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Fall 2019 Courses

Core Course: 
CTCP 71088 Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices
GC: Prof. John Brenkman, Wednesdays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm, 3 credits

Elective Courses:
ANTH 71700: Theoretical Approaches to Nature & Environment
GC: Mondays, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Melissa Checker
Cross-listed with Psych; this section open only to Anthropology students.

ANTH 72900: Critical Anthropologies of the US
GC: Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Ida Susser
Fulfills area course requirement for students in the Cultural subfield. Cross-listed with WSCP.

ANTH 81000: Perspectives on Life Histories: From Memory through Imagination to Narration
GC: Thursdays, 2:00-4:00 pm, Rm TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Vincent Crapanzano
Cross-listed with Comp Lit.
 
ANTH 81600: Race, Space, and Autonomy
GC: Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15 pm, Rm TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Christopher Loperena
Cross-listed with WSCP.

ANTH 81800: Reading the Grundrisse
GC: Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. David Harvey
Cross listed with EES.

ART 86010 [class section 56678] Modern Art & Mass Culture
Wednesdays, 9:30-11:30, Prof. Michael Lobel

ART 86020 [class section 56852] Postwar Painting
Wednesdays, 2:00-4:00, Prof. David Joselit

ART 89000 [class section 56875] Decolonizing Gender between Image and Text
Mondays, 4:15-6:15, Profs. Siona Wilson (Art History) & Tanya Agathocleous (English), cross-listed with ENG 80500

CLAS 71800 Thucydides, Politics, Philosophy
Prof. Jennifer Roberts, Thurs. 6:30-8:30 PM, 3 credits

CLAS 81100 Aristotle’s Rhetoric
Prof. Laura Viidebaum, Thurs. 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 credits
NYU, Silver Center, Room 503A

CL 79500 Comparative Literature in the Age of Globalization
GC: Tues, 2:00pm-4:00pm, 4 credits, Prof. Sonali Perera

CL 88400 Machiavelli and the Problem of Evil
GC: Tues, 6:30pm-8:30pm, 2,4 credits, Prof. Paul Oppenheimer

CL 89000 The Outcome of Classical German Philosophy: From Hegel-Adorno
GC: Mon, 6:30pm-8:30pm, 2,4 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin

CL 89100 History of Literary Theory & Criticism I
GC: Wed, 4:15-6:15pm, 4 credits, Prof. Paola Ureni

​ENGL 80500 Decolonizing Gender between Text and Image.[cross-listed with Art History].
Mondays 4:15PM - 6:15PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Tanya Agathocleous and Siona Wilson.

ENGL 80600 Il/liberal Aesthetics
Mondays 2:00PM - 4:00PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Kandice Chuh
 
ENGL 86600 Migrations and the Literary: Decolonizing Borders in Theory and Practice
Wednesdays 2:00PM - 4:00PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Peter Hitchcock

ENGL 76000 Aestheticism, Decadence, Modernism, 1880-1930
Tuesdays 6:30PM - 8:30PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Richard Kaye

ENGL 87400 The Essay Film
Wednesdays 4:15PM - 6:15PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Wayne Koestenbaum

ENGL 85500 Racial Hauntologies
Thursdays 4:15PM - 6:15PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Eric Lott

ENGL 89020 Queer Literacy and Its Discontents (or Discovering Oppressive Power Brokers of Education)
Mondays 4:15PM - 6:15PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Mark McBeth

ENGL 84200 Thinking in Pieces: Pascal, Dickinison, Wittgenstein
Tuesdays 11:45AM - 1:45PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof Joshua Wilner

FREN 79130: Contemporary Issue in Post-Colonial Sub-Sharan Francophone Literature and Film
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30, Prof. Nathalie Etoke, 2 or 4 Crédits

FREN 70500: Writing the Self: From Augustine to Selfies
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15, Distinguished Prof. Domna Stanton, 2 or 4 Credits

HIST 70310 Thucydides, Politics, Philosophy
Monday, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Jennifer Roberts, Crosslisted with Philosophy, Political Science and Classics

HIST 72400 The Outcome of German Classical Philosophy
Monday, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin

​HIST 72300 History and Theory II
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Samira Haj

​LING 76100 Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Monday, 2:00pm - 4:00pm, Prof. Cecelia Cutler

LING 70100: Introduction to Theoretical Linguistics
Tuesday, 4:15pm – 6:15pm
Prof. Christina Tortora (ctortora@gc.cuny.edu) & Jason Bishop (jbishop@gc.cuny.edu)

MUS 74500: Seminar in Theory/Analysis 1: Schenkerian Analysis 1
Monday, 10am -1pm, Prof. Poundie Burstein, Room 3491, 4 Credits

MUS 84100: Topic Theory: Analytical and Critical Issues
Wednesday, 10am- 1pm, Prof. Kofi Agawu, Room 3491, 3 Credits

MUS 83500: Seminar in Ethnomusicology: (Ethno)musicology and Social Theory
Wednesday, 10am -1pm, Prof. Jane Sugarman, Room 3389, 3 Credits [Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission]

MUS 84200: Current Trends in Music Theory
Thursday, 2pm-5pm, Prof. Joseph Straus, Room 3389, 3 Credits

MUS 86400: Seminar in Musicology: Sonic Rubble: Music after Urban Catastrophe
Tuesdays. 2pm-5pm, Prof. Abby Anderton, Room 3389, 3 Credits

PHIL 77600: Contemporary Problems in the Philosophy of Art
Tuesdays, 11:45 am-1:45 am, Room TBA, Prof. Carrol
 
PHIL 77000: Consciousness: Neuroscience and Philosophy
Thursdays, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm, Room TBA, Profs. Rosenthal and Ro

PHIL 76300: Marx and Marxism
Mondays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm, Room TBA, Prof. Mills

PHIL 76100: Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century: Kant and his Predecessors​
Mondays, 6:30 pm- 8:30 pm, Room TBA, Prof. Wilson

PSC 80304: Classics in Modern Philosophy
Wednesdays, 2:00pm–4:00pm. Prof. Uday Mehta, 4 Credits

PSC 80601: BioPolitics
Mondays, 2:00pm–4:00pm, Prof. Paisley Currah, 4 credits

PSC 80607: Beyond the Canon: Recent Trends in Political Theory
Mondays, 6:30pm–8:30pm, Prof. Susan Buck-Morss, 4 credits

PSC 71902: The Outcome of Classical German Philosophy
Mondays, 6:30pm–8:30pm, Prof. Richard Wolin, 3 credits

PSC 71903: Thucydides, Politics, Philosophy
Mondays, 6:30pm–8:30pm, Prof. Jennifer Roberts, 3 credits

THEA 80300: Seminar in Theatre Theory & Criticism: German Theatre/Theory
Tuesdays, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Professor David Savran
 
THEA 80300: Seminar in Theatre Theory & Criticism: Theorizing the Oceanic from Antony and Cleopatra to John Akomfrah’s Vertigo Sea
Wednesdays, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Professor Maurya Wickstrom

THEA 81600: Seminar in Film Theory: Theories of the Cinema
Cross listed with FSCP8100 African Film History and Theory, 1950-1990
Mondays, 4:15 p.m. – 8:15 p.m., Instructor Boukary Sawadogo

THEA 85700: Seminar in Contemporary Performance Theory and Technique
Cross listed with ART86040 Cage & Cunningham
Wednesday, 11:45-1:45 PM, Profs. Claire Bishop (Art History) and David Grubbs (Music)

SOC 73200: Gender & Globalization
Mondays, 2:00 PM- 4:00 PM, Prof. Eisenstein
 
SOC 70100: Development of Sociological Theory (Theory I)
Wednesdays, 6:30 PM -8:30 PM, Prof. Hammond

SPAN 70200: Critical Theory
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Silvia Dapía
 
SPAN 80100: Climate Change and Discursive Framing
GC: Tuesday, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Prof. José del Valle and Prof. David Lindo Atichati
 
SPAN 87100: Periodismo narrativo y ficción literaria en el México neoliberal: Políticas escriturales, estado de excepción y la industria cultural trasnacional
GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. Oswaldo Zavala

Course Descriptions: 
CTCP 71088 Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices
GC: Prof. John Brenkman, Wednesdays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm, 3 credits
 
Starting from the tension between Marx and Weber, the seminar will explore debates and developments that inform contemporary theory, focused around salient conflicts in social theory, philosophy, and aesthetics.

(1) How do conflicting paradigms of society as system (Luhmann), as norm-governed institutions (Habermas), as symbolic-institutional habitus and practices (Bourdieu), or as actor-networks (Latour) bear on interdisciplinary research? (2) How to conceptualize the artwork or literary text in its difference from other objects and practices, its immersion in institutions and social networks, its hermeneutical instability and variability, its relation to prevailing forms of “communication” (Heidegger, Deleuze, Luhmann, and others)? (3) How does the Anthropocene, as concept and actuality, open to new questioning  concepts of the human, nature, and technology (Chakrabarty, Agamben, Latour, Sloterdijk, Arendt, Žižek, and others)?

Texts: Garth and Mills (eds.), From Max Weber; Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, What Is Philosophy?; Martin Heidegger, Poetry, Language, Thought; Peter Sloterdijk, Terror from the Air. Excerpts and essays by Marx, Jürgen Habermas, Niklas Luhmann, Bruno Latour, Seyla Benhabib, Nancy Fraser, Giorgio Agamben, Graham Harman, Dipesh Chakrabarty, François Jullien, Sianne Ngai, and others will be provided via Blackboard.

ANTH 71700: Theoretical Approaches to Nature & Environment
GC: Mondays, 2:00 – 4:00 pm, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Melissa Checker
Cross-listed with Psych; this section open only to Anthropology students.

ANTH 72900: Critical Anthropologies of the US
GC: Wednesdays, 4:15 – 6:15pm, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Ida Susser
Fulfills area course requirement for students in the Cultural subfield. Cross-listed with WSCP.

ANTH 81000: Perspectives on Life Histories: From Memory through Imagination to Narration
GC: Thursdays, 2:00-4:00 pm, Rm TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Vincent Crapanzano
Cross-listed with Comp Lit.
 
ANTH 81600: Race, Space, and Autonomy
GC: Thursdays, 4:15 – 6:15 pm, Rm TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Christopher Loperena
Cross-listed with WSCP.

ANTH 81800: Reading the Grundrisse
GC: Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, Rm. TBA, 3 credits, Prof. David Harvey
Cross listed with EES.

ART 86010 [class section 56678] Modern Art & Mass Culture
Wednesdays, 9:30-11:30, Prof. Michael Lobel

While early critical approaches often framed vanguard artistic practice in opposition to the ostensibly facile forms of popular culture, the ongoing dialogue between the two has actually been central to the development and function of art in the modern age, prompting widespread debates about their relationship. This course will consider episodes in the interaction between art and popular culture from around 1850 to the present day, focusing on the thematics of classification, circulation, and transformation. Topics to be covered may include: Courbet and the burgeoning culture of publicity in the nineteenth century; developments in mass printing like wood engraving, halftone, and chromolithography; the Index of American Design in the 1930s; gender, craft, and fabrication; Latin American responses to Pop; and recent research on Warhol, the archive, and queer identity. We will attend to various theoretical approaches at the same time we consider how technique, materials, and medium are central to these discussions as well.

ART 86020 [class section 56852] Postwar Painting
Wednesdays, 2:00-4:00, Prof. David Joselit
 
This class will address major tendencies in painting worldwide between 1945 and the present. Emphasis will be placed on broadening the treatment of movements like Abstract Expressionism and Pop beyond Europe and the United States. Other practices, such as Concrete art whose practice was largely rooted in Latin America, will also be considered. Broad surveys of such movements will alternate with focused sessions on individual artists whose works may be seen in person in New York during the period of the course. Does not accept auditors.

ART 89000 [class section 56875] Decolonizing Gender between Image and Text
Mondays, 4:15-6:15, Profs. Siona Wilson (Art History) & Tanya Agathocleous (English), cross-listed with ENG 80500
 
The politics of colonial resistance and egalitarian feminism arose alongside each other and share an overlapping history and vocabulary. The notion of liberation is central to both and in its service the two movements have intersected, interrupted, aided and undermined each other. As feminist postcolonial theorists such as Lila Abu-Lughod and Gayatri Spivak have argued, colonialism has instrumentalized feminism and vice versa. We want to read the historical intersection of feminism and anti-colonialism through the relationship between image and text, with close attention to phenomena such as harem photography, political cartoons, photo albums, and instances of Third Cinema (e.g. The Battle of Algiers). Tracing a long durée from the colonial period to the present, the class will be divided into four sections.
Part 1, “Colonial Spectacle,” addresses the intersection of knowledge, display and fantasy in relation to Orientalism, World’s Fair exhibitions and political cartoons. Part 2, “Psychoanalysis, Sexology and Colonialism,” looks at the rise of psychoanalysis and sexology alongside colonial epistemologies and studies particular instances of clinical practice in the colonies (Frantz Fanon, Marcus Hirschfeld and Freud Free Clinics). Part 3, “Insurgency and the Veil,” takes up the role of women in anti-colonial struggles and the ongoing difficulties of attaining political agency when “woman” becomes the symbol of the postcolonial nation state. Part 4, “Sexual Citizenship,” addresses the relationship between sexuality and citizenship in a series of historical and contemporary examples including “pink washing” in Israel. The class is aimed at students with literary, art historical and historical training who seek to deepen their theoretical knowledge of postcolonial and feminist theory and develop new frameworks for analyzing the relationship between image and text.

CLAS 71800 Thucydides, Politics, Philosophy
Prof. Jennifer Roberts, Thurs. 6:30-8:30 PM, 3 credits
Graduate Center, Room TBA

This interdisciplinary course will be guided in part by the particular interests of the students who choose to enroll in it: historians, classicists, archaeologists, political scientists, philosophers.  Although there will be common readings, students are encouraged to pursue their own perspectives on Thucydides while at the same time coming to appreciate his relevance to other disciplines.  The text will be read in English, but I am happy to meet separately with students who would like to read selections in the original Greek.
 
A masterpiece of both narrative and analysis, Thucydides’ account of the war between the Athenian Empire and Peloponnesian League also merits study as a work of profound philosophical import.  The work of a man filled with a plangent sense of the sorrows of the human condition, Thucydides’ history offered a non-fiction counterpart to the tragic drama of his contemporaries Sophocles and Euripides. 
 
The father of political science, Thucydides has often been labeled the father of political realism.  We will explore in what ways this is and is not accurate.  Thucydides has been co-opted by one generation after another, on one continent after another, as a spokesman for its own society and identified as the one person who best understood the problems of the day.  From monarchists to republicans in Europe to 20th and 21st century American neoconservatives, his readers have proudly cited him in defense of their ideologies. Today students of international relations wring their hands over the newly dubbed menace, “the Thucydides trap,” a concept that draws parallels between the diplomatic situation that led up to the Peloponnesian War and America’s growing tensions with China.  Both Thucydides and his legacy will be the subjects of this course.

CLAS 81100 Aristotle’s Rhetoric
Prof. Laura Viidebaum, Thurs. 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 credits
NYU, Silver Center, Room 503A

Aristotle’s Rhetoric is a fascinating work that is as complex and influential as it is controversial. Despite unsolved questions about its actual composition and difficult afterlife, the Rhetoric continues to serve as the starting point for theoretical reflections on rhetoric, oratory and prose writing. In this course we will aim to get an overall idea of the Rhetoric and delve into questions about its language, composition, subject matter, and position within Aristotle’s corpus. We’ll think about the commentary tradition and will also look at the impact and afterlife of the Rhetoric, particularly in the way in which it has contributed to discussions about ancient emotions. We will read the work in the original Greek, though students should have a read through the whole of the Rhetoric in translation before the start of the semester. For the original, we’ll work with W. D. Ross’ edition of Aristotle’s Rhetoric (OCT, 1959). We’ll have weekly reading assignments, comprising of passages of the Rhetoric and relevant secondary literature, a midterm and a final assignment, which will highly likely be a summary effort to produce a commentary of Book 3 of the Rhetoric.

CL 79500 Comparative Literature in the Age of Globalization
GC: Tues, 2:00pm-4:00pm, 4 credits, Prof. Sonali Perera

As a range of comparatist scholars have noticed, Marx observes in the manifesto (of all unlikely places) that world literature “arises” as the by-product of exploitative, even imperialist, designs. Where world literature is defined narrowly as literature of global circulation, its market driven, cosmopolitan character might be deemed to be the happy accident of capital movement guided by its cultural and economic custodians. But what happens when we expand and complicate our frame of reference? What of other methods and models for conceiving/reconceiving world literature as literary internationalism? What concepts and ideologies of comparison derive from a theory of value in a global and unequal world? And how do we understand the relationship between comparative literature and world literature—as antagonistic or supplementary?
 
Since Marx’s thoughts on the subject, in recent years, literary theory scholars find themselves returning to consider the problems and possibilities of world literature. The past two decades have seen a surge of publications agitating for and against both a revitalized Weltliteratur and a newly re-tooled comparative literature. WReC (The Warwick Research Collective) proposes a new world-systems theory approach which conceives of world-literature (with a hyphen) as a “re-making of comparative literature after the multicultural debates and the disciplinary critique of Eurocentricism.” In a recent issue of the PMLA journal devoted to “Literature in the World,” Simon Gikandi keeps the question alive: “But if world literature takes us everywhere and nowhere, are we better off with comparative literature, a disciplinary formation driven by the idea that literatures can be studied in their distinctive languages, across national and linguistic boundaries, without abandoning the languages and grounds that gave rise to them?” And yet, if in minimal terms, the study of comparative literature is distinguished from that of world literature on the grounds that the former requires specialized knowledge of multiple languages whereas world literature is merely literature in translation and generally studied in English, do we agree with how this academic sub-division of labor is coded and institutionalized? What is at stake in constructing the difference between world literary approaches and comparative literature in this way? Is it the case, as has been argued, that the turn to world literature has prompted a new strain of scholarship in comparative literature?
 
In our class, we will engage with some of these questions, as we take the measure of the state of the field debates. Throughout our course, you are encouraged to consider how these debates might shape the way that we think of research and writing in literary studies today.
 
Simply put, then, this course offers us a chance to study the resurgence of world literature as an interpretive paradigm against and through the perspective of new scholarship on the theory and practice of comparative literature. While we will study touchstone texts (by Goethe, Marx, Heidegger, Arendt, Auerbach, Said, Cesaire, Moretti, Damrosch, Spivak, Federici, Amin), we will also familiarize ourselves with recent scholarship including works by Casanova, Apter, Melas, Lowe, Ahmed, Robbins, Moten, and WReC. We will ground our discussions by “applying” theory to literary works by Woolf, Manto, Devi, Coetzee, and Salih. If time permits, alongside selections from theory and literature, we may also read excerpts from one or two of the ACLA’s emblematic state of the discipline reports.
 
Course requirements: 1.) A 20 minute presentation on one or two of the weekly readings. 2.)  A 2 page prospectus for the final paper. 3) A 15-20 page final paper. 4.) Engaged class participation.

CL 88400 Machiavelli and the Problem of Evil
GC: Tues, 6:30pm-8:30pm, 2,4 credits, Prof. Paul Oppenheimer

Niccolò di Machiavelli (1469-1527) is not only recognized as the first modern political scientist, distinguished by his empirical approach to political and historical questions, but as the first and possibly foremost investigator of the role of treachery in politics as well as the problem of evil. This course examines along these lines his ideas about politics, history, Fortuna, destiny and chance, together with his influence on the history of drama (through his Mandragola), considering especially his The Prince, The Discourses, and assorted selections from other works. Machiavelli’s influence on philosophy, fiction, drama, and film will be taken up in terms of Shakespeare’s Richard III, Nietzsche, Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Pirandello’s Six Characters in Search of an Author, Riefenstahl’s film Triumph of the Will, and Orwell’s Animal Farm. The instructor’s biography, Machiavelli: A Life Beyond Ideology, is recommended but not required, as is his Evil and the Demonic: A New Theory of Monstrous Behavior. — One research paper, plus a brief in-class presentation. 

CL 89000 The Outcome of Classical German Philosophy: From Hegel-Adorno
GC: Mon, 6:30pm-8:30pm, 2,4 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin

In 1886, Friedrich Engels wrote a perfectly mediocre book, Ludwig Feuerbach and the Outcome of Classical German Philosophy, which nevertheless managed to raise a fascinating and important question that is still being debated today: how should we go about evaluating the legacy of German Idealism following the mid-nineteenth century breakdown of the Hegelian system? For Engels, the answer was relatively simple: the rightful heir of classical German philosophy was Marx’s doctrine of historical materialism. But, in truth, Engels’ response was merely one of many possible approaches. Nor would it be much of an exaggeration to claim that, in the twentieth-century, there is hardly a philosopher worth reading who has not sought to define him or herself via a confrontation with the legacy of Kant and Hegel.
 
Our approach to this very rich material will combine a reading of the canonical texts of German Idealism (e.g., Kant and Hegel) with a sustained and complementary focus on major twentieth-century thinkers who have sought to establish their originality via a critical reading of Hegel and his heirs: Alexandre Kojève, Georges Bataille, Jean Hyppolite, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Theodor Adorno, and Jürgen Habermas. But we will also seek acknowledge the importance of the contemporary North American Hegel renaissance, as exemplified by the work of philosophers such as Charles Taylor, Robert Pippin, Michael Forster, Terry Pinkard, and Allen Wood.
 
In his “Discourse on Language” Foucault warns us appositely that, “Truly to escape Hegel involves an exact appreciation of the price we have to pay to detach ourselves from him. It assumes that we are aware of the extent to which Hegel, insidiously perhaps, is close to us; it implies a knowledge that permits us to think against Hegel, of that which remains Hegelian. Thus we have to determine the extent to which our anti-Hegelianism is possibly one of his tricks directed against us, at the end of which he stands, motionless, waiting for us.” Foucault’s insightful caveat will, in many respects, function as our interpretive watchword as we seek to decode and reconstruct German Idealism and its innovative contemporary legacies.

CL 89100 History of Literary Theory & Criticism I
GC: Wed, 4:15-6:15pm, 4 credits, Prof. Paola Ureni

A study of the major statements in literary theory during the classical, medieval, and early modern periods, the course will focus on issues related to the nature of literary representation and transmission. As much of the course deals with the absorption of ideas by one culture from another and the migration of texts from one linguistic, geographical and religious center to another, we will introduce translation theory and histoire croissé as methods. Topics will include the various ways the following have traveled from setting to another from period to period: mimesis and imitation; literary truth and beauty; genre and structure; figurative language; affectivity. Classical readings will include Plato, Aristotle, and Horace; medieval readings will include Augustine and Dante; early modern readings will include Valla, Tasso, Sidney, and Milton. Course requirements: oral report and seminar paper.
 
ENGL 80500 Decolonizing Gender between Text and Image. [cross-listed with Art History].
Mondays 4:15PM - 6:15PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Tanya Agathocleous and Siona Wilson.
 
The politics of colonial resistance and egalitarian feminism arose alongside each other and share an overlapping history and vocabulary. The notion of liberation is central to both and in its service the two movements have intersected, interrupted, aided and undermined each other. As feminist postcolonial theorists such as Lila Abu-Lughod and Gayatri Spivak have argued, colonialism has instrumentalized feminism and vice versa. We want to read the historical intersection of feminism and anti-colonialism through the relationship between image and text, with close attention to phenomena such as harem photography, political cartoons, photo albums, and instances of Third Cinema (e.g. The Battle of Algiers). Tracing a long durée from the colonial period to the present, the class will be divided into four sections. Part 1, “Colonial Spectacle,” addresses the intersection of knowledge, display and fantasy in relation to Orientalism, World’s Fair exhibitions and political cartoons. Part 2, “Psychoanalysis, Sexology and Colonialism,” looks at the rise of psychoanalysis and sexology alongside colonial epistemologies and studies particular instances of clinical practice in the colonies (Frantz Fanon, Marcus Hirschfeld and Freud Free Clinics). Part 3, “Insurgency and the Veil,” takes up the role of women in anti-colonial struggles and the ongoing difficulties of attaining political agency when “woman” becomes the symbol of the postcolonial nation state. Part 4, “Sexual Citizenship,” addresses the relationship between sexuality and citizenship in a series of historical and contemporary examples including “pink washing” in Israel. The class is aimed at students with literary, art historical and historical training who seek to deepen their theoretical knowledge of postcolonial and feminist theory and develop new frameworks for analyzing the relationship between image and text.

ENGL 80600 Il/liberal Aesthetics
Mondays 2:00PM - 4:00PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Kandice Chuh
 
This course occasions the study of the relationship between politics and aesthetics.  How and with what effects is that relationship organized by and in service of the liberal-colonial-racial capitalist order that is modernity?  How and with what effects is that relationship elaborated in difference from that order?  We'll spend some time historicizing aesthetics but will emphasize throughout the aesthetic expressions and theorizations of politics and aesthetics emerging out of the intellectual and artistic-literary genealogies that are disidentified with the aesthetics of liberalism.  We'll attend to the role of aesthetic education, as well as those of pleasure and discomfort, as we collectively undertake consideration of the meaningfulness of thinking aesthetics and politics together.  Women of color feminism, queer of color critique, Black studies, ethnic studies, Native American studies, settler colonial and postcolonial critique, and performance studies, constellate to form the center of gravity of this course.  Students should expect a substantial reading load in addition to biweekly short writing assignments.  Students taking the class for 2 credits will fulfill the requirements of the course with those short assignments.  Students taking the class for 4 credits will submit a longer essay or equivalent project at semester's end.  Everyone is expected to be actively engaged and present throughout the course.

ENGL 86600 Migrations and the Literary: Decolonizing Borders in Theory and Practice
Wednesdays 2:00PM - 4:00PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Peter Hitchcock
 
In a lecture at the University of Cape Town in the early Nineties, Edward Said suggested "Our model for academic freedom should [therefore] be the migrant or traveler: for if, in the real world outside the academy, we must needs be ourselves and only ourselves, inside the academy we should be able to discover and travel among other selves, other identities, other varieties of the human adventure." Said's positioning here is complex and not unproblematic but refers simultaneously to his life and politics, to his sense of the world (for which he often used the terms "worldliness" or "circumstantiality"), and to his concern for an academy that had recently been berated by Allan Bloom. Said's understanding of the migrant, or "traveler," is certainly idiosyncratic, yet it opens up a pertinent and prescient argument not just about the place of the migrant in academe, but about the shifting borders of migrancy in the contemporary period. Rather than being an introduction to migration and migration studies (a huge area of research and contention, not least because 1 in 7 people on the planet are currently defined as migrants), this course will consider what Thomas Nail terms "the figure of the migrant," both as a narrative mode and as an eminently postcolonial problematic. Instead of reading the migrant as primarily imperialism and colonialism's signal effect, we will study migrant literature and theory as agential in their own right, as a set of racial, sexual, and gendered provocations about how we think through literary knowledge as decolonization. On the one hand, the salience of Gloria Anzaldua's elaboration of borderlands continues to pick away at any state identity that pivots on exclusion in the name of protection; on the other hand, the intensification of migratory movement, as refugee, as asylum seeker, as exile, as worker, extends her critique in new ways, and both literature and theory grapple with such dynamism. Using specific examples of writing, we will examine migration as an entangled logic of decolonization, one that offers critical terms within border crossing, interdisciplinarity, and aesthetic engagement.
 
The course will begin with some basic questions. What is migrant literature? Is it a theme, the writer's biography, a state of mind, a form of cultural capital? Are all borders decolonized by crossing them? What about internal migration in the othering of identity? Doesn't migrant literature homogenize as much as differentiate? What if the writer migrates from the norms of migrancy? And what of disciplinary border crossing in readings of the migrant? As we delve deeper into representative literature and theory throughout the term, should we think of genres of literary migration, rather than forms? What makes migrant literature count? Does migrant literature permit the undocumented to document? What does it say about the politics and poetics of translation, and of world literature in the current conjuncture? As you can tell, the course offers several research avenues, but in general the idea is to take migration literature and theory as an opening to postcolonial critique, and to an interdisciplinary understanding of the literary in the world system as such. Readings in literature and theory may include Fanon, Patel, Lowe, Said, Salih, Unnikrishnan, Deleuze, Federici, Sassen, Anzaldua, Benjamin, Luibheid, Bhabha, Mukherjee, Spivak, Farah, Nguyen, and Adichie.
 
ENGL 76000 Aestheticism, Decadence, Modernism, 1880-1930
Tuesdays 6:30PM - 8:30PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Richard Kaye
 
This class explores the relation between the aestheticist and decadent movements as well as their determination of modernist aesthetics. We will begin with late-nineteenth-century British, American, and French works by Hardy, Wilde, James, and Huysmans. The fin de siècle was a time of pervasive fears and fantasies dominated by such figures as the New Woman, the urban detective, the homosexual bachelor, the Anarchist, the Oriental, the overreaching colonialist, the self-preening aesthete, the vampire, and the femme fatale, the latter reaching an apotheosis in Wilde’s Salome. In the diverse writings of Pater, Olive Schreiner, Vernon Lee, and Wilde, aestheticism emerged as a theoretically coherent and varied movement absorbed in exquisite surfaces, tantalizing ambiguities, and useless artifice. For decadent writers and artists, scientific theories of “degeneration” could be recalibrated as erotically charged, non-teleological experiments, while Freud drew on “decadent” scenarios for his proto-modernist narratives dealing with hysteria and sexual disorder, preeminently in Dora: Fragment of a Case of Hysteria, Women writers, meanwhile, struggled to find a place within the male-defined coteries of aestheticism and decadence, a theme dramatized in Henry James’ tale “The Author of Beltraffio,,” narrated by a decadent acolyte, in which the aestheticist project must be sequestered from female readers, who can only misconstrue its aims as immoral. Yet there were also alliances between male decadents and feminist writers (Wilde promoted Schreiner’s novel The Story of an African Farm because of its bold challenge to realist conventions and depiction of colonialist malaise.)  In France, the woman writer Rachilde publishes Monsieur Venus (1884), a symbolist/decadent novella concerning a dominatrix noblewoman, Raoule, who gradually transforms her working-class lover Jacques into her mistress by emptying him of all his “masculine” traits.
 
In the class’s section part we will explore how the fin outlasted the siècle, maintaining an intense afterlife in the Anglo-American modernist writing of Yeats, James, Eliot, Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, and Djuna Barnes.  The morbidity, subjectivism, sexual experimentalism, and excesses of literary technique characteristic of 1890s sensibility foment modernist revisions that seek to repress their origins in decadent poetics. Wilde's Picture of Dorian Gray, with its hero who cannot "develop," inspires modernist counter-bildungsromanae. We consider Joyce’s Stephen Hero, an early version of Portrait of the Artist as Young Man, arguably a satire of aestheticism as well as a novel with an explicitly Paterian protagonist. The keenly observing, detached bachelor familiar from James also narrates Rilke’s lyrical The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge (arguably the first modernist novel) and that helps to form the paralyzed solitary consciousness of Eliot’s “Prufrock.” Arguably the narrator of Conrad’s Heart of Darkness adopts decadent techniques for his coiled narrative of colonial tragedy.  We will consider, too, Eliot’s absorption in the figure of the Jew as an emblem of a malevolent decadent cosmopolitanism versus Djuna Barnes’ depiction of the decadent Jew in her novel Nightwood as a more positively transformative cultural agent. Our class concludes with James’ The Golden Bowl, a novel of twinned adulteries that is one of James’ most topical, aesthetically difficult, and decadent works of fiction. Among the works we will read: Hardy, Jude the Obscure, Huysmans, Against Nature; Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Salome; Schreiner, Story of an African Farm; Freud, Dora: Analysis of a Fragment of a Case of Hysteria; Conrad, Heart of Darkness, Joyce, Stephen Hero, Yeats, Selected Poems; Lawrence, Selected Short Fiction; Eliot, Selected Poetry; James, The Golden Bowl; Barnes, Nightwood; Showalter, Elaine, ed., Daughters of Decadence.  We will read relevant critical and theoretical texts, including Walter Pater, “Conclusion” to The Renaissance; Arthur Symons, “The Decadent Movement in Literature”; Mario Praz, from The Romantic Agony; George Bataille, from Literature and Evil; Richard Ellmann, “The Uses of Decadence”; Richard Gilman, from Decadence: The Strange Life of an Epithet; Linda Dowling, “The Decadent and The New Woman”; Michael Riffaterre, “Decadent Paradoxes,” Leo Bersani, from The Culture of Redemption; Regenia Gagnier, “Individualism, Decadence, and Globalization,” Vincent Sherrry, from Decadence and the Reinvention of Modernism”; Matthew Potolsky, from The Decadent Republic of Letters.  A mid-term paper as well as a final paper that may be drawn from the mid-term essay. This class can be adapted to parts of the New Portfolio Examination.

ENGL 87400 The Essay Film
Wednesdays 4:15PM - 6:15PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Wayne Koestenbaum
 
This seminar offers a chance to delve into visual works that might be called “essay films.”  A perplexing category; a fruitful category; a pretext for flight, for immersion, and for an end to naysaying.  Critic Tim Corrigan argues that “although for many the notion of an essay film remains less than self-explanatory, this particular mode of filmmaking has become more and more recognized as not only a distinctive kind of filmmaking but also, I would insist, as the most vibrant and significant kind of filmmaking in the world today.” (Timothy Corrigan, The Essay Film:  From Montaigne, after Marker, Oxford U. Press, 2011.)  Artists studied will include such unclassifiables as Alain Resnais, Chris Marker, Agnès Varda, Werner Herzog, Marlon Riggs, Trinh T. Minh-ha, Isaac Julien, Jonas Mekas, and Ja’Tovia Gary, among many other possibilities.  We will read some theoretical texts about the literary essay and the essay film:  Georg Lukács, Theodor Adorno, André Bazin, Hito Steyerl, Laura Mulvey, Nora Alter, and others.  As an ancillary aim, the course will consider how essayistic modes of filmmaking cast light on the contemporary practice of the literary essay (Claudia Rankine, Anne Carson, and others).  Students will have the opportunity to write about essay films, and, if desired, to experiment with the making of an essay film.  No auditors.
 
ENGL 85500 Racial Hauntologies
Thursdays 4:15PM - 6:15PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Eric Lott
 
This course plays with Jacques Derrida’s coinage in Specters of Marx, ontology haunted by a pun on haunting, to propose a course of study or series of case studies in overdetermination itself: the ways racial formation suffuses and delimits other vectors of social dominance.  Race, articulation, and societies structured in dominance give us our marching orders as we examine revealing moments of revolutionary conflict from the U.S. Reconstruction period to the present.  We will take up theoretical coordinates, cultural dossiers, and textual instances of many kinds—forms and formations, bases and superstructures, sudden advances and lockdown retrenchments.  The course will require at least as much attention to social and political theory and debate (Karl Marx, W.E.B. Du Bois, V.N. Vološinov, Angela Davis, Saidiya Hartman, José Muñoz, Tavia Nyong’o, Joshua Clover) as to literary and cultural articulation (Abraham Lincoln, Lucy Parsons, Langston Hughes, Ornette Coleman, Samuel Delany, Arthur Jafa, Carrie Mae Weems, Princess Nokia) as we explore recombinant social formations, riots, strikes, crowds, parties, and utopias and the textual forms that arise from and address them.  Engagements with various kinds of social-activist-intellectual practice is an assumed and built-in aspect of the course.

ENGL 89020 Queer Literacy and Its Discontents (or Discovering Oppressive Power Brokers of Education)
Mondays 4:15PM - 6:15PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof. Mark McBeth
 
In this course, Queer Literacy, we will focus upon how literacy sponsorships played a role in the dynamic power play between heternormative/homophobic public discourses and queer subject formation,. In "Sponsors of Literacy," Deborah Brandt lists a group of "figures who turned up most typically in people’s memories of literacy learning: older relatives, teachers, priests, supervisors, military officers, editors, influential authors. [These sponsors of literacy,] as we ordinarily think of them, are powerful figures who bankroll events or smooth the way for initiates” (167, emphasis added). For Gay, Lesbian and Trans individuals who lived through the twentieth century, these prevalent figures of sponsorship-- who would presumably “smooth the way for initiates”--in fact, constrained the literacy of queer learners. Ellen Louise Hart has claimed that "the acts of reading and writing are acts of creation, not peripheral but essential to all education and all learning" and, moreover she adds, for LGBTQ students, who navigate through patriarchy, heterosexism, and homophobia, literacy often takes on special roles for their survival ("Literacy and the Lesbian/Gay Learner" 31). The adverse confluence of these societal forces--an intradependent set of discourses that reified each other--kept queer initiates in identificatory check under an unspoken platform of heteronormative literacy sponsorship so that for most of the twentieth century the Queer community could not gain an affirmative foothold of self-worth through the literate practices that normally allow for such growth and development.
 
While this course will focus its analytic attentions on heteronormative discourses and the counter-normative measures twentieth-century queers took to upend them, students could (in fact, should also) investigate the primary sources of public media, archival artifacts, and other “traceable” materials to discover how over-deterministic discourses shaped the literacy potentials/capabilities/futures of other marginalized communities.  Participants in this course will visit various archives and special collections around the city.
 
Potential Reading List
Brandt, Deborah.  “Sponsors of Literacy.”  College Composition and Communication 49.2 (May 1998): 165 -185.
Butler, Judith. Bodies That Matter: On the Discursive Limits of “Sex.”  New York, NY: Routledge, 1993.  
Foucault, Michel.  The History of Sexuality, Volume 1:  An Introduction.  New York, NY: Vintage Books, Random House, 1978/1990. Print.
Gee, James Paul.  Literacy and Education.  New York, NY: Routledge, 2015.
Hart, Ellen Louise.  “Literacy and the Lesbian/Gay Learner” The Lesbian in Front of the Classroom: Writings by Lesbian Teachers. (Eds. Sarah-Hope Parmeter and Irene Reti)  Santa Cruz, CA: HerBooks, 1988.  Print.
Minton, Henry L.  Departing from Deviance: A History of Homosexual Rights and Emancipatory Science in America.  Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2002.
Mortenen, Peter.  “The Work of Illiteracy in the Rhetorical Curriculum.”  Journal of Curriculum Studies 44.6 (2012): 761-786.
Pratt, Mary Louise.  “Arts of the Contact Zone” Profession.  (1991): 33040.
Pritchard, Eric Parnell.  Fashioning LIves: The Politics of Black Queer Literacy.  Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 2017.
Terry, Jennifer.  An American Obsession: Science, Medecine, and Homosexuality in Modern Society.  Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1999.
_____.  “Anxious Slippages between ‘Us’ and ‘Them’: A Brief History of the Scientific Sear for Homosexual Bodies.  Deviant Bodies (Ed. Urla, Jacqueline and Terry, Jennifer). Bloomington, IL: Indiana University Press, 1995. 129-169.
Warner, Michael.  Publics and Counterpublics.  Brooklyn, NY: Zone Books, 2002.
Wilder, Craig Steven. Ebony & Ivy.  New York, NY: Bloomsbury Press, 2013.

ENGL 84200 Thinking in Pieces: Pascal, Dickinison, Wittgenstein
Tuesdays 11:45AM - 1:45PM. 2/4 Credits, Prof Joshua Wilner
 
That the immediate historical and cultural contexts in which Pascal, Dickinson, and Wittgenstein wrote differed widely as did their intellectual and imaginative projects scarcely needs pointing out: Pascal was a mathematician turned religious controversialist in 17th Century France, Dickinson a reclusive 19th Century American poet, and Wittgenstein a Viennese 20th Century philosopher of language who lived much of his adult life in Cambridge. The obvious differences harbor numerous grounds of comparison, however: each lived in a period of acute historical crisis that was intensified in each case by some sense of spiritual crisis and personal asceticism. Each left as his or her primary legacy a posthumous collection of pieces of writing that both call for and resist being gathered into wholes; correlatively, the compositional methods of all three involved processes of assembling and reassembling those pieces of writing - Pascal's bundled pensées; Dickinson's similarly bundled "fascicles" of poems; the fragmentary remarks that Wittgenstein arranged and rearranged in different boxes and manuscripts. For each, the relationship of "inner experience" to the body, to language and to the other is a central question. Each writes and thinks in ways that draw on while radically concentrating the signifying power of everyday language. In each the mathematical imagination - comparing and manipulating quantities, working with proportions, performing calculations, undertaking proofs - plays a central role, though always in the service of demonstrating its limits. Each conducts an on-going dialogue between the voicing of belief and the voicing of doubt. In some cases, a pre-occupation may be shared by two writers that is not by a third: thus, for example, Christianity and the Bible are central to an understanding of Pascal and Dickinson but not (it would seem) of Wittgenstein; the nature of philosophy and scientific thinking are explicit questions for Pascal and Wittgenstein in ways that they are not for Dickinson; fantasies of mental privacy haunt Dickinson and Wittgenstein in ways they do not Pascal (or not as obsessively). In other cases, similar issues surface in each writer in a different way: how does Wittgenstein's emphasis on language-games, for example, relate to Dickinson's serious playing with language, or to Pascal's famous use of probability theory to argue for belief in God as "a good bet" or to his extended meditation on custom and "divertissement"?
 
Our aim in this course will be to familiarize ourselves with each writer on their own terms while also exploring some of the numerous points and areas of intersection among them, always through careful attention to individual pieces of writing.
 
Principle readings: Pascal's Pensées, the corpus of Dickinson's poetry, and Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations.

FREN 79130: Contemporary Issue in Post-Colonial Sub-Sharan Francophone Literature and Film
Thursdays, 6:30-8:30, Prof. Nathalie Etoke, 2 or 4 Crédits

2010 marked the 50 years of "African independences." This course explores various dimensions of the francophone post-colonial experience in Sub-Saharan Africa. We will reflect on the legacy of colonialism and current challenges facing former French colonies. We will also look at the interplay between colonial discourse, identity formation, decolonization, emigration and the failure of the post-colonial state.

FREN 70500: Writing the Self: From Augustine to Selfies
Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15, Distinguished Prof. Domna Stanton, 2 or 4 Credits

How is the self written, visualized, constructed? What different forms and shapes do such texts take over time, in different genres? What purposes do they serve, for the several selves inscribed in a text and for others (including the self) who will read it.This course will begin by examining several theoretical texts on writing the self (Lejeune, Smith, Derrida, Glissant, Stanton), then trace self-writing from the Middle Ages (Augustine, Kempe, Pisan) through the early-modern periods, focusing on both the global (travel narratives on conquest --Columbus, La Casas, Equiano), and on various forms (letter and diary, for instance) of gendered interiority (Cavendish, Gentileschi, Sévigné, Westover). Signal texts on post-Enlightenment confession and memoir (Rousseau, Sand) will be followed in the second half of the seminar by a more thematic approach to issues of modernity, including slavery and liberation always deferred (Jacobs, Douglass, Wright, Coates); modernism and the limits of experimentation (Woolf, Nin, Kafka, Cahun); autofiction (Colette, Joyce, Stein); dislocated, traumatized selves in wars and holocausts (de Beauvoir, Sartre, Anne Frank, Levi, Henson [comfort women]); testimonio, the indigenous (Hurston, Levi Strauss, Menchu) and human rights narratives (Eggers); and French post-structuralism and the psychoanalytic (Barthes, Kristeva, Cardinal, Louise Bourgeois, Lacan). Our last two seminars will lead to a discussion of contemporary inscriptions of sexual and medical bodies, featuring birthing, AIDS, cancer and transgender selves (Arenas, Guibert, Bornstein, Leonard, N.K. Miller), and end with digital/virtual self-writing and the selfie (Smith, Giroux, Nemer and Freeman). Throughout, we will consider what the enduring obsession with confessing/revealing/ concealing; constructing and deconstructing selves might mean; and finally, whether, at bottom, all writing is self-writing
 
Work for the course: Whether the course is taken for 2, 3 or 4 credits, all students will be responsible for doing the readings closely and for engaging consistently in class discussion.
a, Students who take the course for 2 credits will present in class a reading of one primary text, which will also be submitted in writing (c 5-7 pp); these students will also take the final exam.
b, Students who take the course for 3 credits, will do all of the above and in addition, they will do a 10-13 page paper on a topic they select, after consultation with the instructor. They will also submit a thesis statement, a bibliography and an outline, and the introduction (the schedule will be indicated on the syllabus).
c, Students who take the course for 4 credits will do all of the above, but will do a 20-25-page paper on a topic they select, after consultation with the instructor; they will also submit a thesis statement, a bibliography and an outline, and an introduction (the schedule will be indicated on the syllabus).
Please contact Domna Stanton with any questions (dstanton112@yahoo.com).
 
The syllabus and the course materials to be downloaded will be posted on Blackboard by August 15, 2017.
 
The class will be conducted in English; readings are in English and French; all French readings will be listed in the syllabus along with their translations.

HIST 70310 Thucydides, Politics, Philosophy
Monday, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Jennifer Roberts, Crosslisted with Philosophy, Political Science and Classics
 
This interdisciplinary course will be guided in part by the particular interests of the students who choose to enroll in it: historians, classicists, archaeologists, political scientists, philosophers.  Although there will be common readings, students are encouraged to pursue their own perspectives on Thucydides while at the same time coming to appreciate his relevance to other disciplines.  The text will be read in English, but I am happy to meet separately with students who would like to read selections in the original Greek.
 
A masterpiece of both narrative and analysis, Thucydides’ account of the war between the Athenian Empire and Peloponnesian League also merits study as a work of profound philosophical import.  The work of a man filled with a plangent sense of the sorrows of the human condition, Thucydides’ history offered a non-fiction counterpart to the tragic drama of his contemporaries Sophocles and Euripides.
 
The father of political science, Thucydides has often been labeled the father of political realism.  We will explore in what ways this is and is not accurate.  Thucydides has been co-opted by one generation after another, on one continent after another, as a spokesman for its own society and identified as the one person who best understood the problems of the day.  From monarchists to republicans in Europe to 20th and 21st century American neoconservatives, his readers have proudly cited him in defense of their ideologies. Today students of international relations wring their hands over the newly dubbed menace, “the Thucydides trap,” a concept that draws parallels between the diplomatic situation that led up to the Peloponnesian War and America’s growing tensions with China.  Both Thucydides and his legacy will be the subjects of this course.

HIST 72400 The Outcome of German Classical Philosophy
Monday, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin
 
            In 1886, Friedrich Engels wrote a perfectly mediocre book, Ludwig Feuerbach and the Outcome of Classical German Philosophy, which nevertheless managed to raise a fascinating and important question that is still being debated today: how should we go about evaluating the legacy of German Idealism following the mid-nineteenth century breakdown of the Hegelian system? For Engels, the answer was relatively simple: the rightful heir of classical German philosophy was Marx’s doctrine of historical materialism. But, in truth, Engels’ response was merely one of many possible approaches. Nor would it be much of an exaggeration to claim that, in the twentieth-century, there is hardly a philosopher worth reading who has not sought to define him or herself via a confrontation with the legacy of Kant and Hegel.
                Our approach to this very rich material will combine a reading of the canonical texts of German Idealism (e.g., Kant and Hegel) with a sustained and complementary focus on major twentieth-century thinkers who have sought to establish their originality via a critical reading of Hegel and his heirs: Alexandre Kojève, Georges Bataille, Jean Hyppolite, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Theodor Adorno, and Jürgen Habermas. But we will also seek acknowledge the importance of the contemporary North American Hegel renaissance, as exemplified by the work of philosophers such as Charles Taylor, Robert Pippin, Michael Forster, Terry Pinkard, and Allen Wood.
                In his “Discourse on Language” Foucault warns us appositely that, “Truly to escape Hegel involves an exact appreciation of the price we have to pay to detach ourselves from him. It assumes that we are aware of the extent to which Hegel, insidiously perhaps, is close to us; it implies a knowledge that permits us to think against Hegel, of that which remains Hegelian. Thus we have to determine the extent to which our anti-Hegelianism is possibly one of his tricks directed against us, at the end of which he stands, motionless, waiting for us.” Foucault’s insightful caveat will, in many respects, function as our interpretive watchword as we seek to decode and reconstruct German Idealism and its innovative contemporary legacies.

HIST 72300 History and Theory II
Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Samira Haj
 
The question of the relationship of theory to history is laden with problems. The objective of the seminar is to explore more deeply the theoretical and analytical concerns that have haunted historians since History established itself as a discipline. The course is de facto thematically-organized as well as interdisciplinary, which by implication means that it will be drawing on different bodies of knowledge, including philosophy, political theory, anthropology, gender and legal studies with possibly some written narratives and accounts drawn from the field of history itself.
 
This course is a follow-up of the first History and Theory seminar and is a continuation rather than a repeat. While it might cover similar themes in more depth, it will not repeat the reading material covered in the first seminar.  The course is therefore open to students that have already taken the first and to all other students interested in the topic.
 
Tentatively, the reading list might possibly include:
Reinhart Koselleck, Sediments of Time: On Possible Histories (2018).
Jacques Derrida, Specters of Marx.
Michel Foucault, The Hermeneutics of the Subject.
--------------------, On the Government of the Living.
Kerwin Lee Klein, From History to Theory, 2011.
David Scott, Refashioning Futures.
Colin Koopman, Genealogy as Critique.
Paul Ricoeur, Memory, History and Forgetting
Arnold Davidson, The Emergence of Sexuality.
 R.G. Collingwood, The Idea of History.
Colin Dayan, History, Haiti, and the Gods.
Walter Benjamin, Critique of Violence.

LING 76100 Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Monday, 2:00pm - 4:00pm, Prof. Cecelia Cutler (CECELIA.CUTLER@lehman.cuny.edu)
 
This course explores contemporary questions facing the field of sociolinguistics: What is the purpose of sociolinguistics? What theoretical and sociocultural questions does it address? What theories and new forms of data are sociolinguists analyzing in order to answer these questions? Should sociolinguists take an activist role in sharing their findings with the public? In seminar style discussions, participants will engage with these questions through a series of readings and develop a research paper (or student-devised project) based on data, theories, and methodologies discussed in class.
 
LING 70100: Introduction to Theoretical Linguistics
Tuesday, 4:15pm – 6:15pm
Prof. Christina Tortora (ctortora@gc.cuny.edu) & Jason Bishop (jbishop@gc.cuny.edu)

MUS 74500: Seminar in Theory/Analysis 1: Schenkerian Analysis 1
Monday, 10am -1pm, Prof. Poundie Burstein, Room 3491, 4 Credits

An introduction to the practice of Schenkerian analysis, including discussion of its notation,
terminology, and techniques. Assignments will involve intensive analyses of works and excerpts of works from the tonal repertoire, along with some readings from the scholarly literature. Students entering the class should have a strong background in harmony and counterpoint.

MUS 84100: Topic Theory: Analytical and Critical Issues
Wednesday, 10am- 1pm, Prof. Kofi Agawu, Room 3491, 3 Credits

Topic Theory is the outcome of a collective research enterprise in which notions of topic
(“subjects of musical discourse,” according to Leonard Ratner, the originator of modern topic
theory) shape the interpretation of individual works. Rejecting the ostensible neutrality of
musical material, topic theorists seek out sedimentations of style, history, pedagogy, convention and affect in music’s sounding forms and consider the syntactical implications of their piece-specific disposition. This seminar will explore some of the analytical and critical issues raised by topic theory. Readings will be drawn from the writings of Ratner, Allanbrook, Hatten, Sisman, Monelle and Mirka, among others. A substantial final essay on an aspect of topic theory will be required.

MUS 83500: Seminar in Ethnomusicology: (Ethno)musicology and Social Theory
Wednesday, 10am -1pm, Prof. Jane Sugarman, Room 3389, 3 Credits [Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission]

MUS 84200: Current Trends in Music Theory
Thursday, 2pm-5pm, Prof. Joseph Straus, Room 3389, 3 Credits

A survey of recent developments in the field of Music Theory. Topics may include
• transformation theory,
• neo-Riemannian theory,
• atonal voice leading,
• theoretical approaches to jazz, rock, pop, non-Western, and early music,
• theories of tonal form,
• topic theory,
• partimenti,
• chromatic harmony,
• race, gender, sexuality and disability,
• analysis and performance,
• perception and cognition.
The course will feature guest lectures from within and outside CUNY

MUS 86400: Seminar in Musicology: Sonic Rubble: Music after Urban Catastrophe
Tuesdays. 2pm-5pm, Prof. Abby Anderton, Room 3389, 3 Credits

Rubble is generally thought of as a material to be worked through, not as a catalyst for artistic
production. Yet recent scholarship on the aftermath of urban destruction—ranging from postwar Germany to the Syrian Civil War—has documented an array of contexts in which musical life continues in spite of, and sometimes even inspired by, physical devastation. These ruined cityscapes profoundly alter the way in which music is transmitted, received, and composed. This course will focus on the aftermaths of war and natural disaster in the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries, as we explore the relationships between the body, trauma, and postapocalyptic soundscapes. Through readings from Musicology and Sound Studies that focus on gender, race, class, and disability, we will listen at the links between music and rubble in various contexts including (but not limited to): post-industrial Detroit, post-earthquake Port-au-Prince, post-9/11 New York, atomic ruins, and the ruins of the Syrian Civil War.

PHIL 77600: Contemporary Problems in the Philosophy of Art
Tuesdays, 11:45 am-1:45 am, Room TBA, Prof. Carrol

Contemporary Problems in the Philosophy of Art begins with the discussion of recent answers to the question "What is art?" Some authors, among others, to be studied include Gary Iseminger, Dominic McIver Lopes, and Nick Zangwill. Relatedly, we will examine the nature of aesthetic experience and questions about the evaluation of art, including formalism and functionalism. Time permitting, we will explore the relations of the emotions and morality to art.
 
There are no course pre-requisites. Students are expected to participate in seminar discussions and to write a final paper. The aim of the course is to prepare students to publish in the area of contemporary aesthetics and to teach in it.
 
[Counts towards course satisfaction of Group C]

PHIL 77000: Consciousness: Neuroscience and Philosophy
Thursdays, 2:00 pm-4:00 pm, Room TBA, Profs. Rosenthal and Ro

The course will combine a focus on dominant theories of consciousness in the current literature in philosophy with an examination of a number of especially revealing neuroscientific and related experimental findings. A major goal will be to evaluate theories of consciousness by appeal to empirical findings. We will also keep in mind possible directions for fruitful research suggested by the interaction of current findings and theoretical explanations.
 
The discussion of theoretical approaches will rely on the contrast between what have come to be called higher-order theories and first-order theories. According to higher-order theories, the consciousness of a mental state, such as a perception, thought, or feeling, consists in one’s being aware of that state. First-order theories, by contrast, deny that any awareness of a state figures in that state’s being conscious. We will consider the variety of theories in each group, and their advantages and disadvantages.
 
Much of the evaluation of such theories will engage with a detailed consideration of empirical work on psychological phenomena such as unconscious priming, binocular rivalry, blindsight, neglect and extinction, anosognosia, Balint’s syndrome, split brain, and other conditions and dissociations that shed light on consciousness or its absence. We will want to understand in some detail the nature of these conditions in psychological terms, their neural underpinnings, and their significance for the understanding and explanation of consciousness.
 
There are no prerequisites, since this is a course offered jointly in philosophy, psychology, and cognitive neuroscience.
 
[Counts towards course satisfaction of Group B]
NOTE: This course is also listed as Psychology 87203 and Cognitive Neuroscience 70602.

PHIL 76300: Marx and Marxism
Mondays, 4:15 pm-6:15 pm, Room TBA, Prof. Mills

Widely judged to be dead in the heyday of neo-liberalism and the seeming global post-Cold War triumph of market ideology, left theory has made an impressive comeback in recent years. Witness the concern about the growing chasm between rich and poor in Western nations, and the spectacle of a self-proclaimed socialist drawing huge crowds on the U.S. campaign trail. Karl Marx’s ideas about macro historical patterns, globalization, economic tendencies within capitalist society, commodification and alienation, the power of the privileged classes, the role of dominant ideologies, and the possibility of a radically new social order are thus arguably as relevant as ever.
 
In this course, we will focus on trying to get clear on some of the key concepts within Marx’s thought, how they have been interpreted and developed by others and how well they stand up today, and the complex relationship (sometimes involving both critique and appropriation) between Marxism and other bodies of radical “oppositional” political theory (feminism, critical race theory, postcolonial theory).

[Counts towards course satisfaction of Group C or D-Modern]

PHIL 76100: Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century: Kant and his Predecessors
Mondays, 6:30 pm- 8:30 pm, Room TBA, Prof. Wilson

This seminar will study the formation of Kant's Transcendental Idealism as a reaction to the problems posed by his predecessors, including not only Descartes, Leibniz, and Locke, but also Buffon, Rousseau and Hume. Among the issues to be considered are: Atoms or monads? God as pathological idea, or as Nature itself, or as a person? An incorporeal soul or an organized material brain? Free will and responsibility or mechanism? Moral feeling or objective duties? Political hope or fatalistic resignation? Readings to be drawn from the above and from the secondary literature. The aim is to acquaint students with these important controversies and to understand and appreciate, but also to evaluate Kant's 'critical philosophy' as an attempted solution to them.
 
[Counts towards course satisfaction of Group A or D-Modern]

PSC 80304: Classics in Modern Philosophy
Wednesdays, 2:00pm–4:00pm. Prof. Uday Mehta, 4 Credits
 
This course is an introduction to the study of modern Western political philosophy. The course is organized around five classic texts. The orientation of the course will be mainly textual and not contextual. We will be concerned with the broad structure and the details of the arguments made in these texts regarding the basis of political society, the authority of government and the rights of citizens. Some of the recurring questions that inform these works are the following: What is the original motivation underlying the formation of political society? How do these motivations conform to the institutional arrangements that are proposed? What are the limits of legitimate political authority, and what are the philosophical justifications for these limits? What are the justifications underlying the various proposed institutional arrangements and under what conditions can these arrangements be legitimately suspended? Finally, does the organizing of political life do violence to other conceptions of human potentiality and social order?
 
PSC 80601: BioPolitics
Mondays, 2:00pm–4:00pm, Prof. Paisley Currah, 4 credits
 
In this course we will spend the first few weeks reading Foucault’s 1975-76, 1976-77 and 1977-78 lectures at the Collège de France, which collectively lay out the foundations for understanding what Foucault calls biopolitics (biopolitique). Foucault’s lectures on war, race, the pre-history of sovereignty, pastoral power, biopower, security, governmentality, liberalism, and neoliberalism upend traditional ways of thinking about politics and provide a model of the genealogical method, even as he moves from year to year to new problems and new ways of looking at them. While Foucault never got around to elucidating the detailed account of biopolitics he had planned, his work has generated an enormous literature on the topic.
 
After reading the lectures, we will turn to applications, reappraisals, and re-deployments of biopolitics in light of contemporary techniques for disassembling the individual and convening populations, and for refiguring the relation between death and power. Centering feminist, anti-racist, queer post-colonial, left, and post-Marxist perspectives, readings in the last part of the course may cover: population racism; Afro-Pessimism; neoliberal governance; biomedical citizenship; gender, nationalism, and the policing of bodies and borders; the new queer and trans normativities; the securitization of risk; the carceral state; and necropolitics. Students will be encouraged to apply the theoretical and empirical work on biopolitics to their own research interests.

PSC 80607: Beyond the Canon: Recent Trends in Political Theory
Mondays, 6:30pm–8:30pm, Prof. Susan Buck-Morss, 4 credits
 
How might the canon of political theory be thought/taught differently? This seminar is an experiment, a Spiel-raum for considering what canonical readings might say to us today. Rather than adding on to the white-male-western-canon some supplemental readings on race, gender, or non-western thought, we will consider, without prior categorization and concepts, some of the most basic problems and paradoxes of our discipline. Juxtapositions of texts will be unorthodox: theories of the state (Hobbes, Wynter on witchcraft, Caesaire on solidarity,); the paradox of the General Will (Rousseau, Lenin, and Daigne on African Socialism); The good life and the City (Aristotle, al-Farabi, and David Harvey on Gentrification); Fortune and/as Rape (Machiavelli, John of Patmos, and Agamben on kairos); Constitutions as fate (Federalist Papers, W. Benjamin, and Max Tomba on Insurgency); Oppression as Freedom: (Marx, Federici, and Fred Moten on performance).
 
PSC 71902: The Outcome of Classical German Philosophy
Mondays, 6:30pm–8:30pm, Prof. Richard Wolin, 3 credits
 
In 1886, Friedrich Engels wrote a perfectly mediocre book, Ludwig Feuerbach and the Outcome of Classical German Philosophy, which nevertheless managed to raise a fascinating and important question that is still being debated today: how should we go about evaluating the legacy of German Idealism following the mid-nineteenth century breakdown of the Hegelian system? For Engels, the answer was relatively simple: the rightful heir of classical German philosophy was Marx’s doctrine of historical materialism. But, in truth, Engels’ response was merely one of many possible approaches. Nor would it be much of an exaggeration to claim that, in the twentieth-century, there is hardly a philosopher worth reading who has not sought to define him or herself via a confrontation with the legacy of Kant and Hegel.
Our approach to this very rich material will combine a reading of the canonical texts of German Idealism (e.g., Kant and Hegel) with a sustained and complementary focus on major twentieth-century thinkers who have sought to establish their originality via a critical reading of Hegel and his heirs: Alexandre Kojève, Georges Bataille, Jean Hyppolite, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Theodor Adorno, and Jürgen Habermas. But we will also seek acknowledge the importance of the contemporary North American Hegel renaissance, as exemplified by the work of philosophers such as Charles Taylor, Robert Pippin, Michael Forster, Terry Pinkard, and Allen Wood.
In his “Discourse on Language” Foucault warns us appositely that, “Truly to escape Hegel involves an exact appreciation of the price we have to pay to detach ourselves from him. It assumes that we are aware of the extent to which Hegel, insidiously perhaps, is close to us; it implies a knowledge that permits us to think against Hegel, of that which remains Hegelian. Thus we have to determine the extent to which our anti-Hegelianism is possibly one of his tricks directed against us, at the end of which he stands, motionless, waiting for us.” Foucault’s insightful caveat will, in many respects, function as our interpretive watchword as we seek to decode and reconstruct German Idealism and its innovative contemporary legacies.
 
PSC 71903: Thucydides, Politics, Philosophy
Mondays, 6:30pm–8:30pm, Prof. Jennifer Roberts, 3 credits
 
This interdisciplinary course will be guided in part by the particular interests of the students who choose to enroll in it: historians, classicists, archaeologists, political scientists, philosophers. Although there will be common readings, students are encouraged to pursue their own perspectives on Thucydides while at the same time coming to appreciate his relevance to other disciplines. The text will be read in English, but I am happy to meet separately with students who would like to read selections in the original Greek.
A masterpiece of both narrative and analysis, Thucydides’ account of the war between the Athenian Empire and Peloponnesian League also merits study as a work of profound philosophical import. The work of a man filled with a plangent sense of the sorrows of the human condition, Thucydides’ history offered a non-fiction counterpart to the tragic drama of his contemporaries Sophocles and Euripides.
 
The father of political science, Thucydides has often been labeled the father of political realism. We will explore in what ways this is and is not accurate. Thucydides has been co-opted by one generation after another, on one continent after another, as a spokesman for its own society and identified as the one person who best understood the problems of the day. From monarchists to republicans in Europe to 20th and 21st century American neoconservatives, his readers have proudly cited him in defense of their ideologies. Today students of international relations wring their hands over the newly dubbed menace, “the Thucydides trap,” a concept that draws parallels between the diplomatic situation that led up to the Peloponnesian War and America’s growing tensions with China. Both Thucydides and his legacy will be the subjects of this course.

THEA 80300: Seminar in Theatre Theory & Criticism: German Theatre/Theory
Tuesdays, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Professor David Savran
 
This course will study leading figures in German playwriting, dramaturgy, theatrical theory, and mise en scène from the late eighteenth century to the present. Focusing on a number of key artists, it will analyze both their historical situations and their persistent relevance and vitality on the German-language stage. These include playwrights and composers Friedrich Schiller, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Richard Wagner, Bertolt Brecht, Marieluise Fleisser, Kurt Weill, Friedrich Dürrenmatt, Heiner Müller, and Elfriede Jelinek; directors Christoph Marthaler, Barrie Kosky, Yael Ronen, and Herbert Fritsch; and the collective Rimini Protokoll. Studying a number of plays and music theatre pieces in translation, the course will survey signal twentieth and twenty-first century productions as well as radically reconceived adaptations of classic texts. It will focus additionally on a number of key concepts that have impelled the work of both artists and theorists, such as Gesamtkunstwerk (total work of art), epic theatre, the aura, defamiliarization, commitment, post dramatic, and post-migrant. Evaluation: four short written reports, class participation, and a final paper.

THEA 80300: Seminar in Theatre Theory & Criticism: Theorizing the Oceanic from Antony and Cleopatra to John Akomfrah’s Vertigo Sea
Wednesdays, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Professor Maurya Wickstrom
 
This class explores the possibilities of the oceanic as an emergent theatre and performance practice, dramaturgy and politics. Paul Gilroy (of The Black Atlantic) has recently made a passionate argument for “sea-level theory.” We will practice this through adopting a “watery” perspective comprising a historical and theoretical constellation of white Enlightenment and modernity’s instrumentalization of the ocean; the imperial and colonial ocean-dependent production of what Sylvia Wynter calls genres of the human; the ocean of the slave trade; and, in opposition, the oceanic produced in the hold; in the Atlantic revolutions; in outer-national, interracial and multilinguistic oceanic labor, in the oceanic in Melville and the oceanic sublime; in the oceanic in archipelagic thought; in de-continentalization and more. Readings will include Sylvia Wynter, Christina Sharpe, Sarah Jane Cervenak, Fred Moten and Stefano Harney, Paul Gilroy, Cesare Casarino, Michelle Ann Stephens and others. Theory will be combined with plays and contemporary performance examples including Shakespeare, Derek Walcott, Naomi Wallace, Amiri Baraka, August Wilson, Robert Lowell, Adrienne Kennedy, Lina Issa and others. Ultimately the class will draw from this constellation and its vocabularies to theorize what theatre and performance imagined and structured by “wet ontology” (Philip Steinberg) - the oceanic as a dramaturgical theory - might be or how the oceanic might structure theoretical and/or historical thinking about theatre and performance.

THEA 81600: Seminar in Film Theory: Theories of the Cinema
Cross listed with FSCP8100 African Film History and Theory, 1950-1990
Mondays, 4:15 p.m. – 8:15 p.m., Instructor Boukary Sawadogo
 
The birth and development of African cinema in the 1950s started against the backdrop of the discourse of othering in colonial cinema. This is evident in the underlying civilizing mission of documentaries (education, health, agriculture) and travelogues. In addition, there is the quest for exoticism in Hollywood adventure/action film subgenre that prominently feature the three figures of the blonde, the safari hunter, and the native. African cinema started gaining international attention and recognition in the 1960s, with the works of pioneer filmmakers such as Ousmane Sembène, Med Hondo, and Moustapha Alassane. The historical development of African cinema until 1990 is marked with liberation struggle, appropriation of the gaze, and cultural nationalism. From a theoretical standpoint, African cinema can be regarded as a form of oppositional cinema in the vein of anti-establishment movements of the Italian neorealism, French New Wave, Cinema Novo, and Third Cinema.

THEA 85700: Seminar in Contemporary Performance Theory and Technique
Cross listed with ART86040 Cage & Cunningham
Wednesdays, 11:45-1:45 PM, Profs. Claire Bishop (Art History) and David Grubbs (Music)
 
Composer John Cage and choreographer Merce Cunningham began collaborating in the early 1950s, giving rise to a half decade of productive and disruptive innovations in music, dance and visual art. This research seminar will take Cage and Cunningham as a starting point to address broader interdisciplinary themes in performance from 1950 to 2010, including scoring, collaboration, improvisation, duration, and chance. The class is designed to facilitate the development of students’ own research papers, and is timed to take advantage of the Cunningham centenary in 2019.

SOC 73200: Gender & Globalization
Mondays, 2:00 PM- 4:00 PM, Prof. Eisenstein
 
SOC 70100: Development of Sociological Theory (Theory I)
Wednesdays, 6:30 PM -8:30 PM, Prof. Hammond

SPAN 70200: Critical Theory
GC: Monday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Silvia Dapía
 
SPAN 80100: Climate Change and Discursive Framing
GC: Tuesday, 11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m., Prof. José del Valle and Prof. David Lindo Atichati
 
SPAN 87100: Periodismo narrativo y ficción literaria en el México neoliberal: Políticas escriturales, estado de excepción y la industria cultural trasnacional
GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. Oswaldo Zavala