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Spring 2020 Courses

Core Course: 

CTCP 71088: Critical Theory: Foundations and Practices, GC:, Mondays, 4:15pm-6:15pm, 3, credits,  Prof. John Brenkman

Starting from the tension between Marx and Weber, the seminar will explore debates and developments that inform critical theory today, focused around salient conflicts in modern and contemporary thought: 
(1) How do conflicting paradigms of society as system (Luhmann), as norm-governed institutions (Habermas), as symbolic-institutional habitus and practices (Bourdieu), or as actor-networks (Latour) bear on interdisciplinary research? (2) How to conceptualize the aesthetic and ethical dimensions of everyday life in contemporary affluent societies (Bourdieu, Sloterdijk, Habermas, Fraser, Crenshaw, Ngai)? (3) How does the Anthropocene, as concept and actuality, open concepts of the human, nature, and technology to new questioning (Chakrabarty, Latour, Sloterdijk, Descola, Arendt, Morton, Colebrook,Jonas)? 
Texts: Garth and Mills (eds.), From Max Weber(Oxford); Peter Sloterdijk, You Must Change Your Life(Polity); Pierre Bourdieu, Pascalian Meditations(Stanford); Philippe Descola, The Ecology of Others(Prickly Paradigm). 
Excerpts and essays by Marx, Jürgen Habermas, Niklas Luhmann, Bruno Latour, Nancy Fraser, Kimberle Crenshaw, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Sianne Ngai, Hans Jonas, Timothy Morton, Claire Colebrook, and others will be provided via Blackboard.

This course requires special permission to enroll by contacting the certificate coordinator, Prof. John Brenkman. Not open to First year students.

Elective Courses:
 
ANTH 72300: Ethnography of Space & Place, GC: Wednesday, 11:45 am – 1:45 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Setha Low  

ANTH 77200: Narrative & Political Economy, GC: Tuesday, 11:45am-1:45pm, 3 credits, Prof. Sara Muir

ANTH 81800: Reading the Grundrisse, GC: Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits, Prof. David Harvey  

ANTH 82100: The Ethics and Politics of Care, GC: TH. 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits, Profs. Jeff Maskovsky and Danilyn Rutherford

ANTH 85000: Archaeological Theory, GC: Tuesdays, 11:45-1:45pm, 3 credits, Prof. Alexander Bauer

ART 81000: Love, Metaphor and the Image in Mughal India GC: Wed. 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Molly Aitken
 
ART 86020: Magic, Socialist, and other Realisms GC: Wed. 2:00-4:00 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Romy Golan
 
CL 80100: The Political Thought of Hannah Arendt, GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin

CL 89000: Reading Benjamin Reading Baudelaire, GC; Mondays: 4:15pm-6:15pm, Prof. Joshua Wilner, 2,4 credits
 
CL 89200: History of Literary Theory & Criticism II, GC:  Tuesday, 6:30pm-8:30pm, 4 credits, Prof. Martin Elsky

CLAS 75200: Aristotle and Neo-Aristotelian Virtue Ethics, GC: Monday and Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Vasiliou

EES 79903: Critical Geographies of Human Rights [62246], GC: M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Carmalt, Course open to EES Students only
 
EES 79903: Ethnography of Space and Place [62250], GC: R, 11:45-1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Low, Course open to EES Students only
 
EES 79903: Constructing Urban Futures [62247], GC: T, 11:45 am – 1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Stabrowski, Course open to EES Students only
 
EES 79003: Reading the Grundrisse [62283], GC: T, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30, The People’s Forum, 3 credits, Prof. Harvey, Course open to EES Students only
 
ENGL 80600. Theory of Lyric. John Brenkman. Wednesdays 4:15PM-6:15PM. 2/4 credits.
 
ENGL 89000: Introduction to Engaged Teaching and Transformative Learning in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Cathy Davidson and Eduardo Vianna. Thursdays 2:00PM-4:00PM. 2/4 credits.
 
ENGL 86800: Biopunk and other Speculative Fictions. Ashley Dawson. Fridays 11:45AM-1:45PM. 2/4 credits.
 
ENGL 82100. Early Modern Embodiment: Race, Gender, and Sexuality. Mario DiGangi. Wednesdays 11:45AM-1:45PM. 2/4 credits
 
ENGL 89500: Knowledge Infrastructures. Matt Gold. Wednesdays 4:15PM-6:15PM. 2/4 credits
 
ENGL 84200. Romantic/Moving/Break: Migration and the Worldly Imagination. Olivera Jokic. Tuesdays 4:15PM-6:15PM.
 
ENGL 82100. Death to Tyrants! Feisal Mohamed. Thursdays 11:45AM-1:45PM. 2/4 credits.
 
ENGL 80500. Feminist Criticism in Victorian Fiction: Recovery Feminism, and After. Talia Schaffer. Monday 11:45AM-1:45PM. 2/4 credits
 
ENGL 84200. Anthropocene Investigations. Alexander Schlutz. Mondays 4:15PM-6:15PM. 2/4 credits.
 
ENGL 79010. Language, Literacies, and Citizenship. Amy Wan. Mondays 2:00PM-4:00PM. 2/4 credits.
 
French 87000 : On Affect (Passion, Sentiment, Emotion): In Theory, History, Texts, Professor Domna Stanton, Tuesday, 4:15pm-6:15pm, 2 or 4 Credits.
 
French 71000 : Espaces, exclusions, identités de la fin du Moyen Âge jusqu’au XVIe siècle (taught in French), Professor Francesca Sautman, Wednesday, 6:30pm-8:30pm,  2 or 4 Credits.
 
HIST 75500 : Sojourners, Sultans, and Slaves: Slavery and Freedom in North America and the Indian Ocean, GC: Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Gunja SenGupta 
 
HIST 74900: Race, Gender and American Political Development, GC: Tuesdays, 11:45 am - 1:45 pm, 3 credits, Profs. David Waldstreicher & Ruth O’Brien
 
HIST 72400: The Political Thought of Hannah Arendt, GC: Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin
 
HIST 72100: Key Concepts in the Western Tradition, GC: Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt
 
SPAN 87000: The Neoliberal Promise of Happiness and Ugly Feelings: Post-Utopic Fiction and Film from Central America, GC: Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. Magdalena Perkowska
 
SPAN 87000: Raiding the Archive: Strategies from the Latin American Narrative Tradition, GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Carlos Riobó

MUS 83100: Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Readings in Musical Ethnography, GC: Wednesdays, 10 a.m.- 1 p.m., 3 credits, Professor Jane Sugarman

MUS 84200: Seminar in Theory/Analysis: Studies in Musical Semiotics, GC: Wednesdays, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., 3 credits, Professor Kofi Agawu

MUS 84300: Seminar in Theory/Analysis: Schenker II, GC: Wednesdays. 2 – 5 p.m., 3 credits, Professor William Rothstein

MUS 84100: Seminar in Theory/Analysis: Analysis of Pop and Rock Music, GC: Mondays, 6:30– 9:00 p.m., 3 credits, Professor Mark Spicer

MUS 86100: Seminar in Musicology: Adorno on Music, GC: Tuesdays, 2:00 – 5:00 p.m., 3 credits, Professor Chadwick Jenkins

PHIL 78600: Decolonial Feminist Ethics and Epistemology, Profs. Alcoff & Khader, 4 credits. Mon. 4:15-6:15
 
PHIL 77700: Neglected Topics in the Philosophy of Art and Aesthetics, Prof. Carroll, 4 credits, Tues. 11:45-1:45
 
PHIL 77300: Linguistic Pragmatism, Prof. Devitt, 4 credits, Tues. 6:30-8:30

PHIL 77600: Contractarianism and its Critics, Prof. Mills, 4 credits, Mon. 6:30-8:30
 
PHIL 76600: Philosophical Issues in Archaeology, Prof. Neale, 4 credits, Mon. & Tues. 4:15-6:15 [NOTE: This course meets twice a week for half the semester, from January 27 to March 16.]
 
PHIL 77200: Emotion, Prof. Prinz, 4 credits, Tues. 2:00-4:00
 
PHIL 76100: Hobbes & Spinoza, Prof. Steinberg, 4 credits, Weds. 11:45-1:45
 
PHIL 76000: Aristotle and Neo-Aristotelian Virtue Ethics, Prof. Vasiliou, 4 credits, Mon. & Tues. 4:15-6:15
 
PSC 72009: Gender, Race and American Political Development (AP), O’Brien & Waldstreicher, 3 credits, Tuesday 11:45am–1:45pm
 
PSC 71901: Contemporary Political Theory (PT), Prof. Marasco, 3 credits, Monday 11:45am–1:45pm (Cross list with WSCP 81000)
 
PSC 80602: Benjamin as Method (PT), Prof. Buck-Morss, 4 credits, Tuesday 2:00pm–4:00pm

PSC 80304: Ancient Greek Political Thought (PT), Prof. Mehta, 4 credits, Wednesday 2:00pm–4:00pm
 
PSC 71906: Machiavelli (PT), Prof. Fontana, 3 credits, Thursday 6:30pm–8:30pm
 
PSC 71908 (Crosslist with HIST. 72400): The Political Thought of Hannah Arendt (PT), Prof. Wolin, 3 credits, Monday 6:30pm–8:30pm
 
SOC 85200: Transnational Social Movements, Prof. Carolina Bank Muñoz, 3 credits, Thursdays, 2:00- 4:00pm
 
SOC 82800: Capitalism, Race and Class, Prof. Charles Post, 3 credits, Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm
 
SOC 8000: Foucault, Bourdieu and Baudrillard: Culture, Power, and Sexuality in the Global Era, Prof. Marnia Lazreg, Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits
 
THEA 70600: History of Theatrical Theory, (Professor Peter Eckersall), Tuesdays, 4:15 p.m. to 6:15 p.m, 3 credits.
           
THEA 71400: Aesthetics of the Film (This course is sponsored by Film Studies Certificate Program), Professor Jerry Carlson, Wednesdays, 4:15 p.m. to 6:15 p.m., 3 credits.

THEA 81500: Seminar in Film Studies: Film/Media Theory Strategies of Resistance, Prof. Amy Herzog, Thursdays, 11:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m., 3 credits.
 
UED 75200: Critical Perspectives on Hope, Love and Care in Urban SchoolingProf. Rivera-McCutchen, 

UED 75200: What’s Foucault Got To Do With It?: Race, Gender and Neoliberalism As Educational Spaces, Prof. Sonu, Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m.

UED 75200: Race/ism and Intersectionality in Urban Education: Theory, Praxis, and Transformation, Prof. Deckman, Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

UED 75200: Approaches to Discourse Analysis in Language and Literacy Research, Prof. Schieble, Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.

UED 75200: Critical University Studies, Prof. Brier, Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.

Course Descriptions:

ANTH 72300: Ethnography of Space & Place
, GC: Wednesday, 11:45 am – 1:45 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Setha Low  

This section open to Anthropology students only; course is cross-listed with PSY and EES.
Introduction:  The study of the city has undergone a transformation during the past 20 years integrating ever wider theoretical perspectives from anthropology, cultural geography, political economy, urban sociology, and regional and city planning, and expanding its attention to the city as physical, architectural and virtual form.  An emphasis on spatial relations and consumption as well as urban planning and design decision-making provides new insights into material, ideological and metaphorical aspects of the urban environment.  Reliance on ethnography of space and place allows researchers to present an experience-near account of everyday life in urban housing or local markets, while at the same time addressing macro-processes such as globalization and the new urban social order.

This course sketches some of the methodological and theoretical implications of the ethnographic study of the contemporary city using anthropological tools of participant observation, interviewing, behavioral mapping, and theories of space and place to illuminate spaces in modern/post-modern cities and their transformations.  In doing so, I wish to underscore links between the shape, vision and experience of cities and the meanings that their citizens read off screens and streets into their own lives. It begins with a discussion of spatializing culture, that is the way that culture is produced and expressed spatially, and the way that space reflects and changes culture. The subsequent weeks explore different theoretical dimensions, embodied space, the social construction of space, the social production of space, language and discursive space, and digital or ambiguous space. The course also explores a number of special topics including how urban fear is transforming the built environment and the nature of public space both in the ways that we are conceiving the re/building our cities, and in the ways that residential suburbs are being transformed into gated and walled enclaves of private privilege and public exclusion.  The privatization of public space first signaled the profound changes that American cities are undergoing in terms of their physical, social and cultural design.  Currently, however, increased fear of violence and others particularly in urban areas is producing new community and public space forms; locked neighborhoods, blank faced malls in urban areas, armed guard dogs on public plazas, and limited access housing developments are just some examples of how the cultural mood is being “written” on the landscape.       

ANTH 77200: Narrative & Political Economy, GC: Tuesday, 11:45am-1:45pm, 3 credits, Prof. Sara Muir
Fulfills Linguistic Anthropology subfield core course requirement.

ANTH 81800: Reading the Grundrisse, GC: Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits, Prof. David Harvey 
Cross listed w/EES; seats are limited.
Meets at The People’s Forum, 320 West 37th Street. See https://peoplesforum.org/ for more info.
The course entails a close reading of Marx's Grundrisse.

ANTH 82100: The Ethics and Politics of Care, GC: TH. 4:15-6:15pm, 3 credits, Profs. Jeff Maskovsky and Danilyn Rutherford

Instructor’s permission required. Please email jmaskovsky@gc.cuny.edu with a brief statement explaining your interest in the course.

ANTH 85000: Archaeological Theory, GC: Tuesdays, 11:45-1:45pm, 3 credits, Prof. Alexander Bauer

Required for students in the Archaeology subfield who have not yet taken the First Exam.

ART 81000: Love, Metaphor and the Image in Mughal India GC: Wed. 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Molly Aitken
 
This is a class about what images made possible for South Asia’s polyglot, multiethnic, religiously diverse society under Mughal imperial rule (1556-1858). The pervasive theme of love in Mughal fine arts suspended cultural differences in poetics, intellectual play, and mysticism to result in a distinctive Indian aesthetics that emphasized emotional affect. We will follow the theme of love as it circulated through the closely interrelated mediums of painting, poetry and music. Gender and sexuality will be front and center of our discussions, along with self-fashioning and the homosocial bonds fostered through connoisseurship. We will look at the staging and restaging of desire, often through metaphor and beauty, as well as through fantasies about what images are and how powerful they can be. Throughout, we keep in view the fate of Mughal arts and aesthetics in the colonial period, and we revisit twentieth-century art histories for a deeper understanding of how the discipline has engaged with South Asia’s non-western, premodern visual traditions. Class discussions and assignments encourage students to ask new questions and to explore new methods, especially with a view to globalizing the discipline.
 
Auditors allowed with permission
 
ART 86020: Magic, Socialist, and other Realisms GC: Wed. 2:00-4:00 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Romy Golan
 
Figurative painting stood in a false position after abstraction and photomontage in the 1920s. But it registered like no other art form both the condition of painting as a medium, and its relation to the politics of its times. From the 1920s to the 1960s artists on opposite ends of the political spectrum recruited realism for their cause. A new reading of realism might, for instance, throw some light on an episode such as this: in 1930, the French Surrealist writer Louis Aragon penned the essay In Defiance of Painting to accompany a Parisian exhibition that revisited, radically, the entire history of the first three decades of the century via collage. Less than two years later Aragon was speaking in Moscow at a conference on Socialist Realism. Primary sources will include texts by Franz Roh, Massimo Bontempelli, Louis Aragon, André Breton, Roger Caillois, Berthold Brecht, Andrei Zhdanov. Secondary literature will include Erich Auerbach, Mimesis; Helmut Lethen, Cool Conduct; Devin Fore, Realism after Modernism; Jacques Rancière, The lost Thread; and Frederic Jameson, Antinomies of Realism.
 
No auditors allowed

CL 80100: The Political Thought of Hannah Arendt, GC: Monday, 6:30-8:30pm, 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin
 
In the annals of twentieth-century political thought, Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) carved out a unique and enduring niche. Today, some 40 years after her death, her political philosophy seems more relevant than ever. In 1951, she wrote the first important book on totalitarianism, perhaps the central political problem of the twentieth century. Seven years later, Arendt published her landmark contribution to European political thought, the Human Condition, in which she seeks to probe and to delineate the existential bases of human freedom. Avoiding the liberal political idiom of "rights," Arendt broaches this theme in terms of the ontological values of "plurality" and "action" – constituents of human distinctiveness that Arendt traces back to the glories of Periclean Athens. Nevertheless, she also found important modern political corollaries to "action" in the fleeting experience of direct (that is, non-representative) democracy: in the notion of "local democracy" that flourished in pre-revolutionary America and in the emergence of "workers consuls" in the course of the European revolutions of 1905, 1918, and 1956.   Our main thematic focus will concern Arendt’s central contributions to twentieth century political thought: The Origins of Totalitarianism (1951),The Human Condition (1958),andOn Revolution (1962).However, as preparation for this encounter, attention to Arendt’s formative philosophical and political influences is indispensable. Therefore, in conjunction with these works, we will also selectively read a number of background texts that will assist us in clarifying the conceptual framework that Arendt develops in her mature political works. Essential in this regard are key texts by Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics) and by Arendt’s legendary German mentor, Martin Heidegger (Being and Time). At specific junctures, Arendt’s voluminous correspondence with another celebrated mentor, Karl Jaspers, will also guide us.   Finally, the “Arendt renaissance” of recent years has been punctuated by important cinematic representations of her life and thought – a dimension of the international Hannah Arendt reception story that we will analyze and reflect upon in conclusion.
  
CL 89000: Reading Benjamin Reading Baudelaire, GC; Mondays: 4:15pm-6:15pm, Prof. Joshua Wilner, 2,4 credits
 
The latter phase of Walter Benjamin's critical work seeks to amalgate a highly individual understanding of literary language - itself the heterogeneous product of an esoteric hermeneutics and a concept of criticism derived from early German Romanticism - with a Marxist historical materialism. Central to this project were the writings and figure of Charles Baudelaire, "A Lyric Poet in the Era of High Capitalism" in Benjamin's formulation. Benjamin's engagement with Baudelaire begins with his 1923 translation of "Tableaux Parisiens," for which his essay on "The Task of the Translator" was written as a preface, and continues through the unfinished Arcades Project, of which "convolute J" on Baudelaire is by far the largest section. In this course we will trace the evolution of Benjamin's reading of Baudelaire, beginning with his 1923 translation of Tableaux Parisiens, which his essay on "The Task of the Translator" was written as a preface, and continuing through the unfinished Arcades Project, of which "convolute J" on Baudelaire is by far the largest part. Our aim in doing so will be two-fold: to take Benjamin as a guide to reading Baudelaire, of course, but also to use the work on Baudelaire as a way of studying Benjamin's critical procedures. Readings in Baudelaire will include all of the poetry and prose poetry, and much of the critical writings. Readings in Benjamin will include the materials collected in The Writer of Modern Life: Essays on Charles Baudelaire, edited my Michael Jennings, and sections of the Arcades Project.
 
CL 89200: History of Literary Theory & Criticism II, GC:  Tuesday, 6:30pm-8:30pm,  4 credits, Prof. Martin Elsky
 
A study of the development of thought about literature in nineteenth and twentieth centuries criticism and philosophy. The course will start from attempts to incorporate literature into patterns of aesthetic, moral, cultural, and historical coherence, and will move to the specter of incoherence, force, and trauma as the underlying impetus of literature. Readings will include Hegel, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Schleiermacher, Nietzsche, Eliot, Brooks, Auerbach, Benjamin, Levinas, Derrida, Foucault, Bhabha, Casanova.

CLAS 75200: Aristotle and Neo-Aristotelian Virtue Ethics, GC: Monday and Tuesday, 4:15-6:15 PM, 3 credits, Prof. Vasiliou

[NOTE: This course meets twice a week for half the semester, from March 23 through May 12.]
According to most standard accounts, modern virtue ethics begins with Elizabeth Anscombe's essay "Modern Moral Philosophy" in 1958 and develops over the second half of the twentieth century as an alternative to deontological and consequentialist moral theories.   Rather than obligation as the centerpiece of moral theory, it is commonly held that virtue ethics focuses on human flourishing and the virtues of character that constitute it.  Aristotle is the patron saint of this movement.  Over the last twenty years, some have begun to question what virtue ethics is, how and whether it differs from other types of ethical theory, and even to what extent Aristotle should be called a virtue ethicist.  Some now avoid the term “virtue-ethics” and prefer to speak instead of “Neo-Aristotelian” ethics; under this label one might include the work of Julia Annas, Phillipa Foot, Rosalind Hursthouse, Alasdair MacIntyre, John McDowell, Martha Nussbaum, and Michael Thompson.  While all of these philosophers discuss virtue, only some would identify their positions as belonging to “virtue ethics.”
 
We shall examine what sort of ethical theory contemporary Neo-Aristotelian ethics is and how it fits with what we actually find in Aristotle.  What does it say about the relationships between agents and actions?  How does it contrast with deontology or consequentialism? What does it mean for ethics to be "virtue-based", "character-based" or "agent-based/centered", as opposed to "rule-based" or "act-based/centered"?  What is the role of (human) nature in Neo-Aristotelian ethics? Does practical reason operate differently in Neo-Aristotelian ethics than in other types of ethical theory?
 
We will do a close reading of major parts of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, including his discussions of eudaimonia, the virtues of character, practical reason, moral psychology, decision and deliberation, voluntary action, and the unity of virtues.   We will interweave this with readings from secondary literature on the Ethics as well as from the “Neo-Aristotelians” mentioned above.
 
It will be important for us to work from the same translation of the Nicomachean Ethics.  For various reasons, we shall use Terence Irwin's translation, second edition, Hackett Press; I ask you all to acquire a copy.  We will also consult the Rowe/Broadie translation from Oxford, and the "Revised Oxford Translation" by Ross and revised by Urmson, published in the Complete Works of Aristotle (ed. J. Barnes, Princeton University Press). 
               
Please read Book I of the Nicomachean Ethics for the first class. First class will meet on 3/23, not 3/17 (there will be a make-up class, TBA). The seminar fulfills Distribution Area C or D-Ancient.  Philosophy students wishing to satisfy Distribution Area D-ancient with this seminar must write a term paper that focuses on Aristotle’s ethics.

ENGL 80600. Theory of Lyric. John Brenkman. Wednesdays 4:15PM-6:15PM. 2/4 credits.
 
The Lyric Theory Reader: A Critical Anthology, ed. Virginia Jackson and Yopie Prins (2014) and Jonathan Culler’s Theory of the Lyric (2015) will be used to survey a wide range of theoretical and interpretive approaches to poetry. Poems from various literary periods will be discussed in conjunction with the theoretical readings. Students will develop a semester project on a poet of their choosing through whose work they can test and contest, amplify and enrich, theories of lyric encountered in the course of the seminar.

 
ENGL 89000.  Introduction to Engaged Teaching and Transformative Learning in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Cathy Davidson and Eduardo Vianna, Thursdays 2:00PM-4:00PM. 2/4 credits.
 
What does it mean to “introduce” a student to a field? This course is intended for any graduate student in the humanities or social sciences who is thinking seriously about the deepest “why” and “how” questions about their discipline and how those apply to their own research and teaching. We will begin with theoretical questions about disciplines, fields, foundations, pedagogy, research, aesthetics, and institutional structures alongside issues of equity, diversity, inclusion, social justice, engagement, and transformation. In each class and in final projects, we will encourage students to transform critique into engaged practice. Students will work collaboratively on analyzing and then designing: (1) a standard anthology or textbook in their field; (2) key articles or critical texts in their field; (3) standard syllabi of introductory or “core” courses in their field; (4) keywords in their field. Students will leave the course with a deeper understanding of the assumptions of their field and new methods for transformative learning that support diversity, inclusion, and a more equitable form of higher education. Our aim is to work toward “research with a transformative activist agenda” and teaching and mentoring as a “collaborative learning community project” that, in the end, contributes to education as a public good and a more just and equitable society.
Readings will be chosen from: Lev Vygotsky, Paulo Freire, bell hooks, Frantz Fanon, Audre Lorde, Anna Stetsenko, Michelle Fine, Ira Shor, Stuart Hall, Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, José Munoz, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Judith Butler, Peter Galison, Sara Ahmed, Alfie Kohn, Christopher Newfield, John Warner, Kandice Chuh, Roderick Ferguson, Kurt Lewin, Lisa Lowe, Tressie McMillan Cottom, Sara Goldrick-Rab, Michael Fabricant, Stephen Brier, Cathy Davidson, Eduardo Vianna, as well as authors included in the crowdsourced “Progressive Pedagogy” bibliography being developed on hastac.org:
(https://www.hastac.org/blogs/ckatopodis/2019/01/11/progressive-pedagogy-public-working-bibliography)
 
ENGL 86800: Biopunk and other Speculative Fictions. Ashley Dawson. Fridays 11:45AM-1:45PM. 2/4 credits.
 
The ideologies that have supported modern liberalism’s purported “end of history” are wearing thin. The unsustainable nature of the current social order is becoming increasingly apparent. With the old social democratic left sullied by their embrace of neoliberalism, popular dissent is drifting towards the new right. We seem to be on the cusp of a whole series of radical changes. Climate chaos is already scrambling weather systems, melting glaciers that provide drinking water for hundreds of millions of people, and making urban life around the world increasingly difficult for all but the most wealthy. Entire ecosystems are being levelled by the inexorable drive of capitalism to expand at compound growth rates. Robots and AI are taking over jobs around the world and in every sector of the economy. Genetic editing and synthetic biology are radically altering existing life forms and may soon be employed on human populations to eliminate disease and prolong life, but who will be able to afford such post-human perks? Can we look forward to a world of unprecedented plenty powered by ubiquitous solar energy technologies, or will we descend into a Hobbesian war of all against all?
 
This course engages some of the most pressing questions of the present and near future through examination of three genres of speculative fiction: cyberpunk, biopunk, and solarpunk. Each of these genres ruptures the hegemony of what Mark Fisher called “capitalist realism,” the grating but nonetheless ubiquitous belief that it is easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. The guiding assumption of the course is that these and related genres of speculative fiction provide what Fredric Jameson called “archaeologies of the future,” toolkits for imagining tomorrow otherwise and instruction manuals to guide the work of activism and community-building for which the trying circumstances of the present call out.
 
The course very consciously engages with efforts to represent possible futures articulated from a variety of geographical locations around the world and from heterogeneous subject positions. In addition, the course toggles constantly between speculative fiction and nonfiction in an effort to assess the capacities of various genres to mobilize different affects (hope, fear, revulsion, etc.) in relation to possible futures.
 
Works we are likely to discuss, in full or in part, include:
 

  • Neel Ahuja, Bioinsecurities
  • Margaret Atwood, The Year of the Flood
  • Paolo Bacigalupi, The Windup Girl
  • Aaron Bastani, Fully Automated Luxury Communism
  • Georges Bataille, The Accursed Share
  • Lauren Beukes, Zoo City
  • Elly Blue, Biketopia: Feminist Bicycle Science Fiction Stories in Extreme Futures
  • Ryan Coogler, Black Panther
  • Melinda Cooper, Life as Surplus
  • Mark Fisher, Capitalist Realism
  • William Gibson, Neuromancer
  • Amitav Ghosh, The Great Derangement
  • Donna Haraway, Cyborg Manifesto
  • Michael Hardt & Toni Negri, Commonwealth
  • Katherine Hayles, How We Became Posthuman
  • Walidah Imarisha and Adrienne Brown, Octavia’s Brood
  • Fredric Jameson, Archaeologies of the Future
  • Larissa Lai, Salt Fish Girl
  • Gerson Lodi-Ribeiro, ed., Solarpunk
  • Andreas Malm, Fossil Capitalism
  • Andrew Niccol, Gattaca
  • Alex Rivera, Sleep Dealer
  • Boots Riley, Sorry to Bother You
  • Sophia Roosth, Synthetic: How Life Got Made
  • Hermann Scheer, The Solar Economy
  • Shelby Streeby, Imagining the Future of Climate Change
  • Shoshona Zuboff, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism
 
ENGL 82100. Early Modern Embodiment: Race, Gender, and Sexuality. Mario DiGangi. Wednesdays 11:45AM-1:45PM. 2/4 credits
 
In this seminar we will explore race, gender, and sexuality as overlapping and intersecting modes of embodiment in the literature and culture of premodern England. While our focus will be sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England, we will consider continuities and differences between medieval and early modern European discourses of race/gender/sexuality. Drama will be at the center of our investigations, but we will also examine a variety of texts from multiple genres, including love poetry, visual art, prose romance, court masque, and travel narrative, in an effort to understand the tropes and formal conventions through which racial, gender, and sexual differences were made to signify. Readings will cluster around five major topics: 1) Race/Gender/Sex and the Color of Beauty; 2) Race/Gender/Sex and Courtly Culture; 3) Race/Gender/Sex and Travel; 4) Race/Gender/Sex and Religion; 5) Race/Gender/Sex and the Global Circulation of English Honor. Readings will include Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus, The Merchant of Venice, Othello, and Sonnets; Jonson, The Masque of Blackness; Lanyer, Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum; Massinger, The Renegado; Fletcher, The Island Princess; Dekker, Lust’s Dominion; Heywood, The Fair Maid of the West; and Day, Rowley, and Wilkins, The Travels of the Three English Brothers. Through the work of scholars such as Abdulhamit Arvas, Dennis Britton, Kim Hall, Geraldine Heng, Carol Mejia LaPerle, Arthur Little, Ania Loomba, Joyce Green Macdonald, Jeffrey Masten, Jennifer Morgan, Carmen Nocentelli, Melissa Sanchez, Ian Smith, and Valerie Traub, we will also consider how different theoretical and historical approaches have produced varying accounts of race/gender/sex as objects of inquiry in the premodern and contemporary eras.​
 
ENGL 89500: Knowledge Infrastructures. Matt Gold. Wednesdays 4:15PM-6:15PM. 2/4 credits
 
Infrastructure is all around us, rarely remarked upon. Indeed, the latent state of infrastructure is part of what marks it as such; as Susan Leigh Starr has noted, infrastructure studies involves the examination of "boring things."
 
This class will explore the emerging nexus of critical infrastructure studies and critical university studies, focusing on the infrastructure of scholarly knowledge. From our libraries to our journals to our conferences to our operating systems to our use of social media, scholars communicate through an entanglement of corporate and commercial interests. Beyond the obviously problematic commercial infrastructures built by predatory publishers and corporate conglomerates such as Elsevier, scholars routinely depend on for-profit publication venues and commercial journals to disseminate their work.
 
As a set of alternatives to the commercialized infrastructure of knowledge dissemination in the academy, the course will consider open access publication models, free software development, and university press publishing. Even as we explore such alternatives, we will critique them, considering the ways that such alternatives themselves depend upon commercial technical stacks, and considering whether these alternatives are equally available and accessible across the globe.
 
Among the scholars we will study are: Susan Leigh Starr; Alan Liu; Kathleen Fitzpatrick; Christopher Kelty; Christopher Newfield; Stephen Brier and Michael Fabricant; Benjamin Bratton; Shannon Mattern; Nicole Starosielski; Trebor Scholz; Brian Greenspan; and Yarimar Bonilla and Max Hantel. Topics to be explored include: introductions to critical infrastructure studies and critical university studies; the environmental impact of the cloud; the free software movement; academic publishing models; constructing open platforms. Students in the class will explore publishing platforms collaboratively created by CUNY and other partners, including the CUNY Academic Commons and Manifold, as well as others such as Humanities Commons and Zotero. The goal of the class, in the end, is to ask students to consider how and where their own scholarly knowledge is distributed, and by whom and under what terms.
 
ENGL 84200. Romantic/Moving/Break: Migration and the Worldly Imagination. Olivera Jokic. Tuesdays 4:15PM-6:15PM.
 
Starting from the disorienting fractures of American, French, and Haitian Revolutions and their relationship to modern European empires, this course considers how mobility (possible, permitted, desired, required, forced) reconfigures conceptions of communal life, elasticity of selfhood, and the affect appropriate to shifting social relations. What some historians of society have called the “age of revolution” neatly encompassed what literary historians have called the “Romantic” period. The canonical texts of Romanticism aspired to create a new kind of reading public: to devise a new kind of moving writing that would disrupt the uniformity of taste and feeling circulating in the reading market. How does an intervention in poetic language (to get us closer to vitality of “the language really used by men,” said William Wordsworth in 1801) bring about political change? What is the relationship between “Romanticism,” moving, and radical social change?
 
“Romanticism” will be a category for thinking about literary periodization along other modern forms of thought, from nationalism and public feeling, empire and linguistics, to liberal capitalism, historiography, and race. Considering how notions of movement and instability have defined modern life organized around elastic nation states, the course will examine how interpretation and “literary” text can operate as privileged instruments of knowing and communion. Who are the “men” and other figures whose language and feelings appeared unadulterated by the society changed by print and reading? How do some forms of writing and interpretation acquire ideological and political power in particular historical contexts, and how do some accounts of human transformation and relocation elicit affective response or become historical documentation? Attention to such histories of form and genre will get us to consider how “Romanticism” engages with eighteenth-century and earlier writing traditions; how gendered legacies of thinking about writing and Literature include “women’s writing” in the literary canon; and how histories of writing overlap with emergent conceptions of human interiority and possibilities of a life narrative.
 
To think about what it means to move and be moved in the world as we know it, we will ask what it means to treat national, geographic, or disciplinary boundaries as relevant markers of movement; how states and fields of scholarship shape their “imagined communities” around conceptions of writing, reading, and political intervention; and how the idea of moving towards or away from “one’s own people” says something about what kind of world we live in, where we know to look for relevant others, what they mean to us, and how we learn to have feelings. Using these materials we will speculate about the possibilities of translation and of a “world literature,” in order to think about how “literature” operates now as one of the fields that shape individual, historical, and political imagination.
 
The writing exercises that emerge from our conversations will include workshops in which we experiment with some dominant genres of academic writing and communication. From this practice students could come out with a sample of their own work nearly ready to circulate: to propose as a presentation at an academic conference, submit to a peer-reviewed publication, or to create a syllabus promising an exciting course in their professed field of interest or expertise.
 
ENGL 82100. Death to Tyrants! Feisal Mohamed. Thursdays 11:45AM-1:45PM. 2/4 credits.
 
“There can be slain no sacrifice to God,” Seneca’s Hercules declares, “more acceptable than an unjust and wicked king.” The statement epitomizes much classical thought on the subject. Aristotle in the Politics praises the killing of a tyrants, and emphasizes the right of citizens to seek a public life leading to the good. Cicero is more emphatic still. Tyrants show the exact opposite of the spirit of fraternity that should govern human interactions, and so, as he puts it in De officiis, “that pestilent and abominable race should be exterminated from human society.” The Reformation’s white-hot religious controversies, and humanist re-engagement of classical thought, lead the question of tyrannicide to bubble to the surface of early modern thought. Philipp Melanchthon quoted Seneca in expressing a hope that “some strong man” would kill King Henry VIII to avenge the death of Thomas Cromwell. John Milton quotes the passage in his vigorous defense of the execution of King Charles I, The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates. Melanchthon and Milton thus help to forge a Protestant tradition of thought on tyrannicide that includes François Hotman, John Knox, and George Buchanan, a tradition finding 20th-century expression in the thought of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, the pacifist Lutheran minister who conspired against Hitler. We must also recognize, however, that immediately after killing the tyrant Lycus, Seneca’s Hercules is visited by a madness that leads him to kill his wife and children. Noble and necessary as it might be, tyrannicide is also symptom and expression of a deep wrench in right order. So it is in especially in early modern tragedy, that genre obsessed with ills spanning human and cosmic realms, that we see tyrannicide explored in all of its complexity.
 
At bottom, early modern engagements of tyrannicide are also engagements of the foundations of political society, and meditations on the proper relationship between subject and sovereign. Here we find leitmotifs of early modern political thought that continue to be revolutionary in late modernity: sovereignty is delegated from the people, not transferred to the sovereign, and so can be revoked when the people so choose; citizenship must include the right of resistance, otherwise political life is a form of slavery. We will explore the engagement of these ideas across English and Continental, Protestant and Catholic thinkers, in literary and non-literary texts.
 
Students will be expected to deliver a conference-style presentation that will form the basis of a ten-page paper, and to develop that paper into a final research essay of 16 pages.
 
Preliminary list of readings: Seneca, Hercules furens; George Buchanan, Jephtha; John Ponet, A Short Treatise of Politike Power; François Hotman, Francogallia (selections); Brutus, Vindiciae, contra tyrannos; Christopher Marlowe, The Massacre at Paris; Juan de Mariana, De rege; William Shakespeare, The Rape of Lucrece, Hamlet, and Macbeth; John Milton, The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates, Paradise Lost, and Samson Agonistes.
 
ENGL 80500. Feminist Criticism in Victorian Fiction: Recovery Feminism, and After. Talia Schaffer. Monday 11:45AM-1:45PM. 2/4 credits
 
In this course we explore the history of academic feminist work in Victorian studies since the 1970s, intertwining critical work with literary texts, evaluating the ‘recovery feminist’ approach of second-wave feminism as we try to outline a contemporary feminist approach. We will, for instance, cover the first wave of feminist recovery work of the 70s and 80s by Showalter, Spacks, Gilbert and Gubar, Poovey, Spivak, along with “Cassandra” and Jane Eyre. We will then look at cultural feminist criticism of the 90s Armstrong and Gallagher with Middlemarch and Miss Marjoribank, and look at the 21st century queer, ethical, and digital turns of feminist work in criticism by Marcus, Ehnenn, Ahmed, Nowviskie, Berlant, with Mansfield Park. In assessing fifty years of Victorian feminist criticism, we will be looking at race, empire, bodies, and sexuality, but we will also be interrogating what kind of feminist criticism might be appropriate to a decentralized, gender-fluid, digital contemporary mode. We will read Sara Ahmed, Living a Feminist Life and Kate Manne, Down Girl, and students will find and present their own feminist case studies, which may include interrogating the place of feminist criticism in environmental humanities, critical race theory, disability studies, animal studies, postcolonialism. Presentation, blog, and final paper.
 
ENGL 84200. Anthropocene Investigations. Alexander Schlutz. Mondays 4:15PM-6:15PM. 2/4 credits.
 
The term “Anthropocene,” first introduced by the chemist and Nobel Laureate Paul Crutzen and the biologist Eugene Stoermer nearly twenty years ago, has by now become the most widely used designation for the current period of global, human-induced environmental catastrophe in both scholarly and public discourse. The appropriateness of the term (though of course not the global crisis it seeks to highlight) has, however, been subject to vigorous critique in the social sciences and the humanities, mainly due to its problematic naturalization of the human and its erasure of crucial questions of human difference and responsibility. From the perspective of the humanities in particular, a return to a species narrative, with an undifferentiated anthropos writ large as the protagonist, can seem to erase in one fell swoop decades of scholarly work in critique of essentialist conceptions of “the human.” A range of alternatives, from Capitalocene to Chtulucene, have been proposed in an effort to alter the narrative parameters in order to call anthropocene grand narratives into question.
 
At the same time, a growing number of scholars in the humanities take seriously the challenge of the “Anthropocene” to rethink what viable narratives about and representations of the relationships of human beings to their environments might look like at a moment of global crisis where human and natural history can no longer be thought of as disentangled. Such attempts include a newly framed engagement with literature and art more broadly as modes of representation that might allow us to bring the contemporary human predicament into view in different ways than scientific data and public policy debates.
 
To address these overlapping discussions, this seminar will offer a two-fold investigation. On the one hand, we will attempt to take stock of the disciplinary discussion surrounding the “Anthropocene” and examine a range of critical perspectives and proposed alternatives in naming and timeline. At the same time, we will also turn our attention to emergent transdisciplinary approaches in the environmental humanities, as well as to the creative practice in literature and the arts, in order to investigate what a poetics for the “Anthropocene” might look like. Our theoretical interlocutors will include Bruno Latour, Donna Haraway, Kathryn Yussof, and T.J. Demos, among others.
 
Course requirements: 3 short position papers; 15-minute conference presentation at the in-class, end-of-semester course conference; final 15-20 page research paper.
 
ENGL 79010. Language, Literacies, and Citizenship. Amy Wan. Mondays 2:00PM-4:00PM. 2/4 credits.
 
In January 2019, an email from an administrator in the Duke University biostatistics program in their medical school went viral. In it, the administrator warns Chinese international students about the unintended consequences of their use of Chinese in social settings in the college’s common areas. This email (and its backlash) reflects how institutional power can be yielded at the intersection of race, language, and literacy. This class will explore such intersections with a focus on the ways literacies are used to define, restrict, confine and cultivate citizenship.
 
Readings will range from histories of race, civil rights, and immigration in the US, theories on literacy and citizenship, and rhetorics of institutions, public policy, and social movements in order to analyze the complexities of these moments. While US education and citizenship will be a common example in some of the readings, the course material also takes into account the transnational movement of people and the global economy, as well as questions the value, ideal, and construct of citizenship itself. Additionally, students will also be asked to interrogate their own positions as educators who work for or who hope to work for institutions. Drawing from L.A. Paperson’s A Third University is Possible, part of the work of the class will be to identify spaces where resistance and transformation are possible. Assignments will include the opportunity to practice academic genres such as an annotated bibliography, book review essays, and conference proposal/presentation. Students are encouraged to bring their own projects and interests to the class (although a specific project is not necessary), and all disciplines and specializations are invited to join.
 
Students will read an average of 100 pages per week and will likely be drawn from from Piya Chatterjee and Sunaina Maira’s The Imperial University: Academic Repression and Scholarly Dissent, Candace Epps-Roberton’s Resisting Brown: Race, Literacy, & Citizenship in the Heart of Virginia, Haivan V. Hoang’s Writing Against Racial Injury: The Politics of Asian American Student Rhetoric, Scott Richard Lyons’s X-Marks: Native Signatures of Assent, Ersula Ore’s Lynching: Violence, Rhetoric, and American Identity, L.A. Paperson’s A Third University is Possible, Jonathan Rosa’s Looking Like a Language, Sounding Like a Race: Raciolinguistics Ideologies and the Learning of Latinidad, Kate Vieira’s American by Paper: How Documents Matter in Immigrant Literacy, Shui-Yin Sharon Yam’s Inconvenient Strangers: Transnational Subjects and the Politics of Citizenship (I am also open to suggestions, particularly those that interrogate positionalities and perspectives other than the ones represented here).
 
EES 79903: Critical Geographies of Human Rights [62246], GC: M, 2:00-4:00 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Carmalt, Course open to EES Students only
 
This course looks at how injustice, geography, and law relate to one another. It is interdisciplinary, and organized around three sets of literature: (1) critical human geography (including political ecology) literature that examines how injustices are created and sustained through spatial processes, (2) socio-legal scholarship that focuses on understanding law as a social construction, and (3) public international law scholarship that provides a doctrinal counterpart to social science explanations of injustice. We will draw on case studies ranging from race and urbanization in the United States to historical definitions of belonging for minority populations in Myanmar. Students will be expected to lead class discussions and write a paper on a relevant topic of their choosing.
 
 
EES 79903: Ethnography of Space and Place [62250], GC: R, 11:45-1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Low, Course open to EES Students only
 
Introduction:  The study of the city has undergone a transformation during the past 20 years integrating ever wider theoretical perspectives from anthropology, cultural geography, political economy, urban sociology, and regional and city planning, and expanding its attention to the city as physical, architectural and virtual form.  An emphasis on spatial relations and consumption as well as urban planning and design decision-making provides new insights into material, ideological and metaphorical aspects of the urban environment.  Reliance on ethnography of space and place allows researchers to present an experience-near account of everyday life in urban housing or local markets, while at the same time addressing macro-processes such as globalization and the new urban social order.
This course sketches some of the methodological and theoretical implications of the ethnographic study of the contemporary city using anthropological tools of participant observation, interviewing, behavioral mapping, and theories of space and place to illuminate spaces in modern/post-modern cities and their transformations.  In doing so, I wish to underscore links between the shape, vision and experience of cities and the meanings that their citizens read off screens and streets into their own lives. It begins with a discussion of spatializing culture, that is the way that culture is produced and expressed spatially, and the way that space reflects and changes culture. The subsequent weeks explore different theoretical dimensions, embodied space, the social construction of space, the social production of space, language and discursive space, and digital or ambiguous space. The course also explores a number of special topics including how urban fear is transforming the built environment and the nature of public space both in the ways that we are conceiving the re/building our cities, and in the ways that residential suburbs are being transformed into gated and walled enclaves of private privilege and public exclusion.  The privatization of public space first signaled the profound changes that American cities are undergoing in terms of their physical, social and cultural design.  Currently, however, increased fear of violence and others particularly in urban areas is producing new community and public space forms; locked neighborhoods, blank faced malls in urban areas, armed guard dogs on public plazas, and limited access housing developments are just some examples of how the cultural mood is being “written” on the landscape.        
Course Requirements:
1. Weekly reading and discussion in class.  Each student will be assigned a week to present a reading review and act as the discussion facilitator.
2. Book review of an ethnography–both oral and written presentation. Oral presentations will be integrated with the theoretical and methodological content of weekly discussions.
3. Fieldwork project–both oral and written presentation. Students will participate in a fieldwork project related to the course using data collected and analyzed as part of the course content. The analysis will be presented at the conclusion as part of the final requirement to write a paper. Students will be asked to use theoretical materials from the course to recast or rethink their fieldwork projects for their final papers.
 
EES 79903: Constructing Urban Futures [62247], GC: T, 11:45 am – 1:45 p.m., 3 credits, Prof. Stabrowski, Course open to EES Students only
 
This seminar examines the urban development process under capitalism, paying particular attention to how visions of the future are constructed and harnessed for urban development projects, and how these visions intersect with capitalist processes of accumulation and dispossession. Grounded in urban geography, yet drawing from a wide range of disciplines, the seminar will explore how competing notions of the ideal city have shaped how urban areas are planned, built, governed, and inhabited. Each week, students will read monographs on particular urban futures such as: the military city; the green city; the creative city; the infrastructural city; and the migrant city. Case studies will draw from cities throughout the world. Participants will be expected to write a research proposal and to participate actively in reading and responding to each other’s work.
 
EES 79003: Reading the Grundrisse [62283], GC: T, 6:30 p.m. – 8:30, The People’s Forum, 3 credits, Prof. Harvey, Course open to EES Students only
 
The course entails a close reading of Marx's Grundrisse. 
 
French 87000 : On Affect (Passion, Sentiment, Emotion): In Theory, History, Texts, Professor Domna Stanton, Tuesday, 4:15pm-6:15pm, 2 or 4 Credits.
 
How are passions and emotions different from affects? How do bodies perform passions, sensibility, feelings, emotions and affects? What do affects do and how do they do it? How are they shaped by their contexts?  What is the meaning and significance of the “affective turn”?  Does it mark a rejection of the idea(l) of rational self-control? How is this turn connected to studies of women (and the feminine) and to work on gender and racial embodiments and sexualities?
 
This course will be structured around three areas: first, theories of affect and in tandem, a study of the cultural politics and ethics of specific affects, including anger, disgust, shame, compassion and happiness. Which emotions mobilize spectators/readers into collectives/communities. Are passions both a source and an obstacle to struggles for freedom and justice? How do they include and exclude? Among the theorists: Ahmed, Artaud, Berlant, Clough,  Cvetkovich, Deleuze and Guattari, Ghandi, M. Hardt, A. Lorde, Massumi, Scheer, Sedgwick, Stewart, M. Warner.
 
Second, we will grapple with the treatment of passions and emotions through history, especially in philosophy: from Aristotle and Cicero, Descartes, Pascal, Lebrun, Spinoza, and Kant to Darwin, W. James, Freud, Klein, and R. Williams.
 
And third, in conjunction with this philosophical and historical work, we will read texts (verbal, visual and musical) to see how they inscribe emotional content and how they generate affective responses from readers even when their semantics and narratives do not depict strong emotions. Is feeling as a response to cultural forms different from a human emotion? We will consider the cultural politics of emotion in the work of  Margerie of Kempe, Montaigne,  Gentileschi (Portraits of Judith) , Racine (Phedre),  Goethe (Sorrows of Young Werther), Wagner (“Leibestod”) , H. Jacobs (Life of a Slave Girl), H. James (Beast in the Jungle),  Woolf  (Mrs. Dalloway) , A. Nin (“Incest” Diary),  Lanzman ( Shoah),  Beckett (Happy Days), C. Churchill  (Far Away) , Irigaray (“When our Lips Speak Together”), Morrison (Beloved),  Darwish (Poems),  Labaki ( Capernaum), Moore (Watchman, 2019).
The syllabus will be uploaded onto Blackboard by the beginning of the spring semester; all course materials will be on blackboard, except for one or two complete texts which will be indicated on the syllabus.
 
Work for the course: Whether the course is taken for 2, 3, or 4 credits, all students will be responsible for doing the assigned texts closely and for engaging consistently in class discussion.
 
a, Students who take the course for 2 credits will present in class a reading of one primary text, which will also be submitted in writing (c 5-7 pp); these students will also take the final exam.
 
b, Students who take the course for 3 credits, will do all of the above, but instead of the 5-7 page paper, they will do a 10-13-page paper on a topic they select, after consultation with the instructor. They will also submit a thesis statement, a bibliography, an outline and the introduction (the schedule will be indicated on the syllabus).
 
c, Students who take the course for 4 credits will do all of the above, but instead of a 10-13 page paper, they will do a 20-25-page paper on a topic they select, after consultation with the instructor. They will also submit a thesis statement, a bibliography, an outline, and an introduction (the schedule will be indicated on the syllabus).
 
Please contact Domna Stanton with any questions (dstanton112@yahoo.com). 
 
French 71000 : Espaces, exclusions, identités de la fin du Moyen Âge jusqu’au XVIe siècle (taught in French), Professor Francesca Sautman, Wednesday, 6:30pm-8:30pm,  2 or 4 Credits.
 
Comment, entre la fin du Moyen Age et la Renaissance, les communautés et les individus qui en émanaient ou disaient les représenter, articulaient-ils les notions d’espace et d’identité au sein de l’écriture, provoquant des tensions avec les limites imposées par les contextes socio-politiques et avec d’autres référents expérientiels—ceux du genre [gender] par exemple ?
Parmi de nombreuses articulations possibles, certaines soulignent combien la conscience du soi, impliqué dans des identités historiquement précises ou dans les exclusions qui en dérivent (pour fait de religion, entre autres), est intimement reliée à la conscience des espaces (naturels, intérieurs) ou de lieux (quartiers, villes, régions, pays—soit eaux, mers, forêts, élévations, jardins…) et au poids qui leur est accordé dans ces écrits.
Ce sont les questions essentielles abordées par ce cours.
 
Dans sa Recepte véritable de 1563, le céramiste et savant autodidacte Bernard Palissy écrivait que le bois massacré par la coupe hâtive devrait crier d’être ainsi meurtri, se ressentant charnellement de sévices infligés par les exploiteurs humains, et de même, que la terre constamment maltraitée devrait se révolter contre ses meurtriers.
Cette vision de la nature, menacée, mutilée, souffrante et devant être protégée, était sans aucun doute originale et ne cesse de surprendre aujourd’hui— Palissy était pourtant aussi de son temps à bien des égards et en particulier, par une vision de la nature et de l’environnement rattachée à son identité de Protestant fidèle et persécuté. 
Le cheminement vers une telle pensée ne s’est pas effectué soudain, ni, à plus forte raison, le développement d’une perspective envers espaces et lieux marqués par une histoire individuelle ou collective, indissociables d’intégrations ou d’exclusions identitaires : lentement, et par des détours en eux-mêmes passionnants, ces idées ont pris forme depuis le Moyen Age.
 
Un texte comme la description du jardin dans la première partie du Roman de la Rose, celle de Guillaume de Lorris, situe bien la problématique de ce cours : évocation du lieu idéal, à la fois allégorique et poétique, son enjeu est de mettre en place un système d’adhésions et d’exclusions rigides—jeunesse-vieillesse, richesse-pauvreté—à travers une codification de l’ordre social entier où manque de pouvoir égale négativité morale. Autre exemple : Le Jeu de la Feuillée d’Adam de la Halle, œuvre majeure du théâtre ancien, déjà innovatrice, où la notion médiévale de congé poétique, marquant le seuil d’une séparation dramatique (comme la séquestration pour cause de maladie) est contiguë à l’évocation de lieux familiers et étranges et de multiples formes d’altérité sociale. Avec Villon, on tourne le dos à la nature, et l’espace est nettement urbain, marqué par des lieux précis, historiques ou métaphoriques, mais bel et bien occupés par les identités de la marge. Avec Marguerite de Navarre, nous considérons la violence des espaces intérieurs, leurs liens aux affects et à une nature reconnue mais hostile, et comment ils formulent une identité à la fois personnelle et communautaire.
Le cours vous propose donc d’explorer cette pensée de l’espace/identité, ses écarts et ses tendances, ses théories, ses avancées, ses manques et ses contradictions, depuis le Moyen Age central jusqu’à la fin du 16e siècle, à travers une douzaine de textes tant littéraires que polémiques ou didactiques.
 
Textes étudiés : Chrétien de Troyes ( ?1130-1194), Perceval ou le conte du Graal ; Guillaume de Lorris (c. 1200-c. 1240), Roman de la Rose 1, introduction ; Adam de la Halle, Le Jeu de la Feuillée (entre 1285 et 1288) ; Christine de Pizan (1364-c. 1430) Le Livre de la Mutacion de Fortune (sections) ; François Villon (1431-c. 1463), Le Testament ; Clément Marot (1496-1544), L’ Enfer ; Marguerite de Navarre (1492-1549) Miroir de l’âme pècheresse ; Bernard Palissy (1510-c. 1590) Recepte véritable par laquelle tous les hommes de la France pourront apprendre à multiplier et augmenter leurs thrésors; Guillaume Postel (1510-1581) L’Histoire memorable des expéditions depuys le deluge faictes par les Gauloys ;  Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592), sections du Journal de Voyage, et deux essais, « De l’Exercitation » et « Des Cannibales »; Agrippa d’Aubigné (1552-1630), sections du Livre I des Tragiques.
La durée d’un semestre limitant le choix de textes possibles, les textes principaux seront encadrés de manière à vous fournir un contexte plus vaste, par les lectures critiques, notes de préparation des cours, outils bibliographiques et documents visuels.
 
L’approche aux textes est fondée à la fois sur 1) les travaux critiques récents d’écocritique, d’études du concept de nation et des faits de colonisation, et sur la formation de la conscience de soi au Moyen Age et à la Renaissance; 2)  et sur un ensemble de textes théoriques et philosophiques modernes, dont Jane Bennett (« vibrant matter ») ; Patrick Boucheron (histoire globale et comparée), George Didi-Huberman (culture visuelle, identités, mémoire de la souffrance), Michel de Certeau (histoire et délégitimiser le pouvoir) ; Maurice Merleau-Ponty (perception, affect, environnement) et Emmanuel Levinas (éthique, nature, environnement).
Travail requis : pour 4 crédits, devoir écrit de mi-trimestre ; une préparation orale (à préciser en fonction du nombre d’inscrits dans le cours) ; un travail de recherche final substantiel, 25 pages environ. Participation : en classe et aussi électronique, « blog » à travers le site Blackboard du cours ; vous serez invité-e-s à y partager avec les autres membres du cours vos réactions, des idées sur les discussions du cours ainsi que des détails sur votre propre projet (vous avez le choix de ce que vous voulez bien mettre en ligne pour la classe).
 
2 crédits : un midterm (version courte), et soit une préparation orale, soit un 2e devoir écrit court,
Students outside the French Program on a 3-credit system ­ their own program: see 4 credits, but final paper can be 15 to 10 pages, and blog is optional.
 
Students outside of the French Program: students in programs other than French are welcome in the course but must be able to do most (not all) of their readings in French and follow class presentations and discussions in French. They may, however, do all their work (including oral presentations and interventions in class conversations) in English.
 
A pre-syllabus (course work details, class meeting topics and main readings, some bibliographical tools) should be available by the end of the Fall semester so that you can read during January. Please check Blackboard site for early postings.
 
HIST 75500 : Sojourners, Sultans, and Slaves: Slavery and Freedom in North America and the Indian Ocean, GC: Wednesdays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Gunja SenGupta 
 
        As the 19th century dawned, global systems of capitalism and empire knit the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds into international networks of trade and travel, and conquest and colonization, of labor and capital, and politics and ideology. The controversies over slavery,colonialism, and freedom’s meanings that resulted from this integration, offer U.S. scholars an analytical framework for “cross-fertilizing” national histories, historiographies, and epistemologies, with the burgeoning scholarship on the Indian Ocean. This course introduces students to transnational and comparative perspectives that illuminate the interoceanic scale of the Anglophone contexts in which Americans engaged with the politics and representations of slavery, abolition and empire.
           Such engagements emerged in a moment of transition between empires in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds during the 18th century. The backdrop against which they occurred, however, was shaped by developments that date as far back as what European historians would consider early modern periods in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds.  So we will begin there, reflecting, as we proceed to the 19th century,  on questions like:  how exceptional was “American” slavery, and its relationship with notions of freedom? How did British colonial traditions of legal pluralism translate in the Indian Ocean world? How do we theorize “agency,” “diaspora,” and “difference,” in African diasporic history, and evaluate scholarly debates over the boundaries between law and practice, family and the market, and nation and empire within that history? In what ways did “subaltern” migrations remake identities and produce change? How did free labor experiments in British Asia influence debates over sectionalism in the U.S.? What do the struggles of American slaveholders in Indian Ocean Sultanates over land, labor, cultural politics, and international power rivalries tell us about comparative slavery histories?
We will  grapple with these questions by placing U.S. historiography in dialogue with scholarship and multinational archival materials on slavery and freedom in the Indian Ocean, comparing, for instance, the Atlantic slave trade with human trafficking on the Trans-Saharan and Arabia Sea routes; considering the ways in which tropes of difference (race, religion, class, caste, gender, sex) and ideas about dependence (especially kinship) shaped ideologies and practices of “master-slave” relationships; discussing the workings of the state, law, political economy, religious institutions, and demography, in constructing systems of bondage,  hierarchy and patronage; considering how formal institutions and informal customs influenced marginalized people’s material conditions, and regulated their access to community membership/citizenship; examining the dynamics of “subaltern” family, culture, community, and resistance; tracing the transoceanic circulation of debates over slavery and poverty, and abolition and empire; and contextualizing emancipation in the U.S, within the framework of comparative chronicles of freedom.
 
HIST 74900: Race, Gender and American Political Development, GC: Tuesdays, 11:45 am - 1:45 pm, 3 credits, Profs. David Waldstreicher & Ruth O’Brien
 
This course explores persistent binaries that have arguably structured political thought and practice in the United States. On the one hand, the U.S. has been imagined as a place where people can rise through merit and opportunity, unconstrained by the oppressions of the past and of other places. Geographic mobility – settlement, migration, immigration – is mapped on to social mobility in the accepted meaning of the phrase “American Dream.” Yet U.S. history is marked by war and violence, to such a striking extent that scholars and pundits have periodically diagnosed the culture as peculiarly, even uniquely violent. Given the recent resurgence of angry and martial rhetoric at the center of national politics, how might we understand the relationship between the revolutionary or Enlightenment dreams of progress on the one hand, and the recurrent dread or nightmare of decline and oppression, as shaping facts of specifically political traditions? To what extent, in what ways, are exceptionalist understandings of U.S. political traditions a problem or a solution? Do accounts that stress race, or gender, or the confluence of the two, provide a necessary or sufficient theory or counternarrative of political development? Do frameworks developed in European politics, in critical theory, postcolonial thought, or in domestic vernaculars comprehend the dream/dread in the past and present? What kinds of analytical scholarship and storytelling have been adequate to the task?
 
HIST 72400: The Political Thought of Hannah Arendt, GC: Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm, 3 credits, Prof. Richard Wolin
 
In the annals of twentieth-century political thought, Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) carved out a unique and enduring niche. Today, some 40 years after her death, her political philosophy seems more relevant than ever. In 1951, she wrote the first important book on totalitarianism, perhaps the central political problem of the twentieth century. Seven years later, Arendt published her landmark contribution to European political thought, the Human Condition, in which she seeks to probe and to delineate the existential bases of human freedom. Avoiding the liberal political idiom of "rights," Arendt broaches this theme in terms of the ontological values of "plurality" and "action" – constituents of human distinctiveness that Arendt traces back to the glories of Periclean Athens. Nevertheless, she also found important modern political corollaries to "action" in the fleeting experience of direct (that is, non-representative) democracy: in the notion of "local democracy" that flourished in pre-revolutionary America and in the emergence of "workers consuls" in the course of the European revolutions of 1905, 1918, and 1956.
 
Our main thematic focus will concern Arendt’s central contributions to twentieth century political thought: The Origins of Totalitarianism (1951), The Human Condition (1958), and On Revolution (1962). However, as preparation for this encounter, attention to Arendt’s formative philosophical and political influences is indispensable. Therefore, in conjunction with these works, we will also selectively read a number of background texts that will assist us in clarifying the conceptual framework that Arendt develops in her mature political works. Essential in this regard are key texts by Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics) and by Arendt’s legendary German mentor, Martin Heidegger (Being and Time). At specific junctures, Arendt’s voluminous correspondence with another celebrated mentor, Karl Jaspers, will also guide us.
 
Finally, the “Arendt renaissance” of recent years has been punctuated by important cinematic representations of her life and thought – a dimension of the international Hannah Arendt reception story that we will analyze and reflect upon in conclusion.
 
HIST 72100: Key Concepts in the Western Tradition, GC: Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15 pm, Room TBA, 3 credits, Prof. Helena Rosenblatt
 
In recent decades there has been a new development in the academic study of political and social thought. Much attention is now being paid to “key concepts” and their historicity. The so-called “linguistic turn” has played an important role in this process.
By “key concepts” we mean the big ideas and indispensable terms without which it would be virtually impossible to engage in any meaningful political discussion. We use such concepts daily to make sense of our world and communicate with others. And yet, as scholars today are increasingly realizing, the meanings of these concepts are not static or timeless. They are constantly evolving and being contested. Key concepts can be seen as tools and weapons wielded at specific times for specific political purposes.
In this course we will examine the meaning and evolution of a number of key concepts essential to our current vocabulary, among which “democracy”, “populism” and “liberalism,” as well as “happiness,” “fear,” “genius” and “woman”. We will consider questions such as the following: What did “democracy” mean to the ancient Greeks and what does it mean to us today? How does our notion of “genius” compare to that of the Renaissance? When and why was the word “liberalism” coined and how has its meaning changed over time? Has our understanding of “woman” remained the same across the centuries?
 
SPAN 87000: The Neoliberal Promise of Happiness and Ugly Feelings: Post-Utopic Fiction and Film from Central America, GC: Tuesday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Prof. Magdalena Perkowska
 
In The Promise of Happiness (2010), Sara Ahmed critically addresses the promise of happiness that circulates in globalized society, defining people’s attitudes and expectations. She argues that, as on object of individual and social desire, happiness may mean agreement, going along or even willfully submitting to social norms. In this way, happiness can be used as a shield against the recognition of and engagement with political and social alternatives. In contrast, unhappiness and negativity are affective points of disagreement and, as such, judgmental and non-conforming.
Ugly feelings, as defined by Sianne Ngai in her eponymous study (2005), are “minor and generally unprestigious” emotions of a strong, diagnostic nature, because they have capacity of shedding light on “a real social experience and a certain kind of historical truth.” Central American cultural texts (novels, short stories and films) produced during the last two decades are full of such feelings: disenchantment, bitterness, anguish, anxiety, fear, disdain, frustration, sorrow, pain, melancholia, loss, and confusion are signifiers of disappointment with past utopias and present neoliberal restoration or reaffirmation of market capitalism. This course explores a selection of Central American fictions and films which will be read in conjunction with theoretical approaches to affect and emotions (Phillip Fischer, Sianne Ngai, Sara Ahmed, Ann Cvetkovich, Lauren Berlant, Ruth Leys, Martha Nussbaum, among others), neoliberalism (David Harvey, Wendy Brown), and politics and aesthetics (Rancière).  We will examine unresolved tensions articulated through affects and emotions, and will fathom what commitments, if any, are encoded in these ‘feeling texts.’
 
SPAN 87000: Raiding the Archive: Strategies from the Latin American Narrative Tradition, GC: Wednesday, 4:15-6:15 p.m., Prof. Carlos Riobó
 
In this course, we will analyze major theories concerning the archive (such as those by Foucault, Derrida, Guillory, González Echevarría, and those relating to biological and digital media--by Žižek, Lanier, and applications of Badiou) in order to understand how the archive figures in modern Latin American narrative. We will first examine passages from canonical works, such as Gómez de Avellaneda’s Sab, Rivera’s La vorágine, Gallegos’s Doña Bárbara, and García Márquez’s Cien años de soledad, to understand the major intertexts embedded in our main corpus. We will then study eclectic notions of the archive as both repository and threat, in our main corpus of texts: archival dangers in Carlos Fuentes’s Aura, Kijadurías’s “De hijos suyos podernos llamar,” Ferré’s “La muñeca menor,” Sarduy’s Colibrí, and Borges’s “La biblioteca de Babel”/“El idioma analítico de John Wilkins”; archive of memory in Bolaño’s Nocturno de Chile and Padura Fuentes’s Adiós, Hemingway; and writing as punishment/pleasure in the archive in Puig’s El beso de la mujer araña and Sarduy’s Maitreya and “Omítemela más.” The course will be conducted in Spanish but students may participate in class and write their papers in English.

MUS 83100: Seminar in Ethnomusicology: Readings in Musical Ethnography, GC: Wednesdays, 10 a.m.- 1 p.m., 3 credits, Professor Jane Sugarman

In this seminar we will read a selection of recent monographs in ethnomusicology in occasional alternation with pertinent background readings. One course goal will be to take a measure of current topics and approaches in the field and evaluate the state of ethnomusicological research. Another will be to use these monographs to consider approaches to researching and writing a book- (AKA dissertation-) length study, including research design and theoretical framework, analysis of materials gathered during research, writing strategies and authorial “voice,” and issues of representation and ethics. Before the course begins, I will circulate a list of monographs from which we will select the final reading list. Students will be asked to respond to each week’s reading assignment by posting on a Blackboard discussion thread. The final project will consist of drafting a mock (or real) research proposal. Permission of instructor required.

MUS 84200: Seminar in Theory/Analysis: Studies in Musical Semiotics, GC: Wednesdays, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., 3 credits, Professor Kofi Agawu

A brisk introduction to the field of musical semiotics followed by a series of analytical exercises and critical commentaries. Topics include music and/as language, iconicity, introversive versus extroversive semiosis, paradigmatic analysis and musical narrative. A final paper will be required.

MUS 84300: Seminar in Theory/Analysis: Schenker II, GC: Wednesdays. 2 – 5 p.m., 3 credits, Professor William Rothstein

A practicum on Heinrich Schenker’s analytical method, focusing on instrumental music from Bach to Chopin and Brahms. Weekly analysis assignments will be supplemented by readings. In the last weeks of the semester, each student will make an oral presentation on a piece chosen by the student and approved by the instructor

MUS 84100: Seminar in Theory/Analysis: Analysis of Pop and Rock Music, GC: Mondays, 6:30– 9:00 p.m., 3 credits, Professor Mark Spicer

This seminar will offer an intensive study of the myriad stylistic trends in pop and rock music that have emerged over roughly the last sixty years, what might be described as the “postBeatles” era, with particular focus on the 1970s and 1980s. A wide range of issues in the analysis of recorded popular music will be addressed, including: (1) the inadequacies of traditional music notation in conveying this music graphically; (2) the pros and cons of applying techniques normally reserved for the analysis of Western art music to popular music; and (3) the problems inherent in locating “meaning” in pop and rock songs. Our central text will be David Temperley’s The Musical Language of Rock (Oxford, 2018), but along the way, we will explore the rapidly growing body of scholarship in popular music analysis. Coursework will involve weekly reading and listening assignments, weekly short papers in response to the reading and listening, and a substantial final conference-style paper (which may take many shapes or forms, but typically students will present close analyses of a song or group of songs of their own choosing). Limited to doctoral students in music, or with special permission of the instructor.

MUS 86100: Seminar in Musicology: Adorno on Music, GC: Tuesdays, 2:00 – 5:00 p.m., 3 credits, Professor Chadwick Jenkins

This course will examine the writings and thought of critical theorist Theodor W. Adorno. While the emphasis will be on his many monographs and essays pertaining to music, we will read those works within the context of the larger scope of his thought. Thus, we will also read substantial portions of the Dialectic of the Enlightenment (co-authored with Max Horkheimer), and a few passages from Negative Dialectics, and Aesthetic Theory. Our emphasis, chronologically, will be on his work from the 1920s to the 1940s. Topics of discussion will include: the nature of "truth content" as a heuristic for understanding and evaluating musical works; the social nature of musical material; the role of form (in both the Kantian sense and with respect to structure); the political use (and abuse) of music; Adorno's understanding of mimesis and mediation; the role of musical analysis in Adorno's thought; the position of music within the administered society; the problems surrounding the image of music as an emblem of emancipation; and the notion of "failure" as a critical tool for investigating music. In conjunction with the writings of Adorno, we will also examine excerpts from the works of Max Horkheimer, Walter Benjamin, Karl Marx, GWF Hegel, and György Lukács insofar as Adorno draws on and critiques their ideas. Selected essays and books from the secondary literature will also be assigned. Students will be asked to prepare short responses to selected readings that will be shared and discussed with the class as a whole. Furthermore, students will write one short paper that presents an "Adornian" critique of a piece of music of the student's choosing and one long paper on a topic chosen by the student in conference with the instructor.

PHIL 78600: Decolonial Feminist Ethics and Epistemology, Profs. Alcoff & Khader, 4 credits. Mon. 4:15-6:15
 
This course explores the influence of regimes of colonization, racialization, and imperialism on conceptions of gender justice. It begins from the understanding of decolonial feminist philosophies as including both critical and constructive projects: the former involve exploring the ways Western concepts and histories promote a congruence between Western feminism and Western imperialism, and the latter involve constructing alternative visions of solidarity, as well as local and global gender justice.
 
Developing feminist solidarity and coalition requires an analysis of epistemic justice, or the roadblocks to mutual engagement with respect and reciprocity between differently situated groups. Feminist solidarity also requires thinking through the narrow definitions of rationality found sometimes in the West, in which, as an example, secularism is assumed to be more rational in an a priori way, and the political history and economic context of scientific inquiry are ignored. Hence, this course will pursue both epistemological and ethical aspects of transnational feminism.
 
We will also discuss and analyze links between gender formations and colonial conquest and settlement, changing patterns of violence against women, and racializing discourses and knowledge regimes, to challenge dominant understandings of knowledge and law, agency and politics. We will also explore the philosophical theories for pluralizing a vision of women’s liberation. Some of the topics we will discuss include: the influence of the concept of modernity on conceptions of transnational justice and gender justice, the role of the concept of culture in feminist discourses, the difference between decolonial, postcolonial, and transnational feminist theoretical approaches, how to overcome racist and sexist patterns of epistemic prejudice, the idea that gender itself is a colonial imposition, and the ideal/non-ideal theory distinction.
 
PHIL 77700: Neglected Topics in the Philosophy of Art and Aesthetics, Prof. Carroll, 4 credits
Tues. 11:45-1:45
 
As in virtually every other area of philosophy, in aesthetics certain topics dominate the spotlight while others are neglected. Among the arts literature, music, and perhaps film receive the lion’s share of attention, while architecture, dance, theater, and television are discussed less. In terms of genre, tragedy is pre-eminent, while horror, melodrama, and comedy remain more in the shadows. And so on. This course will explore a selection of certain of these less examined topics.
 
For roughly the first half of the semester, discussion will be led by the instructor who will introduce classes on humor, theater, dance, and architecture. The second half will involve student presentations on neglected topics drawn either from a menu of suggested topics or on topics of the student’s own interests in consultation with the instructor. The course requirements include a participation in discussion, a class presentation, and a final paper that may be based on the class presentation or a topic of the student’s own design in consultation with the instructor.
 
Warning: the course will be highly disjunctive; there will be no overarching thesis knitting all the topics together. There are no prerequisites.
 
PHIL 77300: Linguistic Pragmatism, Prof. Devitt, 4 credits, Tues. 6:30-8:30
 
An exciting development in recent philosophy of language has been the debate surrounding “linguistic pragmatism” and “linguistic contextualism”. Paul Grice is the founding father of this movement. Its seminal work is Dan Sperber and Deirdre Wilson’s Relevance. Contributions to the debate to be examined in the seminar include those by Kent Bach, Robyn Carston, François Récanati, John Searle, Stephen Neale and others. The course aims, first, to look critically at competing methodologies at work in the debate, and second, to tackle substantive issues about the semantic properties of a range of linguistic expressions and constructions.
 
The folk distinguish what a person says in uttering something from what the person means, from the intended message. Almost everyone thinks the folk are on to something with this distinction. Grice’s distinction between what is said and what is implicated is based on it, as is Sperber and Wilson’s distinction between explicature and implicature. And there are other similar distinctions. These distinctions raise many questions. What is the principled basis for putting something on one side rather than the other? Is it appropriate to rely on intuitions in making judgments of this sort? If not, what? Is a distinction of this sort to be found in nonlinguistic communication? How much truth is there in claims that what is said constituted by things other than linguistic convention—for example, context, common ground, conversational maxims, nonlinguistic norms, and the contents of beliefs and intentions relevant to resolving potential lexical, structural, referential, and anaphoric ambiguities and potential cases of underspecification? What substance is there in the claim made by some pragmatists that “truth-conditional semantics” should be replaced by “truth-conditional pragmatics”? What hangs on this difference between “pragmatics” and “semantics”? Most important of all: Why is any distinction in question theoretically interesting? What role does it play in theoretical explanations of linguistic phenomena?
 
This is not an introduction to the philosophy of language. Anyone wishing to enroll who is not a philosophy graduate student or who is new to the philosophy of language should consult with me beforehand.
 
Requirements
 
A brief weekly email raising questions about, making criticisms of, or developing points concerning, matters discussed in the class and reading for that week. 50% of grade.
 
A class presentation based on a draft for a paper (topic chosen in consultation with me).
 
The draft to be submitted by the Monday prior to the presentation. 20% of grade.
 
A 2,500 word paper probably arising from the draft in (ii). 30% of grade.
 
PHIL 77600: Contractarianism and its Critics, Prof. Mills, 4 credits, Mon. 6:30-8:30
 
This course will look at classic social contract theory—Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Kant—which was dramatically revived as a result of John Rawls’s 1971 A Theory of Justice. We will try to get clear on both the important commonalities in their divergent versions of the “contract” as a way of understanding the creation of society, the polity, and people’s resulting obligations, and the crucial differences among their versions. We will then turn to some of the criticisms of the contract idea, whether the classic “communitarian” critique or critiques oriented by gender, racial, and disability concerns.
 
PHIL 76600: Philosophical Issues in Archaeology, Prof. Neale, 4 credits, Mon. & Tues. 4:15-6:15 [NOTE: This course meets twice a week for half the semester, from January 27 to March 16.]
 
Work in archaeology and palaeoanthropology raises questions in the philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology, cognitive science, linguistics and the philosophy of language, aesthetics, ethics, law, and political theory. These include questions about archaeological evidence, inference, explanation and interpretation; scientific realism; laws and generalizations; notions of artifact, context, site, archaeological record, and culture; typology and classification; chronology, measurement and calibration; the emergence of intentional, symbolic, and communicative behavior; looting, dealing, and collecting; ownership, cultural property and public policy.
 
Even with a good spread of topics, we can address only a few of these in one semester and for the second half of the semester the topics selected will depend upon the composition of the class. In the past, enrollment has been split evenly between philosophy and archaeology PhD students, and the (revisable) starting assumption will be that students are not well-versed in one another’s fields.
 
Phil 77200: Emotion, Prof. Prinz, 4 credits, Tues. 2:00-4:00
 
This seminar investigates the nature and the roles of emotions from an interdisciplinary perspective.
 
The first unit surveys competing theories of emotion, including biologically-based theories, embodied theories, cognitive theories and constructionism. Through this unit, we will also consider the question of the status of emotions as natural kinds.
 
The second investigates work on specific emotions. We will consider emotions that are thought to play roles in evaluative contexts, including morality and art, emotions alleged to be culturally specific, and some neglected emotions, ones that play epistemic roles such as doubt, interest, boredom, confidence, and wonder.
 
The third unit examines ways in which emotions can be assessed: Are emotions ir/rational? Are they appropriate or not? And according to what criteria? Should some emotions be abandoned (such as shame and anger), regulated, and how? How long should they last?
 
The fourth unit questions the relationships of emotions with other cognitive states. Are emotions some types of perception? What is the intentionality of emotions? Are they always directed at objects? Of what kind? Are they always conscious? What would be an unconscious emotion?
 
The final unit examines emotional deviance and psychopathology. We will consider several possible ways in which some emotional processes can qualify as pathological, including emotional disorders, such as phobias, post-traumatic stress, depression, and social anxiety. as well as conditions that have been characterized as involving emotional deficits such as psychopathy and autism. Though this lens, we will explore processes of emotion recognition, emotional understanding, emotion regulation, and emotional consciousness.
 
Though philosophical readings will outnumber the rest, we will also read perspectives from several other fields including, psychology, neuroscience, and sociology.
 
This seminar will be conducted together with Sarah Arnaud, an emotion researcher and postdoc in the Philosophy Program.
 
PHIL 76100: Hobbes & Spinoza, Prof. Steinberg, 4 credits, Weds. 11:45-1:45
 
Thomas Hobbes and Benedict Spinoza occupy antipodal political positions: the former is the preeminent seventeenth-century defender of absolute monarchy, while the latter is a champion of democracy and civil liberties. Nevertheless, they share a lot in common. They both seek to articulate accounts of cognition, emotion, moral motivation, authority, and social ontology within the constraints of an anti-teleological naturalism. And they even share many specific theses concerning the metaphysics of desire, the ground of moral judgments, and the natural limits of obligation. This is no accident. Spinoza was a careful reader of Hobbes who often adopted Hobbesian premises in order to draw conclusions that he could wield against his revered predecessor. In this seminar, we will study the chief works of these two thinkers, seeking to understand how their respective accounts of metaphysics, psychology, and politics are supposed to hang together. We will pay special attention to their views on causality, the nature of mind, the affects, moral judgment, liberty, power, law, and the conditions of citizenship.
 
PHIL 76000: Aristotle and Neo-Aristotelian Virtue Ethics, Prof. Vasiliou, 4 credits, Mon. & Tues. 4:15-6:15
 
 [NOTE: This course meets twice a week for half the semester, from March 23 through May 12.]
 
According to most standard accounts, modern virtue ethics begins with Elizabeth Anscombe's essay "Modern Moral Philosophy" in 1958 and develops over the second half of the twentieth century as an alternative to deontological and consequentialist moral theories. Rather than obligation as the centerpiece of moral theory, it is commonly held that virtue ethics focuses on human flourishing and the virtues of character that constitute it. Aristotle is the patron saint of this movement. Over the last twenty years, some have begun to question what virtue ethics is, how and whether it differs from other types of ethical theory, and even to what extent Aristotle should be called a virtue ethicist. Some now avoid the term “virtue-ethics” and prefer to speak instead of “Neo-Aristotelian” ethics; under this label one might include the work of Julia Annas, Phillipa Foot, Rosalind Hursthouse, Alasdair MacIntyre, John McDowell, Martha Nussbaum, and Michael Thompson. While all of these philosophers discuss virtue, only some would identify their positions as belonging to “virtue ethics.”
 
We shall examine what sort of ethical theory contemporary Neo-Aristotelian ethics is and how it fits with what we actually find in Aristotle. What does it say about the relationships between agents and actions? How does it contrast with deontology or consequentialism? What does it mean for ethics to be "virtue-based", "character-based" or "agent-based/centered", as opposed to "rule-based" or "act-based/centered"? What is the role of (human) nature in Neo-Aristotelian ethics? Does practical reason operate differently in Neo-Aristotelian ethics than in other types of ethical theory?
 
We will do a close reading of major parts of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, including his discussions of eudaimonia, the virtues of character, practical reason, moral psychology, decision and deliberation, voluntary action, and the unity of virtues. We will interweave this with readings from secondary literature on the Ethics as well as from the “Neo-Aristotelians” mentioned above.
 
It will be important for us to work from the same translation of the Nicomachean Ethics. For various reasons, we shall use Terence Irwin's translation, second edition, Hackett Press; I ask you all to acquire a copy. We will also consult the Rowe/Broadie translation from Oxford, and the "Revised Oxford Translation" by Ross and revised by Urmson, published in the Complete Works of Aristotle (ed. J. Barnes, Princeton University Press). Please read Book I of the Nicomachean Ethics for the first class. First class will meet on 3/23, not 3/17 (there will be a make-up class, TBA). Philosophy students wishing to satisfy Distribution Area D-ancient with this seminar must write a term paper that focuses on Aristotle’s ethics.
 
PSC 72009: Gender, Race and American Political Development (AP), O’Brien & Waldstreicher, 3 credits, Tuesday 11:45am–1:45pm
 
Cross list: HIST 74600, WSCP 81000
 
This course explores persistent binaries that have arguably structured political thought and practice in the United States. On the one hand, the U.S. has been imagined as a place where people can rise through merit and opportunity, unconstrained by the oppressions of the past and of other places. Geographic mobility – settlement, migration, immigration – is mapped on to social mobility in the accepted meaning of the phrase “American Dream.” Yet U.S. history is marked by war and violence, to such a striking extent that scholars and pundits have periodically diagnosed the culture as peculiarly, even uniquely violent.
 
Given the recent resurgence of angry and martial rhetoric at the center of national politics, how might we understand the relationship between the revolutionary or Enlightenment dreams of progress on the one hand, and the recurrent dread or nightmare of decline and oppression, as shaping facts of specifically political traditions? To what extent, in what ways, are exceptionalist understandings of U.S. political traditions a problem or a solution? Do accounts that stress race, or gender, or the confluence of the two, provide a necessary or sufficient theory or counter narrative of political development? Do frameworks developed in European politics, in critical theory, postcolonial thought, or in domestic vernaculars comprehend the dream/dread in the past and present? What kinds of analytical scholarship and storytelling have been adequate to the task?
 
PSC 71901: Contemporary Political Theory (PT), Prof. Marasco, 3 credits, Monday 11:45am–1:45pm (Cross list with WSCP 81000)
 
This course provides a rigorous introduction to major works of political theory in the twentieth century. Our seminar will proceed as close readings of whole books and essays, on the assumption that political theory is best digested in non-excerpted form and that a different group of interpretive muscles are flexed when we linger on a work in its (exhaustive and exhausting) entirety.
 
Readings will include works by Carl Schmitt, Leo Strauss, Hannah Arendt, CLR James, Theodor Adorno, Louis Althusser, Gilles Deleuze & Felix Guattari, John Rawls, Catherine MacKinnon, and Jacques Ranciere. This seminar is designed primarily for Political Science graduate students preparing a concentration in political theory, but it is also open to students in Philosophy, Anthropology, Sociology, Women’s Studies, and related fields. This seminar will be especially useful for students preparing for their comprehensive exams in political theory.
 
By the end of the semester, you should expect to:
 
• Distinguish among various approaches to contemporary political theory and the traditions upon which they build.
• Develop reading & writing skills and, especially, the capacity to build compelling, arguments on major thinkers and topics in contemporary political theory.
• Acquire the foundations for preparation of the contemporary political theory portion of your comprehensive exam in political theory.
 
 
PSC 80602: Benjamin as Method (PT), Prof. Buck-Morss, 4 credits, Tuesday 2:00pm–4:00pm
 
In-depth readings of a wide range of Walter Benjamin’s writings in historical-political context, from World War I and the Bolshevik Revolution, to World War II and the Vichy Regime. We will focus on philosophical method. What in his way of working escapes certain modern and post-modern dead-ends of theory? Excerpts from all five volumes of his Selected Works will be consulted.
 
PSC 80304: Ancient Greek Political Thought (PT), Prof. Mehta, 4 credits, Wednesday 2:00pm–4:00pm
 
This course will offer an introduction to the political thought of Plato and Aristotle; it is organized around important and classic texts of the Western philosophic tradition. The questions that will structure this course will include: Why is the study of politics and ethics something about which we need and can have general theories? What is the status of an “ideal” polity with respect to actual polities? What do the thinkers take to be the original motivation underlying the formation of political society? How do these motivations conform to the normative prescriptions that they propose? How do notions such as friendship and virtue relate to the understanding of citizenship? What are the justifications underlying the various proposed institutional arrangements and under what conditions can these arrangements be legitimately suspended? Finally, does the organizing of political life of necessity do violence to a more noble conception of human potentiality?
 
PSC 71906: Machiavelli (PT), Prof. Fontana, 3 credits, Thursday 6:30pm–8:30pm
 
This course will focus on Machiavelli and his interpreters. It will engage his thought through a close reading of his major political works, The Prince, the Discourses and The Art of War, as well as some of his minor works, The Life of Castruccio Castracani, A Provision for Infantry, Discourse on Remodeling the Government of Florence, the Tercets on Ambition and On Fortune. There is no need to underline the importance of such a course for a student of politics and of political theory. That he has had a broad and profound influence on political thought cannot be denied. He has been called teacher of evil, founder of modernity, partisan of republicanism, defender of tyranny, discoverer of a new science of politics, amoral realist and impassioned idealist. The very ambiguity (and popularity) of the term “Machiavellian” testifies to the range and depth of this influence. In addition, the course will examine different interpretations, or different ways of reading, Machiavelli—such as reason of state, republican, democratic, Straussian, rhetorical and revolutionary. In effect, the course will offer a reading of several of Machiavelli’s writings, and it will at the same time delve into the various approaches to, and interpretations of, his politics and thought.
 
PSC 71908 (Crosslist with HIST. 72400): The Political Thought of Hannah Arendt (PT), Prof. Wolin, 3 credits, Monday 6:30pm–8:30pm
 
Since her untimely death in 1975, Hannah Arendt’s stature as a political thinker has increased exponentially. In 1950 she authored the first important study of totalitarianism – a work that, today, among scholars remains an indispensable point of reference. In the late 1950s and early 1960s she published, in rapid succession, a series of path breaking works that consolidated her reputation as one of the twentieth-century’s most significant and innovative political philosophers: the Human Condition (1958), On Revolution (1962), and Eichmann in Jerusalem (1963). During the 1920s she studied philosophy with the two titans of German existentialism, Martin Heidegger and Karl Jaspers, and she played an indispensable role in introducing their ideas to the English-speaking world. During her Paris exile, she befriended the literary critic Walter Benjamin and helped to introduce his work to an American public. Arendt also excelled as a letter writer and as a public intellectual, contributing regularly to Partisan Review and the New York Review of Books. She has been the subject of numerous biographical and academic studies. Plays and films have been devoted to her fascinating intellectual itinerary.
 
In Germany there are not one, but two think tanks devoted to her work (Hamburg and Dresden). And during the 1990s, also in the country of her birth, she received the ultimate accolade: a high-speed train was named in her honor. As a thinker Arendt never shied away from taking risks – “thinking without bannisters,” she called it. Aspects of her work have proved controversial: above all, her employment of the epithet, “the banality of evil,” to describe Adolf Eichmann’s role in the Final Solution. In our course, we will focus primarily on Arendt’s contributions as a political thinker, in major works such as Origins of Totalitarianism, The Human Condition, and On Revolution. But we will also consider her status and role as a flashpoint for some of the major intellectual controversies and debates of her time – and ours.
 
SOC 85200: Transnational Social Movements, Prof. Carolina Bank Muñoz, 3 credits, Thursdays, 2:00- 4:00pm
 
In this course, we will explore the global response to the rise of neoliberalism and austerity politics. While social movements in the U.S. are significantly weaker than they were in the 1960s and 1970s, there has been an explosion in global and transnational movements.  We will largely focus on labor, human rights, climate change and anti-globalization movements.  In analyzing transnational social movements, we will consider such questions as: How did these movements arise?  Are transnational social movements effective responses to globalization and neoliberalism? What are the limitations of transnational social movements? How do transnational social movements negotiate race, class and gender? And how have the rise of South-South movements challenged the power imbalances in transnational organizing?
Over the past decade, the global population of forcibly displaced people – as a result of persecution, conflict, violence, or human rights violations – grew substantially from 43.3 million in 2009 to 70.8 million in 2018, reaching a record high. This course is designed to give students an understanding of the major causes of contemporary migration and population displacement. Global, regional, and national processes contributing to and driving refugee and migration flows will be examined. Students will consider a range of critical issues and factors contributing to displacement, particularly under conditions of poverty, uneven development, competition for resources, political instability, weak governance, violence, environmental degradation, and natural disasters. International challenges including human rights, human trafficking, citizenship, and statelessness will be addressed as well.
 
SOC 82800: Capitalism, Race and Class, Prof. Charles Post, 3 credits, Mondays, 6:30-8:30 pm
 
The dominant “common sense” in the United States holds that this country, unique among all industrialized capitalist countries, has no fixed and permanent social classes and affords equal opportunity for social advancement to all its citizens. However, the reality is quite different. Social class divisions and racial inequality have marked US society from its birth in the 17th century, and these divisions grow sharper today. The problem of the relationship between these two fundamental forms of social inequality and power in the US has long been the subject of theoretical and historical controversy. In this seminar, we will assess some of the extensive literature on race and class in the US. Among the questions we will grapple with over the course of the year will be: What is the theoretical status of “race”? How do different sociologists understand social class? How were the racial categories “black” and “white” socially constructed alongside plantation slavery during the 17th and 18th centuries? How were these racial categories preserved and transformed as slavery was abolished, new immigrants arrived in the US and new forms of class inequality evolved over the course of the 19th century? How have racial categories been transformed as African-Americans have become an overwhelmingly urban people who compete as legal equals for jobs, education and housing with European-Americans? What is the current relationship of race and class in the US? Readings will be substantial, varied and historical in perspective.
 
SOC 8000: Foucault, Bourdieu and Baudrillard: Culture, Power, and Sexuality in the Global Era, Prof. Marnia Lazreg, Mondays, 4:15-6:15 pm, 3 credits
 
Bourdieu as well as Baudrillard expressed reticent admiration for, and skepticism about Foucault’s critical theoretical insights.  They both struggled with the same issues that are central to Foucault’s work: power, changing cultural practices as well as sexuality.    By the same token, they sought to distinguish themselves from Foucault’s approach.  Have they, as sociologists, transformed or extended Foucault’s analyses in grappling with the global contemporary challenges of culturalism, identity politics, social and racial strife, and sexual diversity?
 
    Using methods borrowed from the history of ideas as well as the sociology of knowledge, this course examines Bourdieu’s and Baudrillard’s efforts to build a critical sociology with practical applications for social change as they struggled with Foucault’s conceptual innovations. Special attention will be given to the meanings and articulations of key concepts and issues, including structure and event/history; language, rules and discourse; power and subjectivation; body, sex/sexuality and gender; biopolitics and racial supremacy; (non-Western) revolutions and political spirituality; security/war and self-defense.  The course will further examine the degree to which the concrete socio-political activities in which each author engaged informed his theoretical commitment.  
 
    The class will be conducted as a seminar that encourages an in-depth exploration of the multifaceted relationship between culture, power, and sexuality in various settings.  It will emphasize reading primary sources as much as possible, and thinking critically and boldly.  Students are expected to immerse themselves in the works of these authors, and write a paper focusing on two critical issues with which one of them engaged. Selecting current socio-political events or issues as testing ground for the three theorists’ ideas is strongly encouraged. The paper will be elaborated in stages to be discussed in class until its completion.
 
Main Texts: 
Foucault, excerpts from a selection of Lectures at the College de France, “Security, Territory and Population,” (1977-78); Birth of Biopolitics (1978-79); “On the Government of the Living” (1979- 1980);  History of Sexuality, II and II; Herculine Barbin.
Bourdieu, Outline of a Theory of Practice; Masculine Domination; Acts of Resistance; The Bachelors’ Ball; excerpts from On the State: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1989-1992.
Baudrillard, Seduction; Symbolic Exchange and Death; Simulacra and Simulation.
 
THEA 70600: History of Theatrical Theory, (Professor Peter Eckersall), Tuesdays, 4:15 p.m. to 6:15 p.m, 3 credits.
 
This course will introduce students to theatrical theory as a research discipline and will examine theories that have influenced contemporary theatre and performance studies. We will begin with a general discussion of what constitutes theory and then proceed modularly to examine such key theatrical and performance concepts as representation, mimesis, dramaturgy, and audience response. A modular structure will allow us to follow and create ongoing dialogues about these concepts as they have evolved. The second objective of the course will be met through, again, a modular approach to the presentation and discussion of such influential critical and cultural theories as formalism and structuralism, semiotics, post-structuralism, deconstruction, feminism, and cultural theory, as well as other disciplinary approaches—coming from, for instance, anthropology, sociology, and psychology—that have transformed theatre and performance.
 
           
THEA 71400: Aesthetics of the Film (This course is sponsored by Film Studies Certificate Program), Professor Jerry Carlson, Wednesdays, 4:15 p.m. to 6:15 p.m., 3 credits.
The movies – that is, narrative feature films – have always been recognized as a powerful medium for storytelling. Indeed, a century of censorship attests to the fears provoked by film’s seductive spell. FSCP 81000 will explore how that spell is created by the many strategies and tactics of storytelling, some shared with other media, others unique to cinema. To do so, we will engage with the history of narrative theory (or, narratology, as Tzvetan Todorov coined it in 1969). What explanatory powers do different theories offer? Our survey will move from Aristotle’s foundational Poetics to pre-cinematic theories of fiction (for example, Henry James), from the Russian Formalists to French high theory (Barthes, Genette, et al.), and from Neo-Formalist explanations (Bordwell) to ideologically positioned interventions from Marxism, psychoanalysis, queer theory or other approaches. We will put each theory in conversation with a pertinent feature film. The range of screenings will be global and diverse in narrative forms. Filmmakers may include, among others, Buster Keaton, Howard Hawks, Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, Agnes Varda, Alain Resnais, Nicolas Roeg, Raul Ruiz, Chantal Akerman, Wong Kar-wai, and Tomas Gutierrez Alea. A number of questions will recur as we explore different theories. What is plot? How can the effects of plotting be explained? What are the options for cinematic narration? What is in common with other media? What is medium specific? How can narratology explain the nature of cinematic authorship? How does cinema create characters? How can it place them in social context or explore their subjectivity as they journey through the plot. The precision of our answers will help explain the spell of the movies in their social, cultural, historical, and emotional impact.
 
THEA 81500: Seminar in Film Studies: Film/Media Theory Strategies of Resistance, Prof. Amy Herzog, Thursdays, 11:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m., 3 credits.
 
This course will provide a survey of Film and Media Theory, with a particular focus on activist media and strategies of resistance.  The seminar will be organized historically, spanning Soviet revolutionary films, 1960s newsreel collectives, Third Cinema movements, labor organizing media, activist television, contemporary anti-gentrification media, and digital and social media production. Each session will juxtapose mainstream fictional and non-fictional representations with contemporaneous media produced by independent resistance groups, as well as studies of the labor conditions and economic structures that shape the media industries during that period. Each student will research their own “constellation” of historical media texts, and media-based creative projects will be encouraged.
 
Questions of intersectionality and power will be core to this course. What formal strategies have emerged at different historical moments, and toward what ends? How do industry structures, distribution networks, and exhibition contexts impact the meaning of media texts? Who performs what labor within the media technology industries, and how is access determined? What historical forces impact the evolution of film and media theories? How can spectatorship theorized in relation to diverse media audiences and transforming sites of consumption?
 
Readings and screenings will include readings and media works by Sergei Eisenstein, Walter Benjamin, Fernando Solanas and Octavio Getino, Third World Newsreel, Chicana Por Mi Raza Media Collective, Racquel Gates, DIVA TV, Electronic Disturbance Theater, Mariame Kaba, Cardi B, and Lisa Nakamura. Student research projects will culminate in a final paper and multimedia dossier. Project proposals and field notes will be shared via a course website, and findings will be presented in class.

UED 75200: Critical Perspectives on Hope, Love and Care in Urban SchoolingProf. Rivera-McCutchen, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.

Neoliberal “high stakes” accountability measures come at a high cost in urban schools, where low-income Black, Latinx and other minoritized youth are often concentrated. Schools become sites of transactions, rather than sites of transformation. In this course, we will explore a more humanistic approach to urban schooling, focusing specifically on critical conceptions of care, love, and hope. Beginning with the premise that schooling must be explicitly focused on creating equitable and socially just learning environments where educators must actively work to disrupt structural inequality, this course will explore scholars whose work examines (theoretically and empirically) these concepts.

UED 75200: What’s Foucault Got To Do With It?: Race, Gender and Neoliberalism As Educational Spaces, Prof. Sonu, Thursdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m.

This course will take a Foucauldian approach to understanding power/knowledge and governmentality as it relates to racialization, gender-making, neoliberalism, and subjectivity. Readings will be theoretical as well as empirical and will take up education broadly. Assignments include small research activities and scaffolded writing projects intended for future journal publication.

UED 75200: Race/ism and Intersectionality in Urban Education: Theory, Praxis, and Transformation, Prof. Deckman, Tuesdays, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

This course will engage class members in a semester-long exploration of intersectionality in education, using race/ism as the starting point. Together we will probe the foundations and central tenets of intersectionality, from its origins in Critical Legal Studies and Black feminism, to current applications, debates, and evolutions in education. We will ask: How are racism and other systems of power and oppression (such as ableism, sexism, and heterosexism) mutually constitutive in educational contexts and to what end? How has educational research and practice responded and contributed to these dynamics? In addition, how have communities engaged in transformational, intersectional praxis in educational contexts? Finally, as an act of critical practice within the context of this course itself, students will co-construct the curriculum—determining course materials and co-facilitating one course meeting—and apply theoretical understandings to self-designed inquiry projects.

UED 75200: Approaches to Discourse Analysis in Language and Literacy Research, Prof. Schieble, Tuesdays, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.

Discourse analysis is a study of the relationship between the form and function of talk and text and the social world. This course will explore various approaches to discourse analysis as both theory and method. Starting with theories about language and literacy as social practice, the course will move into an exploration of multiple approaches to discourse analysis based on scholarly tradition and including emerging approaches such as temporal and positive discourse analysis. Practices including the construction of a multimodal transcript and ways to engage in researcher reflexivity and social action will be addressed. The course will place particular emphasis on critical approaches to discourse analysis for engaging in language and literacy research that is oriented to investigating systems of oppression, liberation, structure, and agency. 

UED 75200: Critical University Studies, Prof. Brier, Mondays, 4:15 – 6:15 p.m.

This seminar on Critical University Studies (CUS), offered in the Urban Education program and cross-listed in MALS, will explore the role of higher education, especially public universities, at the intersection of issues of race, class, gender, culture, political economy, and politics, with a particular emphasis on the City University of New York. CUS is a relatively new field of interdisciplinary inquiry, drawing theoretical inspiration from the fields of Cultural Studies and Critical Legal Studies. It focuses on the critical examination of the institutional structures, ideologies, histories, and changing curricular forms and methods of scholarly inquiry and teaching in higher education institutions in the United States and beyond. It analyzes the neoliberal attacks over the past four decades on public universities by politicians and business interests and the oppositional responses of college faculty and staff as well as undergraduate and graduate students and the larger communities they serve to the savage funding cuts and ideological and intellectual critiques faced by public higher education systems around the country. We will read deeply in recent and landmark literature on CUS and seminar members will conduct scholarly research and writing on relevant CUS topics or areas of interest in public higher education, with a special emphasis on the historical development and contemporary situation of the City University of New York.

The seminar will:
•  explore the history of public university systems (especially, though not exclusively, CUNY);
•  analyze recent and current efforts to transform public higher education institutions and systems across the country.
•  hypothesize about where the public university is headed in the coming decades in the midst of austerity and neoliberal politics and policies as well the unrelenting impact of new technologies and the rise of contingent forms of academic labor.

We will read both classic and contemporary studies of public universities, explore available physical and digital university archives (including the CUNY Digital History Archive [CDHA] currently being developed at the Graduate Center), and undertake new research and scholarly and public publication projects on CUS. Graduate student participants will be expected over the course of the semester to conceive and launch individual and/or collaborative research and publication projects in CUS, with a special focus on CUNY.

The seminar is open to all GC PhD students in social science and humanities disciplines, as well as MALS and other Master’s students interested in exploring the changing nature and role of public higher education in contemporary society. The course is taught by Professor Stephen Brier, faculty member in the PhD program in Urban Education and in the MALS and M.A. in Digital Humanities programs and the certificate programs in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy and American Studies. Brier recently co-authored (with Michael Fabricant) a CUS-themed book, Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher Education (Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 2016). The seminar sessions will include presentations by several GC and outside presenters active in the CUS field.

We will make full use of the digital affordances of the CUNY Academic Commons to extend the reach of the seminar, including developing our own public-facing blog on CUS- and CUNY-related issues (similar to the “Remaking the University” blog developed by faculty in the University of California system, which everyone in the seminar should subscribe to and read).

The course focuses on a series of key questions that have roiled American society over the last century and a half (and especially since the end of World War II) about the nature and meaning of public education:

•   What is the purpose/role of public higher education in a democratic society?
•   Is the role of public higher education solely practical (i.e., job training to assure national economic progress and individual social mobility)?
•   Or is the role of education broadly political and/or ideological (educating students for their role in a democracy and teaching them how to be critical thinkers vs. providing students with tools to help them become productive members of and advanced capitalist society)?
•   How should those who work and learn in institutions of higher education respond to efforts to transform the mission of the public university in the face of increasing uses of technology and contingent labor?