretical, or political contexts. At the same time, the course will examine how African American Studies intersects with and challenges Feminist Studies, Gay and Lesbian Studies, Ethnic Studies, and American Studies. Students will be asked to write several short papers during the course of the semester. They will also do at least one in class presentation. Works we will read include: Christina Sharpe, In the Wake: On Blackness and Being. 2016; Philip Brian Harper, Abstractionist Aesthetics: Artistic Form and Social Critique in African American Culture. 2015; Aida Levy-Hussen, How to Read African American Literature: Post-Civil Rights Fiction and the Task of Interpretation. 2016; Kevin Quashie, The Sovereignty of Quiet: Beyond Resistance in Black Culture. 2012; Jeremy Glick, The Black Radical Tragic: Performance, Aesthetics, and the Unfinished Haitian Revolution. 2016; Mary Helen Washington, The Other Blacklist: The African American Literary and Cultural Left of the 1950s. 2015; William J. Maxwell, F.B. Eyes: How J. Edgar Hoover's Ghostreaders Framed African American Literature. 2015; Erica R. Edwards, Charisma and the Fictions of Black Leadership. 2012; Nicole Fleetwood, On Racial Icons: Blackness and the Public Imagination. 2015; and Andre Carrington, Speculative Blackness: The Future of Race in Science Fiction. 2016.


 
ENGL 83500 Romanticism and Revolution: Literature, Philosophy and the Politics of Terror

Prof. Nancy Yousef Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [36103]
With the radical convulsion and trauma of the French Revolution as a focal point, this course will serve as an introduction to issues, texts, and controversies central to the Romantic period. We will pay particular attention to rapidly shifting cultural moods of the era: progressive optimism, idealism, disillusionment, reaction, paranoia, and anxiety. Interrogation of the foundations and possibilities of community (social contract, civil rights, conjugal and filial bonds) is pervasive in the period, both in speculative theory and in affectively charged literary writing.  The course will be divided into three parts, beginning with the intellectual and cultural background of the French Revolution and its immediate impact in England.  We will trace conflicting and anguished reactions to the rapid devolution of revolutionary promise and the reign of terror in France, political repression in England, and the onset of war during the 1790’s. The aspirations, challenges, and disappointments associated with the Revolution continued to exercise an influence on the work of important writers whose careers extended into the nineteenth century. The latter part of this course will explore how political and ethical questions become recast and reshaped in new aesthetic practices and through the emergence of aesthetics itself as a field of philosophical investigation. Authors to be studied will include Rousseau, Burke, Wollstonecraft, Kant, Godwin, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Percy Bysshe and Mary Shelley, Keats, and Austen. Recent theoretical approaches will be addressed throughout, as well as the long critical tradition that has made romanticism so contested a period of study. Course requirements: short weekly response papers, one oral presentation on a theoretical or historical topic relevant to the week's reading, and a final 20-25 page paper. Students may consult with me on assignments appropriate for the portfolio exam.


FREN 70500 Writing The Self: From Confession to Life Writing
Prof. Domna C. Stanton Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [36085]

How is the self-written, constructed? What forms and shapes does this writing take over time, in different genres, and what purposes does it serve, for the several selves inscribed in the text and for others (including the self) who will read it. This course will begin by tracing self-writing from the Middle Ages to today, in primary and theoretical texts, beginning with confession (St Augustine, Rousseau); then early-modern memoirs and discursive forms of interiority (Abbé de Choisy); and steadily enlarging both the scope of self-writing and the figures of the self. We will consider the long passage that women's autogynography and the self-writing of persons of color and other others took to be recognized -- from Julian of Norwich and Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz; to slave narratives (Harriet Jacobs; Douglass); and letters, diaries and journals (Virginia Woolf, Anais Nin, Simone de Beauvoir). Our readings will culminate with the proliferation of forms in the twentieth century:  from holocaust memorials and trauma narratives (Primo Levi); testimonials (Rigoberta Manchu); human rights narratives (Dongala; Beah), AIDS memoirs (Arenas, Guibert, ) and transgender  texts (Bornstein, Stryker ) that highlight transformations and rebirth. We will end by considering what the continued obsession with revealing/inscribing the selves might mean (N. Miller; J. Leonard; M. Nelson); and finally, whether, as auto-fiction implies,  all writing is self-writing?

Work for the course: Whether the course is taken for 2, 3, or 4 credits, all students will be reponsible for doing the readings closely  and for engaging consistently in class discussion.
a Students who take the course for 2 credits will present in class a reading of one primary text, which will also be submitted in writing (c 5-7 pp); these students will also take the final exam.
b Students who take the course for 3 credits, will do all of the above and in addition, they will do a 10-13 page paper on a topic they select, after consultation with the instructor. They will also submit a thesis statement, a bibliography and an outline and the introduction (the schedule will be indicated on the syllabus).
c Students who take the course for 4 credits will do all of the above, and will also do a 20-25 page paper on a topic they select, after consultation with the instructor; they will also submit a thesis statement, a bibliography and an outline, and an introduction (the schedule will be indicated on the syllabus).
Please contact Domna Stanton with any questions (dstanton112@yahoo.com).  Suggestions for readings are welcome especially for translation from languages other than French; the syllabus and texts will be posted on Blackboard by August 15, 2017.
 
Office Hours by appointment Tuesdays 3-4 and 6:30 to 7:30.

 
FREN 70700 Myth in French Literature and Film
Prof. Royal Brown Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [36086]

The course will focus first of all on the very phenomenon of myth: how it relates to the cultures that produce it, and the ways in which it communicates. Various specific myths, such as the myth of Orpheus, will be examined, along with their manifestations in two films, Jean Cocteau’s Orphée (1950) and Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo (1958), which is based on a French novel, along with various other works found in French literature and film. The course will also focus on various contemporary theories of myth from writers such as Claude Lévi-Strauss, Roland Barthes, René Girard, and Mircea Éliade as well as on several non-French theorists such as Joseph Campbell and Carl-Gustav Jung. Works of French literature and film will be studied as illustrations of these theories.​
 

SPAN 70200 Spanish Literary Theory
Prof. Fernando Degiovanni Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [36174]
 
 
SPAN 85000 Contagious Affectivity: Body-Affect in Gombrowicz
Prof. Silvia Dapía Mondays 4:15-6:15 [36172]

In an interview Aernout Mik, a contemporary Dutch artist, internationally known for his installations and films, referring to his interest in Gombrowicz, says: “What appeals most strongly to me about Gombrowicz, and what became a very active force in my work is what might be called a ‘traveling’ from one object or person to the other through connections that are created almost by accident. This also happens in my work when the camera travels from body parts to objects and objects to other objects or when people assume each other's compulsive movements and emotions. There is an action of contamination or spreading out that becomes an independent force.” It is precisely this “contamination” or transmission of affect/emotion as it operates in Gombrowicz’s work that constitutes the subject of this course. In the first half of the course we will explore work in affect theory by Sara Ahmed, Lauren Berlant, Teresa Brennan, Gilles Deleuze, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Ruth Leys, Brian Massumi, William Ian Miller, Sianne Ngai, and Elspeth Probyn. In the second half we will discuss selected works by Gombrowicz such as Bacacay, Ferdydurke, Trans-Atlantyk, Pornographia, The Marriage. Particular attention will be given to the way in which his work performs nationalist emotions (such as patriotism), humiliation, shame, embarrassment, queer feelings, and disgust.
 
 
SPAN 87100 Mexican Narcoimaginaries: State Power & Cultural Mediations of the Drug Trade
Prof. Oswaldo Zavala Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 [36175] 

The present course will explore the political dimension of what is known as narco in the last two decades of cultural productions mediated by hegemonic discourses on organized crime. We will trace the recent history of literary works, cinema, television, conceptual art and music as they either reproduce or resist such hegemonic discourse on drug trafficking. For such a purpose, we will examine cultural objects produced in the 1990s and 2000s through an interdisciplinary theoretical framework drawing from the works of Pierre Bourdieu, Alain Badiou, Michel Foucault, Jacques Rancière, Carl Schmitt, Ernesto Laclau, Chantal Mouffe, Antonio Gramsci, and Antoine Compagnon, among others. We will incorporate as well the most updated work by key sociologists, journalists and literary critics studying the phenomenon of the drug trade, including Luis Astorga, Fernando Escalante Gonzalbo, Dawn Paley, Carlos Montemayor, Charles Bowden, Terrence Poppa and Gary Webb. Beyond the recurrent mythical aspects of narconarratives, we will approach the intersection of culture, state power, hegemonic discourses and the geopolitics of organized crime. This course will be conducted in Spanish. 


SPAN 87400 Jose Martí en dos mundos
Prof. Esther Allen Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [36179]

Which works are translated, why and how are they translated, and what is the impact of their translation? These questions thread through both the theoretical and practice-oriented branches of translation studies. This course focuses on the work of José Martí—canonical across Latin America but  yet to be widely accorded that status in the United States, where Martí spent most of his adult life—to address all three questions both theoretically and through the practice of translation. As a grounding in the rigorous exegetic and investigative skill translation demands, we begin with a collective translation of several of Martí's extraordinary crónicas, the documentary texts he published in newspapers across the Americas. We will also scrutinize Martí's own practice as a translator, of Victor Hugo's Mes fils and Helen Hunt Jackson's Ramona among other texts, as well as his writings about translation. And we'll assess the history of the translation of Martí's work into English and other languages.  The figure of Martí himself has also been subjected to intra-lingual, interlingual and intersemiotic translations, to adopt Jakobson's three categories, which have varied widely across historical periods and national and ideological contexts.  Viewed in the light of Bourdieu's notion of cultural capital, as elaborated by Pascale Casanova, Martí remains a paradox. Drawing on the analyses of Susana Rotker, Julio Ramos, Oscar Montero, Carlos Ripoll, Antonio José Ponte, Mauricio Font, Rafael Rojas, and others, this course integrates the study of a fundamental transnational figure with that of the transnational practice of translation. 
 

HIST 71200 The Intellectual Politics of the French Revolution
Prof. Helena Rosenblatt Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [36115]

This course is an in-depth introduction to the French Revolution and the heated debates it has engendered. We will privilege political/cultural/intellectual perspectives, focusing on the Revolution's relationship with "modernity" and its various ideologies (socialism, liberalism, totalitarianism, feminism, etc.) Scholarship on the French Revolution will be placed in historical and political context in an effort to answer the question: "what is at stake when scholars adopt certain methodologies and perspectives on the French Revolution?"

 
HIST 77950 Islamic rulership: the caliphate in theory and practice
Profs. Anna Akasoy and Chase Robinson Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [36112]

This class offers an introductory survey to Islamic political theory and practice. Readings and discussions will address origins and development of principal themes and institutions of the Islamic political tradition, including prophecy, caliphate, imamate, jihad, messianism, sharia, revivalism and modernism. We will be reading a combination of primary and secondary sources, including scripture, history, poetry, political theory, coins, and philosophical literature. Both Sunni and Shiite traditions will be covered. No background in Middle Eastern history required.

 
HIST 70900-Human Rights and Nation-States: A Global History
Prof. Eric Weitz Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [36111]

We live in a world of 195 independent, sovereign states. Virtually every one of them has a constitution that proclaims the rights of its citizens – even when those rights are only a veneer, below which the jailer, the torturer, the censor reign supreme. Only as members of particular nations do we become rights-bearing citizens; we never have rights simply as individuals, and global citizenship is rhetoric or ideal, not something that represents any kind of realistic possibility. Rights based in national (or racial) belonging are inherently limiting: only citizens may partake of the full panoply of rights, others are pushed to the margins, granted lesser rights or excluded altogether through policies like forced assimilation, ethnic cleansing, and, ultimately, genocide. The central questions that drive "Human Rights and Nation-States: A Global History" are:  Who, in fact, constitutes the nation, and by what criteria? And who, therefore, has the “right to have rights,” as Hannah Arendt, and, before her, the German Enlightenment philosopher Johann Gottlieb Fichte proclaimed? The course will combine theoretical and empirical readings and move to different cases around the globe from the late eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries to explore the entwined phenomena of nation-states and human rights and all their accompanying achievements, paradoxes, and disasters.
 

MUS 83500 (Ethno)Musicology and Social Theory
Prof. Jane Sugarman Wednesdays 10:00-1:00 [36143]

An introduction to some classic and contemporary schools of social thought that music scholars have drawn on in recent decades. Theoretical writings in sociology, anthropology, philosophy, history, cultural studies, feminist and postcolonial studies, and related fields will be paired with case studies that situate the creation, performance, circulation, and reception of music, and of sound more broadly, within the unfolding of societal processes.   Writings that have been of particular interest  to ethnomusicologists will be emphasized, but the case studies illustrating them will be drawn from all branches of music scholarship.  We will begin with Marxist and Marxian approaches, continue with structuralism and semiotics, interpretive anthropology, and poststructuralism, and conclude with a selection of topics of current interest.  Formal knowledge of music is helpful but not required.

 
MUS 88200 Musicology: Sound in Society
Prof. Eliot Bates Mondays 10:00-1:00[36148]

This seminar provides an introduction to the field of Sound Studies, including both the conceptual framework as well as practical techniques. We will begin with an overview of the field and its formation in 2004 through a consideration of the work of Trevor Pinch, Karin Bijsterveld and R Murray Schafer. Subsequent weeks will cover topics such as historical soundscapes, sounding the animal world, noise and silence in philosophy, the engineering of sound, sound and radio art, mobile listening, architectural acoustics, and synaesthesia research in cognitive psychology.

Assignments for Sound in Society include weekly reading notes, a final research essay, oral presentations on the readings, and a critical soundscape recording (based on recordings that you capture and edit).

 
MUS 86300 Musicology: Renaissance Musical Humanism
Prof. Chadwick Jenkins Mondays 2:00-5:00 [36146]

In some ways, the very notion of the “renaissance” as a descriptor for the period in music roughly spanning 1450-1600 is predicated on cultural movements collectively described as “humanism.” And yet there are several concerns that arise when applying either of these terms to music. If the Renaissance in general is a “rebirth” of concerns, aesthetic and ethical, deriving from Antiquity, then in what sense can that apply to music when the actual music of Antiquity remained terra incognita (and the only explicit attempts to recuperate something of the ancient style come at the very end of this period)? If musica moves from its medieval position in the quadrivium to some satellite position within the studia humanitatis, then what is gained and lost by that shift? Indeed, music occupies a fundamentally ambiguous position in Renaissance thought, partly because of the Renaissance’s continued efforts to reconcile Platonic and Aristotelian concepts.

This course will examine Renaissance musical humanism by taking a fairly broad look at musical scores, descriptions of musical practice, music-theoretical writings, and philosophies of music. We will focus on specific moments and repertoires that bring to light the richness and complexity of music’s relationship to Renaissance humanism. We will also concern ourselves with the various ways in which the Renaissance has been represented in historical writings (both musicological and outside of that field). Topics will include: Josquin and the humanists; Luther as humanist and the music of early Lutheranism; Music and the Renaissance individual; Ficino’s philosophies of music as well as Neo-Pythagoreanism more broadly; the French humanist tradition and musique mesurée à l’antique; Aristotelianism and Platonism in Renaissance music theory; the Petrarch project of the Madrigal and Bembism; the 1589 Intermedi as humanist projection; and the earliest formulations of opera as a simultaneous marker of proximity to and distance from the concerns of the ancients. Participants will be asked to submit short response papers every other week and the course will culminate in a more extended research paper.
 

PHIL 77600 The Philosophy of Literature
Prof. Noel Carroll Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [36205]

This course is a seminar in which we will survey the basic concepts in the philosophy of literature, including, among others, the very concept of literature itself, narrative, poetry, fiction, interpretation, metaphor, authorial intention, and the novel as well as the relation of literature to the emotions, theater, morality, politics, feminism, race and ethnicity and more, depending upon the interests of the students.  There are no prerequisites.  Students will be expected to make a class presentation and to produce a final paper. 

 
PHIL 76000 Mind, Matter, and Experience in Early Modern Philosophy
Prof. Catherine Wilson Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [36210]
Descartes proposed that the world that science investigates is purely corporeal, consisting of aggregates of corpuscles in motion obeying the laws of mechanics. Animal and human bodies, on his view, are machines. Human bodies alone are inhabited by minds that experience emotions and perceptions and that can innovate, grasp meanings and truths, and initiate movement, all in ways that cannot be scientifically understood. In this seminar, we will examine the reactions to this proposal, including a variety of extensions of, and alternatives to this basic scheme, in early modern philosophy. Topics will include: the materialisms of Gassendi and Locke, the animism of Margaret Cavendish, the phenomenalism or idealism of Leibniz and Malebranche, and the quasi-pantheistic systems of Spinoza and Newton.
 

PHIL 77900/PSC 80302 Socialism and Democracy
Prof. Carol Gould Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [36206]

An exploration of core issues at the intersection of socialist theory and democratic theory, and of the prospects for rethinking democratic socialism for the 21st century. The seminar will draw on literature from the history of both Marxist/socialist and liberal democratic thought and will go on to consider leading critiques of both traditions. We will then focus on key conceptual problems in delineating new democratic and cooperative forms of social, economic, and political organization, including worker self-management; structural injustice and ecological justice; the question of markets, coordination, and distribution; the problem of scale (local, national, and global); and the role of feminist notions of reproduction, recognition, and care. Readings will include, among others, works by Karl Marx, Rosa Luxemburg, Emma Goldman, Peter Kropotkin, Karl Kautsky, Hannah Arendt, Franz Fanon, Robert Dahl, C. B. Macpherson, Carole Pateman, Andre Gorz, Erik Olin Wright, Jane Mansbridge, G. A. Cohen, Nancy Fraser, and Elizabeth Anderson.

 
PHIL 76900/PSYC 80104 Philosophy of Social Science
Prof. John Greenwood Thursdays 9:30-11:30 [36214]

This course will focus on a number of philosophical and meta-theoretical questions concerning the nature of social phenomena and social scientific explanation. We will cover topics common to most social sciences, such as the debate between so-called holists and individualists, the nature of structural and functional forms of explanation; and the place of social values in social science. We will also cover topics specific to particular social scientific disciplines, such as problems associated with the anthropological understanding of alien cultures, the role of isolative experimentation in social psychology, the presumed autonomy of historical explanation, and the instrumentalist conception of theory in economics. We will also consider the historical evolution of the social sciences, including their institutional development in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
 
Throughout the course, a continuous attempt will be made to provide a general philosophical characterization of social phenomena. We will try to explicate what is held––by both lay and professional theorists––to be the ‘common characteristic(s)’ (Durkheim) of the varied phenomena classified as social in nature, such as social action, social cognition, social groups, social structures and the like, and the relations between them (but without presupposing that there is a single characteristic or set of characteristics common to them all).  It is hoped that the working analysis of social phenomena developed will enable us to get a better conceptual grip on the fundamental philosophical questions of social science. It will also hopefully shed some light on the pretensions of new disciplines such as sociobiology, social epistemology, social neuroscience, and evolutionary social psychology, and familiar but puzzling claims to the effect that our identities and emotions are socially constructed, and thus the appropriate subject of social scientific research.
 
Contemporary philosophy of social science is in an exciting state of flux, since many of its traditional guiding assumptions and contrasts, derived from logical positivist/scientific empiricist philosophy of science, have been abandoned or qualified in recent years. By returning to the core philosophical questions about social phenomena and social explanation, it is hoped that the course will be able to shed some fresh light upon traditional problems and debates, and to identify some emerging contemporary issues.
 
Social sciences considered will include sociology, anthropology, social psychology, political science, economics and history. No detailed background in social science is assumed, although any background would be an undoubted asset and a positive source of course enrichment.
 
Readings will be based upon book chapters and papers, which will be posted electronically. 
 
 
PSC 72100 American Political Thought
Prof. Ruth O’Brien Tuesdays 11:45-1:45 [36607]

American Political Thought is one of the core subfields in the American Politics field. It can also be counted as part of the political theory concentration. This seminar asks the big questions: What is justice? What is equality? What does it mean to be free? It does so in historical perspective, breaking the periods down into perspectives provided by the revolution; founding, civil war; Social Darwinist; bourgeois individualist; progressive; industrial capitalist, New Deal; and identity politics periods. Original texts ranging from: James Madison’s Federalist Papers; John Dewey’s The Public and Its Problems; Malcolm X’s Autobiography to Gloria E. Anzaldua’s This Bridge Called my Back will be read. In addition, to concentrating on the standard interpretations of these texts, some radical interpretations will be emphasized, particularly black feminist thought. In addition, the seminar gives more weight to the latter half of American political thought written about capitalism and identity politics in the late-19th and 20th centuries rather than the founding or the civil war eras in the 18th, early, and mid-19th centuries.

 
PSC 80302 Marxism
Prof. Jack Jacobs Mondays 2:00-4:00 [36244]

This course, which will be conducted as a seminar, will be devoted to discussing and critique the ideas of Karl Marx and some of the major thinkers who have been influenced by Marx. We will begin by exploring Marx’s analysis of alienation, his understanding of history, and his notions of the state and of class. We will turn next to discussing both Marxism in the era of the Second International, with particular attention to the Revisionist Debate between Eduard Bernstein and Rosa Luxemburg, and – on the 100th anniversary of the October Revolution of 1917! The political ideas of Vladimir Lenin. I intend, in a somewhat later section of the course, to devote particularly sustained attention to the development of Western Marxism, including the contributions of figures like Lukacs, Korsch, Horkheimer, Adorno, Benjamin, and Marcuse, many of whom attempted to explain why the revolution predicted by Marx had not (yet) taken place. Finally, we will end this course by examining Marxist thought in the latter portions of the 20th century, and the first years of the 21st. I expect that we will cover a work by Louis Althusser, and hope to discuss relevant portions of the thought of Slavoj Zizek. Throughout the semester, we will engage in a close examination of key texts, and will debate the extent to which the ideas we will discuss (and the controversies which they generated) can be explained by knowledge of the contexts in which they arose. We will also explore the degree to which the ideas of the thinkers whose works we will read help to illuminate contemporary issues.


PSC 80602 Walter Benjamin
Prof. Susan Buck-Morss Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [36250]

In-depth readings of a wide range of Walter Benjamin’s writings in historical-political context, from World War I and the Bolshevik Revolution, to World War II and the Vichy Regime. We will focus on philosophical method. What in his way of working escapes certain modern and post-modern dead-ends of theory? Excerpts from all 5 volumes of his Selected Works will be consulted.


PSC 70200 Modern Political Thought
Prof. Leonard Feldman Wednesdays 4:15-6:15 [36253]

This course will examine key texts of modern Western political thought and the different ways they have been interpreted by contemporary political theorists. We will concentrate on works by Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Mill and Nietzsche. Some questions that will guide us include: If the period we loosely and contentiously describe as modern places stress on the problem of value, how do modern political systems gain and maintain legitimacy? What particular institutions are justified and on what basis? What are the affective dimensions of political order and political disorder? How are visions of political subjectivity linked to political orders and who is excluded from political subjectivity? Does modernity signify an age of progress in terms of knowledge about the world and freedom for human beings or a new kind of violent containment?

In addition, we will engage two to three important contemporary readings of each primary text, coming from Straussian, Cambridge School, feminist, post-colonial and post-structuralist perspectives. The goals here are (a) to gain new insight into the primary texts under consideration, (b) develop a familiarity with the core assumptions, commitments and methods of key interpretive approaches, and (c) evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of those approaches. The primary texts will come from the department’s political theory reading list and the seminar will be useful for students in preparation for their comprehensive exams in political theory. But it is by no means limited to that goal or that group of students.


PSYC 74003 Historical and Theoretical Foundations of Critical Psychology
Prof. Susan Opotow Wednesdays 9:30-11:30 [36423]

This is a required course for all first year Critical Social/Personality students. We read and discuss materials that exemplify: (1) the link between the intellectual concerns of personality and social psychologists; (2) the need to approach human behavior through a variety of levels of analysis from the individual to organizational and societal levels, and (3) the importance of an
historical, theoretical, and critical approaches in to research. Students are introduced to classic and contemporary texts in critical social/personality psychology.

The course is designed so that students will:

·        Recognize the personal, cultural, political, and historical influences in the work we do
 
·        Be aware of the variety of theoretical approaches in the field and to develop personal strategies for working with and selecting among them
 
·        Understand how theory connects with diverse psychological methods and societal contexts
 
·        Develop a way of working in critical social/ personality that includes the use of historical and theoretical perspectives
 
·        Attend to the interplay among micro, meso, and macro levels of analysis
 
·        Be aware of the influence that physical and social contexts make to attitudes, beliefs, and behavior and, in turn, the influence of attitudes, beliefs, and behavior on these contexts.
 
To register, permission of the professor is required. Contact sopotow@jjay.cuny.edu for permission to enroll.


PSYC 80103 The Study of Lives
Prof. Jason VanOra Mondays 4:15-6:15 [36430]

A course in the study of lives invites students to grapple with the uniqueness, challenges, and wisdoms of the individual person.  A number of readings spanning both the social sciences and humanities will introduce students to the following central ideas within this interdisciplinary field of study:
 
1)     Individual lives must be studied and understood within their larger social, cultural, and political contexts.  The study of one person often includes many, many others.

2)     One can study lives for the purpose of addressing a variety of research questions, illuminating the ways in which findings from large-scale research studies particularize within the life stories of individual persons, embracing individual complexity and distinctiveness, and learning more about the particular time and place within which an individual lived.

3)     The study of lives utilizes a variety of methods, which include interviewing, archival analyses, naturalistic and participant observation, and the narrative analysis of memoirs, biographies, and other life histories.
In addition to reading some seminal life studies, including those of people who contend with various forms of injustice and struggle, we will also reflect on the theories, methodologies, interpretive strategies, and ethical issues connected with the study of lives.  We will focus much of our energies this semester on the "doing" of the work as students sketch the life of another person and draw on these sketches to address a research question of interest.  

 
SOC 80000 Foucault, Bourdieu and Baudrillard:  Power, Culture and Social Change
Prof. Marnia Lazreg Mondays 4:15-6:15 [36219]

Like Michel Foucault, Pierre Bourdieu as well as Jean Baudrillard addressed issues pertaining to the transformations of French-qua-Western culture.  Yet they also sought, directly or indirectly, to distinguish their sociology from Foucault’s social philosophy.  In 1977 Jean Baudrillard wrote that Foucault’s conception of power is a “mythic discourse” rather than a discourse that purportedly reveals the truth about the nature of power relations.  In 1968, Bourdieu, a one-time former student of Foucault, turned Foucault’s question “What is an Author?”  into “How to read an Author.”  However, Baudrillard also shared with Foucault a rejection of the core concepts of Cartesian rationalism and a “poststructuralist” orientation, while Bourdieu intended to stake out a sociological perspective that incorporated a number of Foucault’s critical theoretical insights.  What historical, philosophical, political and biographical factors account for these French sociologists’ mixture of reticent admiration for, and skepticism about Foucault’s ideas and political engagements?  Did they resolve the ambiguities and antinomies present in Foucault’s theoretical orientation and methodology? To what extent sociology transforms or is transformed by Foucault’s social philosophy?

Using methods borrowed from the history of ideas as well as the sociology of knowledge, this course examines Bourdieu and Baudrillard’s efforts to build a critical sociology with practical applications for social change as they grapple with Foucault’s conceptual innovations. Special attention will be given to the meanings and articulations of key concepts and issues, including structure and event/history; language, rules and discourse; power and subjectivation; body, sex/sexuality and gender; biopolitics and liberalism; revolution and political spirituality; security/war and self-defense.  The course will further examine the concrete socio-political activities in which each author engaged as a result of his theoretical commitment.  
Although students are encouraged to read each author’s seminal works, special attention will be given to Foucault’s Lectures at the College de France in addition to the Order of Things, and Madness and Civilization; Bourdieu’s Pascalian Meditations, Practical Reason, Acts of Resistance, and Masculine Domination; Baudrillard’s Seduction, Simulacra and Simulation, Symbolic Exchange and Death.

Students are expected to immerse themselves in the works of these authors, and write a paper focusing on three critical issues with which one of them grappled. Selecting current socio-political events or issues as testing ground for the three theorists’ ideas is also encouraged. The paper will be elaborated in stages to be discussed in class until its completion.

 
SOC 83101 Populism, Authoritarianism, and Dictatorship
Prof. John Torpey Tuesdays 2:00-4:00 [36225]

This course explores the nature of undemocratic regimes in the modern world.  We will explore different forms of non-democracy against the background of a growing expectation since the time of the democratic revolutions of the late 18th century that democracy should be the normal form of political regime.  In order to achieve our analytical objectives, we will read political and social theory, historical treatments of non-democratic regimes, and comparative assessments of contemporary undemocratic government.  The course should therefore be of interest to those in the political and social sciences and in history who wish to understand the variety and distinctiveness of undemocratic regimes in the modern period.

 
SOC 74600 Political Economy and Social Change
Prof. Roslyn Bologh Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [36231]

Political economy causes social changes that have major consequences for social life – including education, urban life, family life, immigration, ethnic and race relations, and gender relations as well as international relations.  The enormous success of Thomas Piketty’s book on income inequality, Capital in the Twenty First Century, and the cross-disciplinary, international, academic and lay interest and acclaim it has garnered, speak to the significance of political economy.  Part of the appeal of Piketty’s book lies in his emphatic rejection of the narrow economistic approach to questions of political economy that he encountered in the U.S. and his espousal, in its stead, of a more comprehensive, sociological, cultural and historical perspective – employing sources as unorthodox as Jane Austen’s novels! What are the changes that have occurred in political economy since the 1970s? How should we analyze these changes (sometimes conceived as globalization, financial capitalism, monopoly capitalism, neo-liberalism or post-industrial high tech and service economy) and their consequences for social life and politics today and in the coming years?  We will examine different analytic perspectives from Marx to contemporary critical theorists to see which one(s) seem most compelling. An aim of this course is for students (even beginning graduate students) to be able to develop a draft of a publishable article, research proposal or book prospectus.         

 
SOC 86800 Sociology of Culture
Prof. David Halle Mondays 6:30-8:30 [36222]

This course approaches the study of culture via innovative case studies and theoretical thinking. We examine empirically interesting case studies of different aspects of culture, and consider which cultural theories best help us understand each case study and whether, for each case study, new theories are appropriate. “Culture” is defined here both in the narrow sense as “the arts”—music, literature, journalism, film, television, art (painting, sculpture, etc.), architecture, dance, and so on—and more broadly to include political beliefs, social attitudes, and religious beliefs, and the Internet and social media. 
 
 
THEA 80200 Seminar in A Dramatic Genre: Critical Perspectives on U.S. Musical Theatre 
Prof. David Savran Tuesdays 1:00-4:00 [36191
]
Developed in the United States in the late nineteenth century, the Broadway musical has long been the most influential, adaptable, and category-defying theatrical form. This course will trace its genealogy and analyze its role in mediating between popular and elite cultures. We will pay special attention to the musical’s relationship to other genres and media, its role in consolidating U.S.-American identities, its seemingly magical power to thrill and enrapture, and its status as a lightning rod for anxieties swirling around cultural legitimation in the U.S. We will also consider musical theatre as a global practice, looking at its European connections in the early twentieth century and its status today as world theatre. The readings will focus on the history and historiography of the musical, from The Merry Widow(1907) and Show Boat (1927) to the works of Stephen Sondheim and Hamilton (2015), with critical analyses of music, text, performance, and reception. New scholarship—on the sociology of performance, orientalism, critical race theory, gender, and queer spectatorship—will be emphasized. The course will highlight musicals that have been particularly adept at challenging generic boundaries, including Lady in the Dark, Street Scene, South Pacific, West Side Story, and Sunday in the Park with George. Final grades will be determined by participation in seminar, three written reports, and a final paper.


THEA 80400 Seminar in Theatre Theory:  Extending Queer:  Theory and Performance/Theorizing Performance  
Prof. Sean Edgecomb Tuesdays 4:15-6:15 [36192]

This seminar presents a comprehensive and pluralist study of queer theory as it may be applied to critically analyze performance, both theatrical and lived.  Moreover, this course will consider queerness (as theory/identity, performance and way of being/doing) as it continues to develop in a global context. A deep engagement with text that is often dense, esoteric, and even contradictory will be essential. The course is divided into three sections: 1) First Wave: Foundations.  2) Second Wave: Expansions. 3) Globalization and Transexions. It begins with an investigation of queer theory through its post-Foucauldian origins, including the foundational theories of Butler, Sedgwick and Berlant and considers early queer performers from gay liberation onward. The second unit traces what Ann Pelligrini deems queer theory’s “affective turn,” considering the anti-identitarian and minoritarian work of key scholars including Muñoz, Freeman, Dolan and Halberstam.  Theatre and performance artists considered will be selected from contemporary North American locations and in regional contexts. The third unit of the course introduces a second wave of queer theory, focusing on a global approach to queer and trans performance that traces queer theory’s recent non-Anglophone developments in places such as Southeast Asia, France, the Balkans, Brazil, China, Australia, and beyond.  Artists selected will represent a wide and diverse group of LGBTQ perspectives in a global context. Final evaluation will be based on active class discussion, a 30-minute in-class oral presentation on an assigned topic and a final 20-page research paper on a preapproved queer artist (in terms determined in the seminar) that applies at least two of the theorists studied in class. Students will be encouraged to independently engage with queer performances taking place throughout NYC.


THEA 86000 Theatre and Society: Transatlantic Theatre and Performance: Golden Age Spain and Pre-Conquest/Colonial Latin America
Prof. Jean Graham-Jones Wednesdays 2:00-4:00 [36194]

This course focuses on theatre and performance produced in Spain and Latin America during, primarily, the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Rather than treating Latin America as a colonial extension of the Spanish-speaking metropolis, we will study the two regions through their nearly constant (albeit often conflicted) dialogue with each other. To do this we will discuss, apply, and critique the sociocultural, political, linguistic, literary, theatrical, and performance theories of coloniality. After a transatlantic introduction to the period, we will first look at theatre / performance practices in place in both regions before the arrival of the Spanish to the Americas and then proceed to an examination of Spain's "Golden Age" of theatre as well as colonial theatre and performance in Latin America. We will read autos sacramentales in addition to entremeses and comedias from both sides of the Atlantic; study accounts of Corpus Christi processions in Madrid and Cuzco in addition to reconstructions of pre-Hispanic performance-scripts in Meso-America and Canada; and seek out specific examples of cultural encounter, such as the translation of a Spanish evangelical drama into Nahuatl or a colonial loa intended for a madrileño audience. Among the authors whose texts we will study are Rojas, Lope de Rueda, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Calderón de la Barca, Cervantes, Ruiz de Alarcón, sor Marcela de San Félix, and sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Evaluation will be based on in-class participation, online Blackboard discussions, small-group activities, and a final research paper (15-20 pages).


U ED 72200 Using Multilogical Frameworks in Research on Emotions
Prof. Konstantinos Alexakos Thurdsays 4:15-6:15 [36320]

Through a bricolage of multiple conceptual frameworks (neuroscience, sociology, psychology, etc.)  and knowledge systems (Western and Eastern), this course will explore theories on emotions and doing research on emotions in teaching and learning. Topics will include both Western and Eastern understandings of emotions, emotional styles, laughter, radical listening, cogenerative dialogue, coteaching and the physiological expression of emotions. These will be investigated with a focus on identity, gender, sexuality, class, and race. In addition to providing a theoretical synthesis for such research and using examples from practice, we will develop designs and str ategies that could be used to research emotions and emotional climate such as the creation of heuristics.  Discussions will include how to carry out such research, methodologies, methods of data collection and analysis as well as emotional wellness issues and challenges.

Students are expected turn in weekly summaries of readings, and do several co-presentations. The final paper will be on a method/methodology and/or knowledge system of the student’s choice. 


U ED 75100 Authentic Inquiry in Urban Education
Prof. Kenneth Tobin Thursdays 6:30-8:30 [36321]

In this course we explore contingent and emergent methodologies that embrace learning from difference and use of multiple frameworks while seeking complex solutions to social problems. The approaches we study are grounded in multiple theoretical frameworks (i.e., they are multilogical); accepting polysemia, adopting practices that have the goal of social justice and beneficence for all participants. Research designs seek to produce new theory and transformative practices. We examine the ethics of doing research within critically subjective frameworks that employ multiple methods (e.g., narrative, video and audio analysis, auto ethnography, physiological expressions of emotion, interventions, cogenerative dialogue, heuristics, and co-teaching).

In ongoing fashion we critique published research in Urban Education, addressing ethical issues, crises of representation, and generalizability. Special attention is directed toward the salience of theoretical generalizability and user oriented criteria for critiquing the authenticity of research. Collaborative research methods are explored with a focus on reciprocal and supporting roles of all participants. Participants must be provided more than opportunities to be involved. Instead, what we learn from research must be used to benefit all participants, not only those who are well positioned to succeed. From the standpoint of equity, we will use theories with a critical orientation to examine labels (e.g., sexuality, religious affiliation, poverty) to ensure that both the design and enactment of research benefits all, including those who may not be well placed to “help themselves.”

Dissemination will be addressed with an emphasis on writing for publication in refereed journals, dealing with critical feedback, reviewing others’ work, and producing a manuscript style dissertation and/or book.
 
 
U ED 75100 Learning, Development, and Pedagogy: Sociocultural, Critical, and Dialectical Approaches
Prof. Anna Stetsenko Tuesdays 6:30-8:30 [36480]

This course concentrates on theories and research at the intersection of human development and learning with a focus on contemporary developments in this interdisciplinary area. Objectives include gaining an understanding of the major philosophies, theories, methodologies, and contexts of research on learning and development and how they shape various approaches to pedagogy.